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Gordon Ramsay
March 22, 2009 3:21 PM   Subscribe

Short recipe segments from Gordon Ramsay's "The F Word." Seabass with sorrel sauce::Black Bream on a bed of petite pois with baby onions and pancetta::Escalope of chicken with sautéed potatoes and red chard::Duck breast in gooseberry sauce::Lemon Sole en papillote::Seabass and pepper sauce:: Turkey with truffle butter::Monkfish with a mussels broth::Poached chicken in morel sauce::Pheasant with a smooth bread sauce::Stuffed saddle of lamb with apricot and cumin::Dover sole with shrimp butter::Smoked paprika chicken stroganoff::Brocolli Soup::Brill with a red wine sauce::Tagliatelle with rabbit fricassee::Eggs on Toast::Rib Eye Steak ::Pan Glazed Fillet of Beef::Rack of lamb:: Stuffed chicken legs with sausage meat and marsala sauce::Beef Wellington
posted by vronsky (74 comments total) 127 users marked this as a favorite

 
Fucking delicious.
posted by Elmore at 3:22 PM on March 22, 2009


Fucking shit big boy, that shit looks fucking stupendous.
posted by saladin at 3:25 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


What's the one he's always shouting about on Hell's Kitchen? Hic Tartare Tu Asinus, I think?
posted by boo_radley at 3:34 PM on March 22, 2009


you missed my favorite one...Beef Wellington

I do love that show, thanks for the links.
posted by hugecranium at 3:35 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


I am looking forward to trying some of these. Thanks.
posted by Muttoneer at 3:37 PM on March 22, 2009


boo_radley: "What's the one he's always shouting about on Hell's Kitchen?"

Not sure what you mean. But now when I feed my whippets, I tell them it's "Dewberry's Dog Dinner".
posted by Joe Beese at 3:39 PM on March 22, 2009


Yeah I emailed the mods as soon as I realized I forgot that one hugecranium. Should be up there shortly :)
posted by vronsky at 3:39 PM on March 22, 2009


The Beef Wellington was his major gripe for the first few seasons of Hell's Kitchen, as far as the skill of the cooks went. At the time, it made me really want to try one, as I didn't quite understand what went into it except beef and puff pastry.

I suppose the parma ham adds saltiness and umami, while the (dehydrated) mushroom adds well, some more umami, as well as a woodsy type of flavour (depending on the mushroom). Add that to the savoury umami goodness of beef, the sting of the mustard, and the fat and rock salt combination of the puff pastry, and you've got something that satisfies cravings like fast food but tastes and looks ten times as good.

Well, now I really want one.
posted by flippant at 3:44 PM on March 22, 2009


My favorite F Word Gordon Ramsay recipe.
posted by kkokkodalk at 3:45 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


that seabass looks delicious but it's waaaay too fast an explanation for me to even think about trying to do that. that length of a video is barely enough to explain to a doofus like myself how to boil an egg.

thinking of which: it's a shame these cooking shows don't put additional content ("a slow how-to video of what you've just seen where we make sure you really all get it even if you have never managed to boil an egg in your life") on their websites. this is what youtube was made for. or vimeo.
posted by krautland at 3:46 PM on March 22, 2009


I've never had scrambled eggs of that consistency - I'll be trying that one.
posted by HopperFan at 3:46 PM on March 22, 2009


that much butter on a steak? huh. ...really?
posted by sexyrobot at 3:52 PM on March 22, 2009


I actually really hate the way these are presented - even though they seem fucking delicious.
Beef
Salt
Cut
Oil
Lemon Zest
Fresh Basil
Your Momma
Pan
Oven
Grill

Come on, if it's that good explain it properly and stop trying to be 'hip'.
posted by Elmore at 3:56 PM on March 22, 2009


So, yeah, what krautland said.
posted by Elmore at 4:00 PM on March 22, 2009


I actually really hate the way these are presented - even though they seem fucking delicious.

That sums up Ramsey's projects these days - both UK & US versions of Kitchen Nightmares are pretty much unwatchable, Hell's Kitchen is just embarrassing, and The F Word is a squandered opportunity. Far too much sizzle, not enough steak.

Ha!
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 4:06 PM on March 22, 2009


Yeah, Gordon Ramsay is excellent, but the recipes on The F Word always make me dizzy trying to remember. The cut shots are so very modern, and the food looks good, but that's the part where I'm really trying to concentrate and remember, and they don't make it easy. I get that it's not strictly a cooking show, not just 'here's how to cook this, step by step, here's the recipe again,' which also gets tedious, but in those shows at least they usually present it in a way which allows you to write it down easily. And, yes, the show assumes you know your way around the kitchen, which is great if you do, but probably a bit tricky if you don't. It's always possible to look up the techniques he talks about, however.
posted by krinklyfig at 4:10 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


Those are inspiring. When I was a kid, the skin of the salmon was my favorite part. I've stopped serving the skin, but after seeing his fish presentations I want to do that- crispy skin, featured, right on top, with no sauce to make it soggy. Lovely. Oh and my second favorite part of the salmon was the backbone, from the jars of fillets my grandmother had canned.

And I liked the short-hand presentation of the videos as well. Broad strokes, broad strokes.

Thanks for the nice selection of clips.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 4:10 PM on March 22, 2009


Chop up football career,
Infuse personality with foul mouthed rudeness,
Add young innocent kitchen staff,
flambe,
Add two TV shows,
Glaze with spirit of Simon Cowell,
Open more restaurants,
Transfer from a cold UK to a hot USA,
remove from oven and place on papers with bad review removed from hotel lobby,
Curse,
Curse some more,
Openly admit to having an affair on TV chat show,
Curse,
Add salt,
Apologise to wife,
Add lemon zest,
Add fresh basil,
Admit to another affair,
Remove from oven,
flambe with cognac,
keep serving up cooking programs with 'tude.
posted by Elmore at 4:11 PM on March 22, 2009 [6 favorites]


Nigella's show is like that too, though. Along with the fact that she seems like she might fall asleep without warning, it irritates me that there aren't any recipes on her show. Sure, there's a list of ingredients, and that'll do for some things, but come on; just tell me how much fucking flour I need to put into your goddamn torte.
posted by boo_radley at 4:15 PM on March 22, 2009


"both UK & US versions of Kitchen Nightmares are pretty much unwatchable"

I like both, but the UK version is more interesting to me, because the pace allows for more directions to go, and more time to get into longer conversations. The US version tries to play up conflict too much and sometimes gets a bit contrived, like all US reality television. Still, I love the show. It helps if you spent many years working in various restaurants. Hell's Kitchen isn't nearly as fun. The pacing drives me nuts, like the worst combination of reality television and modern game shows, like a big put on.
posted by krinklyfig at 4:16 PM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


I was going to say that these are probably best for an intermediate level cook krautland, as he doesn't give exact measurements or cooking times. You should give the lemon sole en papillote a try. That one is hard to mess up and you will be impressed with the results.

I don't see it as trying to be "hip" at all elmore. As someone who started teaching himself to cook about ten years ago as a hobby, I like that he gets to the point and just mentions the essentials. I know how to reduce a cream sauce already. There are other shows that get into the finer details, but these are just perfect for me, and really represent the way I like to cook and eat.

Also, I am not a fan of the "American" version of Ramsay. Hell's Kitchen is unwatchable imo, with him going all shouty at the staff like clockwork. The best Ramsay show was the original Kitchen Nightmares on BBC. There was real intelligence and camaraderie on those early shows (and yes, a bit of shouting too). His other shows don't hold a candle to that one.
posted by vronsky at 4:19 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


I've never watched Nigella. And, to be fair I do enjoy the entertainment of the Kitchen Nightmare shows. But really the only cooking show worth watching is Come Dine With Me. Especially brilliant on a Sunday evening on More4 when they show all 5 episodes in a block.
posted by Elmore at 4:21 PM on March 22, 2009


I wanted to try Ramsay's Broccoli Soup recipe when I saw him bitchslap a guy on Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares with it (metaphorically). The restauranteur had 14 ingredients in his. Gordon had 3. 6 if you count the optional goat cheese, walnuts and olive oil. When I got my nice new blender for xmas, it was the first thing I used it for.

It was insane. It tasted of pure essence of broccoli. It had sufficient broccolis. Adding goat cheese made it even more amazing. Olive oil was just gilding the lily.

This post is so favorited.
posted by SansPoint at 4:27 PM on March 22, 2009 [7 favorites]


I don't see it as trying to be "hip" at all elmore. As someone who started teaching himself to cook about ten years ago as a hobby, I like that he gets to the point and just mentions the essentials. I know how to reduce a cream sauce already.

... Because you are so 'hip'.
posted by Elmore at 4:30 PM on March 22, 2009


Pretty much the whole point of these programmes is to sell books. Having said that, they usually publish recipies online:
  • BBC Recipe Finder (Nigella, Rick Stein, etc.)
  • Jamie Oliver
  • Gordon Ramsay
  • Other Channel 4 Chefs (Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall - River Cottage as well as Jamie, Nigella)

  • posted by bruzie at 4:31 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


    Oh, and Joe Beese, Hic Tartare Tu Asinus is dog latin for "It's raw you donkey". Well, not tartare, but I figured that'd be a more recognizable word.
    posted by boo_radley at 4:35 PM on March 22, 2009


    comma abuse, ask me how.
    posted by boo_radley at 4:36 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    This new Yorker profile, THE TAMING OF THE CHEF, by Bill Buford might give you a different perspective on Ramsay Elmore. "Gordon Ramsay, the only chef in London honored with three stars by the Guide Michelin, is not a monster. Ramsay, who is also the host of three uniquely adversarial in-your-face television shows (“Hell’s Kitchen” in the United States; “The F Word” and “Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares” in the United Kingdom), is not the most abusive person running a restaurant. And although a British undercover documentary once captured him in mid-torrent, profanities flowing in a diatribe directed at a young intern, earning Ramsay the title of one of the country’s “most unbearable bosses,” the people who work for him show a tenacious, irrational-seeming loyalty verging on love. But he does get angry, helplessly and uncontrollably angry—not an earthly anger but something darker—and has trouble knowing how to stop."

    Ramsay came up through the French brigade system, and the abusiveness of classic French chefs is legendary. It was how he was trained. I saw an interview with Cat Cora once and she said that the first day she was interning at some 3 star in France, the chef came in to inspect the kitchen and found some chives a sous chef had thrown away in the trash. When he found out who did it, he walked up to them and slapped them as hard as he could across the face.
    posted by vronsky at 4:37 PM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


    For those wanting a slower version of his recipes, you will find most of his TV recipes in his various cookbooks. Gordon Ramsay's Fast Food includes many recipes from The F Word, and his other books cover other TV shows including Kitchen Nightmares.
    posted by Meagan at 4:39 PM on March 22, 2009


    "Hell's Kitchen is unwatchable imo, with him going all shouty at the staff like clockwork."

    I've often thought it would be far better if it were serious, like if it were a real cooking school in the French brigade tradition taught by Ramsay, not some stupid reality tv competition. It would be even better done in sort of documentary style with long shots and little narration. But that's probably not going to happen.
    posted by krinklyfig at 5:09 PM on March 22, 2009


    Lovely.

    I like Gordon Ramsay, but every time he says this, it makes me want to punch him.
    posted by PeterMcDermott at 5:14 PM on March 22, 2009


    but come on; just tell me how much fucking flour I need to put into your goddamn torte.

    just start with a 5-pound bag. if you need more, go get more. how much is flour? sheesh.
    posted by sexyrobot at 5:17 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    I've often thought it would be far better if it were serious, like if it were a real cooking school in the French brigade tradition taught by Ramsay, not some stupid reality tv competition.

    Watch Chef School then. It follows a bunch of students at Stratford Chef School for two years.
    posted by dirtynumbangelboy at 5:44 PM on March 22, 2009


    "Watch Chef School then. It follows a bunch of students at Stratford Chef School for two years."

    OK, will do that. Thanks.
    posted by krinklyfig at 5:55 PM on March 22, 2009


    Thanks, now the tuna sandwich I was about to make before seeing these videos will taste like ashes in my mouth.

    But seriously, thanks -- great post. As for the pace and content of the recipe videos, I find it to be very direct, obviously targeted to a non-beginner cook.
    posted by Simon Barclay at 6:13 PM on March 22, 2009


    vronsky, why would throwing chives out warrant a slap?
    posted by exlotuseater at 6:16 PM on March 22, 2009


    These clips highlight that good food, even fancy food, can be found in a simple list of ingredients. What they gloss over is that this good food relies on honed technique, like knowing how long to cook everything and at what temperature to turn out a beef Wellington that has rosy beef, a supple duxelle, and puff pastry that is neither soggy nor burnt. Like a great French omelet, it takes a lot of practice.

    As someone who has put in that practice, I think these videos are good!
    posted by Foam Pants at 6:17 PM on March 22, 2009


    The Beef Wellington was his major gripe for the first few seasons of Hell's Kitchen, as far as the skill of the cooks went.

    I cooked a Beef Wellington for the first time for Christmas dinner last year (although I used Tyler Florence's recipe. [And that green peppercorn sauce is *to die* for.])

    It's not easy. There's plenty of places to make potentially meal-killing mistakes and the actual assembly, while something a professional is probably well acquaintend with, can be tricky for a first time amatuer. But all in all it turned out OK and I think I learned enough from the first go-round to take it into Pretty Good territory next time I try it.

    Can't imagine making in on a restaruant's scale and timetable, though.
    posted by Cyrano at 6:37 PM on March 22, 2009


    the people who work for him show a tenacious, irrational-seeming loyalty verging on love

    For every talented toxic boss, there's a horde of esteem-seeking underlings unwilling to publicly say anything but praise. Not favorably representing your employer in the media in these kinds of jobs is pretty much a career-killer. Plus there is the reward-for-loyalty aspect. Then there is the end-of-employment agreement thrust in your face when you leave or are fired, which you don't have to sign, but generally come with generous take-it-or-leave it severances. You would be surprised to know how far high-profile fuckers go to protect their public image, or at least their private business.
    posted by mrmojoflying at 6:40 PM on March 22, 2009


    It was insane. It tasted of pure essence of broccoli. It had sufficient broccolis.

    I came in here to convince someone else to test out the broccoli soup recipe for me so I wouldn't have to dirty my blender. You've convinced me.

    After tasting a spoonful from the blender, which consisted of nothing but broccoli and broccoli-infused water, I swear he was about to say "you can really taste the broccoli".
    posted by Adam_S at 6:44 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    "why would throwing chives out warrant a slap" Two reasons i think exlotuseater. Food cost number one. In professional kitchens nothing goes to waste. And secondly, to allow the chef to assert his alpha male dominance over the staff. In another Buford piece in the New Yorker he spent six months working in Mario Batali's kitchen and he did the same thing everyday when he came in the kitchen - he checked the trash cans and screamed at people for wasting food.

    here it is -- THE SECRET OF EXCESS (great piece and Mario also trained under Marco Pierre White)
    posted by vronsky at 7:00 PM on March 22, 2009


    why would throwing chives out warrant a slap?

    I won't speak for vronsky, but as a fifteen-year-old, I worked for an upper-crust fourth-generation restaurant in an Ivy League town and mistakenly put out too many butter pats on the second floor. Of course, butter goes rancid out of its cool enclave, but my family used margarine and I didn't know no better.

    Until that day, I had never understood the cost of butter and the importance of not wasting it until the owner stopped me as I walked out of the cooler, dressing me down in front of the entire restaurant staff.

    I was called things I'd never been called before. I was called things I've never yet been called in Metatalk. It was embarrassing. He brought me to tears.

    And rightfully so. Butter is fucking expensive. Ingredients that are wasted eat into slim margins. Wasting food is worse than murder.
    posted by Blazecock Pileon at 7:02 PM on March 22, 2009 [4 favorites]


    Unless you're baking or making complex sauces you can usually judge portions and cooking times by experience and senses. Time and temperature doesn't need to be stated because you already know at what temp and how long it takes to to sear your rib-eye. That's why Ramsay and Oliver are so popular with the foodie crowd. We just want ingredient lists, and some simple advice on technique or selection.
    posted by furtive at 7:14 PM on March 22, 2009


    This is tremendous. I've spent the last few days watching as much of Kitchen Nightmares I can find on youtube, but these links made drool fall out the side of my grinning mouth.

    SansPoint: It was insane. It tasted of pure essence of broccoli. It had sufficient broccolis. Adding goat cheese made it even more amazing. Olive oil was just gilding the lily.

    You have made me want to go looking for broccoli, and it's almost 11 PM. I want this soup.
    posted by mariokrat at 7:47 PM on March 22, 2009


    Ramsay came up through the French brigade system, and the abusiveness of classic French chefs is legendary.

    I once had a truly great meal at Daniel that was made just a little more awesome by the sound of Daniel Bolud screaming obscenities at one of his employees. Bolud took the poor guy into an alcove to do it, but the closest three or four tables could hear. My Lord, I hope to hell no one ever gets that mad at me. Maybe I just watch too much Gordon Ramsey, but it was great entertainment.
    posted by Bookhouse at 8:11 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


    I know we're talking about tv shows, but if you want the long-form version of this stuff WITH pictures and detailed, normal-people descriptions I can't recommend the best "cookbook" in the whole world strongly enough.
    posted by basicchannel at 8:18 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    How many french chefs get fragged? I've got to imagine it's a high number.
    posted by boo_radley at 8:38 PM on March 22, 2009


    You know I have managed people for over twenty years. I own my my own business. There is absolutely no excuse for screaming obscenities in the work place at anyone for any reason. And trust me I have seen it all. That kind of abusive shit is narcissistic bulling and the symptom of a cowardly and weak character. And don't go telling me it's unique to the pressures of the restaurant business. I worked in restaurants all through high school and college. No one was ever as abusive as Ramsey is in his show. Ever. Anybody treated me or anyone that way in my presence they would either apologize or be pulling my boot out of their assholes. Ramsey is a chicken shit bully.
    posted by tkchrist at 9:24 PM on March 22, 2009


    I didn't know.
    posted by bz at 9:40 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    I've never worked in a restaurant, but friends who do have said that restaurants can indeed be pretty abusive places and you need a thick skin. My guess is that are probably as many differents between restaurants as there are between restaurants and other places of business. Overall, though, restaurants are generally more fast-paced and urgent, so I can imagine a lot of aggressive back-and-forth going on.

    I'd also add that abusiveness is part of Gordon's shtick and I think it's kind of a condensed and messed up version of one-minute managing. Watching Kitchen Nightmare epsiodes I notice that he occasionally follows abuse with an explanation and reassurance, particularly when he feels the person he's venting at has the potential to change.

    I mean, yeah, he definitely has an anger management issue. I'd never want to make a mistake if I was working for him, and I probably wouldn't want to work for him ever (assuming I ever got involved in the food industry). Still, if I did ever become a chef and he tasted my food and said it tasted good, I'd put a lot more weight behind his assessment. Maybe that's why he works on TV.
    posted by Deathalicious at 9:43 PM on March 22, 2009


    both UK & US versions of Kitchen Nightmares are pretty much unwatchable

    I like the 'idea' of Kitchen Nightmares, but I just can't get past the damn reality TV editing. "Here's some stuff you already saw! Okay, some new stuff is happening, isn't it exciting!? Now here is what you'll see next!" It seems like half the show is taken up ensuring people stick around for the commercials or catching those up who just starting watching after them. Do they re-edit even shorter for DVD?
    posted by ODiV at 9:55 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    The cuts and music are a bit annoying, but otherwise this is my type of cooking show. Give me ingredients and techniques, if I want measurements and times I'll take up baking.
    posted by ryoshu at 10:29 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    but I just can't get past the damn reality TV editing

    Yeah, that's one of the main reasons I can't watch the US version. I've seen the first three UK seasons and it's much better.
    posted by Tenuki at 10:35 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    I was called things I'd never been called before. I was called things I've never yet been called in Metatalk. It was embarrassing. He brought me to tears.

    And rightfully so.


    This is not a healthy attitude to take.
    posted by dirigibleman at 10:45 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


    Ramsay's actually done long-form live cookalongs for C4, which haven't made it to the US (either via BBC America or the Fox mistranslations).
    posted by holgate at 11:38 PM on March 22, 2009


    Another (formerly) angry chef, Heston B: "I just walked back to the door and pulled the trigger. I completely lost it. That was scary - it wasn't an adrenalin rush. Everything slowed down. My wife pulled me back, the gun went up.”
    posted by Kiwi at 3:27 AM on March 23, 2009


    My favorite Ramsay clip: Eating traditional Finnish food with a Finnish woman (who I presume is a chef herself) and telling her all of it is shite.
    posted by bardic at 3:38 AM on March 23, 2009


    I heard that Ramsey and his head chef at his London joint used to spit roast a waitress every week. That was a few years ago, but it fits in with the relentlessly egotistical, bullying, desperate, power-mad, control freak, masochist, philanderer that I have seen on his television shows since.
    I liken his recipes to those of the Two Fat Ladies regarding the lardy, lactose intense content, only delivered with no sense of humour or humility.

    If I wanted creamy scrambled eggs, I would go vegan and use silken tofu.

    His so-called reality shows are unbearable, at least for the past four years, as one cannot believe that the establishments would allow filming of their unsafe kitchens and useless staff. The solution is always the same, if he had his way restaurants would be more boring.

    That said, if people get into cooking via watching his programmes then that is all for the good. Just know that, as tkchrist notes, it is not necessary to give yourself high-blood pressure in the process.
    posted by asok at 5:04 AM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


    Ramsay's Nightmare (NSFW)
    posted by malevolent at 6:50 AM on March 23, 2009 [3 favorites]


    I like Ramsay, warts and all, but that that scrambled egg dish was kind of messed up. It was a cheat.

    Here, allow me to make you the most delicious radish ever. First, we'll coat it with blue cheese and prosciutto. Then we'll deep fry it. Yum!

    I mean, that's a ridiculous extension of adding all that creme fraiche to the eggs.
    posted by bardic at 7:30 AM on March 23, 2009


    Ramsay vs. Ricky Gervais
    posted by vronsky at 7:49 AM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


    Yeah, Gordon Ramsay is excellent, but the recipes on The F Word always make me dizzy trying to remember. The cut shots are so very modern, and the food looks good, but that's the part where I'm really trying to concentrate and remember, and they don't make it easy.

    That's probably because these short presentations aren't actually intended to be lessons; they're a quick, snappy explanation of the process of what his team of contestant chefs are cooking on the show this week. The full recipes are on the show's website and are almost always all you need.
    posted by mightygodking at 9:03 AM on March 23, 2009


    If I wanted creamy scrambled eggs, I would go vegan and use silken tofu.

    Speaking as someone who was once a dedicated vegan, let me tell you that pretending silken tofu is an acceptable substitute/proxy for Ramsay-style eggs is sad as hell.
    posted by Optimus Chyme at 10:09 AM on March 23, 2009 [8 favorites]


    I've made a few of these, but many rely on more typically European ingredients (gooseberries). Good stuff.
    posted by organic at 11:18 AM on March 23, 2009


    I love the F Word, except for the parts where he yells at people, and the competitive Reality-teevee nonsense of throwing someone off the show in, what, season 1? But the British foodies are huge fun, and the bit where he and a guest compete on a dish seems real, and is always entertaining. He does seem to have developed a massive ego, which will get punctured soon enough, no doubt. If he's screwing around publicly, I feel bad for his wife. Janet Street-Porter cracks me up every time she's on.

    I hate that he calls it "getting British women back into the kitchen," but the segments are pretty good.

    The video recipe clips show what the food will look like, and are enough for experienced cooks. Backed up with a written recipe from the website, they're an excellent aid to less-experienced cooks.

    Great post. thanks.
    posted by theora55 at 12:11 PM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


    "I mean, that's a ridiculous extension of adding all that creme fraiche to the eggs."

    I'd never heard of that either, and in fact, they looked a bit too creamy to me - but as I love eggs, what the hell. Anything once. I like how he says that he uses it as a test recipe - any other chefs testing someone on their ability to cook proper scrambled eggs would spit nails if they saw additives like creme fraiche being used.
    posted by HopperFan at 12:13 PM on March 23, 2009


    I have a modicum of respect for the success Ramsay has had with his career. I don't hate him because he has a ridiculously hot on-screen temper.

    These are really, really good. Almost art, even. He is reducing the recipes back to what they are: simple, good food.

    I'm going to repeat that, because it bears repeating: Simple, good food.

    For most cooks past the boil-an-egg stage, the shown ingredients, approximate quantities, and desired end result are enough to create a tasty product at home. I like these, and will be using them.
    posted by Night_owl at 2:28 PM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


    I'm a big fan of Ramsey and these recipes are great - straight forward with good ingredients. And the creamy eggs look fab. I like my eggs scrambled soft, most places scramble theirs too hard. Plus I love creme fraiche. The beans on toast though, ugh...
    posted by shoesietart at 4:02 PM on March 23, 2009


    It's interesting that the NYT profile refers to the notorious abusiveness of the French rank and file. Mostly because a number of chefs I've worked for have told me pro-chefs in the UK are the worst.

    One guy I worked with, for example, who was very serious about food, explained to me the concept of working in a restaurant without pay just to get one's certification from the chef/restaurant there. Not easy by any means, he told me the French are indeed pretty strict - if you're in charge of sauces, for example, you better not misplace a drop on those plates, or you'll be spending the rest of the week peeling potatoes and thinking about what you did. As rough as that is, apparently British chefs can be downright physically abusive.

    Case in point: he worked in a restaurant that had a head chef who was notoriously brutal. He was rumored to have once pushed a cook through a plate glass door. My friend thought this was probably just the staff talking him up, trying to put the Fear of Boss in him. In any event, the restaurant had an ancient steak oven near the floor. For whatever reason, this place frowned upon using fancy-shmancy "timers" for their steaks - you just had to know when each of the dozens of slabs of meat in there went in, and when each one would be ready to come out. On one night, a cook made the mistake of leaving one of the steaks in too long, rendering it overcooked. He apologized to the chef profusely, fearing the worst, but the chef seemed to brush it off, saying, "Don't worry about it, everyone makes mistakes." Relieved, the cook reached inside the steak oven to retrieve it. The chef then kicked the door shut on the cook's arm and said, "See that it doesn't happen again."

    I think I'd far prefer to peel potatoes than nurse second degree burns, personally, but my friend told me this cook stayed on, got his certification, and now runs a kitchen on a cruise ship. Where he probably throws cutting boards at the bus boys.
    posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 5:33 PM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


    Ok, look. I just got home from my Old English class, and I'm hungry. So I was thinking of this thread, and the vids I had skimmed the other night. So I think, oh, Ramsay had an interesting eggs-on-toast thing, maybe I'll make that. So I just cooked it, sans creme fraiche. 3 eggs in medium saucepan, tbsp or so of butter, on heat off heat on heat off heat all the while sort of folding them, yeah? Then a twist of sea salt and a twist of black pepper, folded in, and just a little finely chopped chives (which were about to spoil anyhow SO I THREW THE REST OUT) and I made toast and coffee in the meantime.

    So I just finished eating it.

    I WILL NEVER. NEVER. NEVER. EAT "REGULAR" SCRAMBLED EGGS AGAIN.

    I like eggs done in all sorts of ways, but if I ever eat "regular" firm-cooked scrambled eggs, I will weep bitter tears. I will make them this way forever (and frankly, they didn't need the creme fraiche anyway; they were fucking perfect without.)

    I am a lover of cooking and good food, who somehow fell out of cooking healthy and well for myself. (I used to cook all the time, then grad school happened. It's no excuse) That's changing tonight.
    posted by exlotuseater at 7:05 PM on March 23, 2009 [6 favorites]


    Oh, and thanks for enlightening me on the food-waste issue, blazecock and vronsky. I can say that it's good I never went into this business; I've worked as a waiter in a few places, mostly private golf clubs, but if someone so much as touched me in a kitchen for putting out the wrong amount of butter, or throwing out chives, we'd both be out of work, for different reasons. yeah, yeah, I know, big mouth on the internet, probably wouldn't back it up in "real life"--but I've got major issues with people hitting me. I'd probably do something rash.
    posted by exlotuseater at 7:23 PM on March 23, 2009


    I tried the scrambled eggs technique once. The best scrambled eggs. I've made them for others, with no exception everyone who has tasted them has converted. When there is no cream, a splash of half and half will do.

    Where in San Francisco can one eat a good Beef Wellington?
    posted by dirty lies at 4:25 AM on March 24, 2009


    organic - silken tofu is an acceptable substitute/proxy for Ramsay-style eggs

    It may surprise you to learn that taste is subjective, whether it is in food or personality. People like Ramsey and rent-a-gob Germain Greer are great on TV, but you wouldn't want them in your house shouting up the place.

    In general I would say that I prefer my food to be produced without suffering, be it animal or human! Restaurants with open kitchens are my favourites.

    If an animal is going to give it's life for my gastronomic pleasure, I consider Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall or Hecton Blumenthal to be the go-to guys for honoring the animal with putting as much care in disposing of the body cooking it as the animal did in staying alive and healthy.
    posted by asok at 7:44 AM on March 24, 2009 [1 favorite]


    The Broccoli soup is fantastic. Goes really well with the Chevre as well, though I suppose his was better than mine.
    posted by flippant at 10:36 AM on March 24, 2009


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