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This is what the Internet is for (SLYT)
January 29, 2010 11:53 AM   Subscribe

This is what the Internet is for (SLYT) A well executed virtual jam session. People from all over the world connecting in creativity. Kutiman, eat your heart out.
posted by monospace (34 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
Cool.
posted by Outlawyr at 12:15 PM on January 29, 2010


Very.
posted by Thorzdad at 12:16 PM on January 29, 2010


Good music created by collaborators from around the world and distributed for free. thisLet's see the record execs figure out how to commidfy this.
posted by etc. at 12:17 PM on January 29, 2010


That was really good. Thanks for posting the link. I don't know if this counts as a jam session, though -- it seems like all of the parts were arranged.
posted by spiderskull at 12:18 PM on January 29, 2010


Kutiman, have a sandwich or something instead.

This is cool, but it's an arranged song. Kutiman is something completely different.
posted by fire&wings at 12:27 PM on January 29, 2010 [5 favorites]


Thanks for reminding me about Kutiman. It was nice to go back and have another listen. It really is something else, isn't it?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 12:31 PM on January 29, 2010 [3 favorites]


Awww I was hoping it was a bunch of people smearing jam on themselves. What a let down.
posted by stormpooper at 12:31 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


fire&wings: "Kutiman, have a sandwich or something instead. ... Kutiman is something completely different."

This.

But at least this post may bring some new visitors to the Kutiman FPP - which remains one of the top 5 greatest posts I've ever seen in the blue.
posted by Joe Beese at 12:34 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


Very enjoyable! Thanks a lot.
posted by mdrosen at 12:36 PM on January 29, 2010


Excuse me, I'd like to purchase your music. What do you mean "missing the point"?
posted by Think_Long at 12:55 PM on January 29, 2010


Also, please remove the scat singing. It doesn't do anything for me.
posted by Think_Long at 12:56 PM on January 29, 2010


I love Kutiman, but that's a mashup, cool as it is. I'm just mesmerized by the notion that people now have the ability to collaborate creatively in real time from remote locations, and have the result be available for the whole world to see. No special software required; just a webcam and a fast connection.
posted by monospace at 12:59 PM on January 29, 2010


Most likely some decent recording equipment was involved as well. It sounds almost too good for what it seems to be, though, and makes me wonder if there was a master mix and they just video-played their parts to the music. I'm not saying it was like that, just speculatin'.
posted by unwordy at 1:08 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


I had something like ninjam in my mind when I clicked through.

I would link to ninjam's website but it has recently been replaced by the front page of its supporting organization.
posted by melatonic at 1:12 PM on January 29, 2010


Was this actually done live, all at the same time? Or did they record their parts separately and then put the movies together?

It's pretty cool either way.
posted by echo target at 1:19 PM on January 29, 2010


Let's see the record execs figure out how to commidfy this.

Oh, go back to boing boing, Cory.
posted by Catblack at 1:22 PM on January 29, 2010


Word.
posted by Non-Prophet at 1:26 PM on January 29, 2010


Most likely some decent recording equipment was involved as well.

No doubt, but decent recording equipment is equally affordable these days.
posted by monospace at 1:34 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


and distributed for free.

Or, more correctly, distributed at no cost to you. The actual cost of hosting it on youtube is being paid for by advertising (or youtube is slouching towards bankruptcy). So, the execs have already figured out how to commodify it. How you interpret that as a "win" is unclear.
posted by doctor_negative at 1:39 PM on January 29, 2010


This is not 'live improvisation over the net'. If you want that, check out ninjam. Ninjam uses intervalic buffering to work around the fact that music is realtime, while the internet is not (quite--- some success has been achieved when all users are connected via true end-to-end broadband, such as on internet2). All connected users hear what everyone else played the last measure, while all play the next measure. Ninjam has been used to produce pleasing results despite this limitation.
posted by melatonic at 1:50 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


That was really cool. Enjoyed watched everyone work off each other - thanks for posting monospace!
posted by garnetgirl at 2:01 PM on January 29, 2010


I apparently don't know what SLYT means.

But I love collaboratively produced music. Always cool!
posted by achmorrison at 2:09 PM on January 29, 2010


Also, please remove the scat singing turntable. It doesn't do anything for me.
posted by emelenjr at 3:10 PM on January 29, 2010


This was indeed extremely cool, but it is conclusively not what the Internet is for. If you're interested in what the Internet is for, I advise you to look one post back, at the Japanese businesscat video.
posted by You Can't Tip a Buick at 3:35 PM on January 29, 2010


The one basic rule of art:

If you're a painter, don't paint a picture about someone painting a picture.
If you're a poet, don't write poetry about someone writing poetry.
If you're a writer, don't write a book about someone writing a book.
If you're a movie director, don't direct a movie about someone directing a movie.
If you're a musician, don't write a song about someone writing or performing a song.
If you're a chef, don't tell us how the sausage is made...

we don't want to know.
posted by 517 at 3:42 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


Why not?
posted by koeselitz at 4:29 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


If you're making a web filter, don't get all meta on us.
posted by mccarty.tim at 4:31 PM on January 29, 2010


The one basic rule of art

Leaving aside the fact that this performance here is somewhat a proof-of-concept... some of the best art is self-conscious.
posted by tybeet at 4:39 PM on January 29, 2010


A very cool collaboration. They contributed separately and layered on top of the piano track. piano -> drum -> bass -> guitar -> scratchboard -> vocal 1 -> vocal 2 -> vocal 3. It doesn't take away from the quality of the end product - which I LOVE - but it's not exactly the "look at what the Internet has done for us" revelation. We were doing this in the 80's by snailing each other cassettes and remixing. Again, though...very cool.

(And if I had to guess, the vocals went Herbal T -> Esna -> Dumbfoundead...just by their body language response to what they were hearing in the monitor.)
posted by ThusSpakeZarathustra at 5:31 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


First, this is not a jam by any definition.

And it's so generic... unchallenging... inoffensive... bland... saccharine... arg!

Must clear my palette with something confusing. ahhh... (warning: flashing lights).
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 11:30 PM on January 29, 2010 [2 favorites]


I wouldn't buy the album, but then again, I no longer have to. Thanks for posting.
posted by Samuel Farrow at 2:23 AM on January 30, 2010


This is pretty cool and stuff, but Kutiman is made of high potency pharmaceutical win. How did I miss that before?
posted by louche mustachio at 6:54 AM on January 30, 2010


I wouldn't exactly apply the word "jam session" to this, unless it's all collective improvisation or something.
posted by tehloki at 8:19 PM on January 30, 2010


words
jam session is two words
posted by tehloki at 8:19 PM on January 30, 2010


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