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David Lynch's A Goofy Movie
March 5, 2010 4:52 PM   Subscribe

David Lynch's A Goofy Movie (slyt)
posted by You Should See the Other Guy (32 comments total) 18 users marked this as a favorite

 
That was.... genuinely unsettling.
posted by brundlefly at 4:55 PM on March 5, 2010


So very Lynchian, so very great!
posted by uni verse at 5:02 PM on March 5, 2010


Cody Richeson to the Snow White Courtesy phone...
posted by hal9k at 5:05 PM on March 5, 2010


This is the second A Goofy Movie-related video I've seen today. Not sure how I feel about that.. but I feel great about this.
posted by june made him a gemini at 5:06 PM on March 5, 2010


I want to see Goofy do David Lynch now. On second thought never mind. Not into gay bestiality porn. Really I'm not. Stop looking at me like that!
posted by cjorgensen at 5:16 PM on March 5, 2010


Some other others are great too...

David Lynch's Dirty Dancing
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjvuCOlkO4E

David Lynch's Return Of The Jedi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KkeVi-4x30
posted by Hairy Lobster at 5:24 PM on March 5, 2010


Argh!
Now with properly formatted links:

David Lynch's Dirty Dancing

David Lynch's Return Of The Jedi
posted by Hairy Lobster at 5:25 PM on March 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


Warning to anyone wearing headphones, like me: something very loud and annoying happens 15s in.
posted by drjimmy11 at 5:26 PM on March 5, 2010


I like the David Lynch mashups much better than David Lynch.
posted by not_on_display at 5:36 PM on March 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


There are currently so many being creates that I'm sure one day I will grow tired of YouTube video mashups of x's y, where x is a director/genre and y is a title that doesn't typically doesn't go with x.

Today is definitely not that day.

(The fact that I'm posting this in a little iPhone box where above me one arrow leads to Penny Arcade and the other leads to Auschwitz adds to the unsettling feeling.)
posted by MCMikeNamara at 6:04 PM on March 5, 2010


Not a mashup, but I just came across this Lynch parody a few days ago:

David Lynch & Crispin Glover's: Big Blockbuster #1
posted by bobo123 at 6:14 PM on March 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


Lynch could do amazing things with a bit part with Tommy Wiseau, like in one of those "call me" mystery man moments from Lost Highway.

"Oh Hi there, I'm at your house right now, call me"
posted by chambers at 6:22 PM on March 5, 2010


Lynch could do amazing things with a bit part with Tommy Wiseau, like in one of those "call me" mystery man moments from Lost Highway.

Wiseau should really be a denizen of the Black Lodge. Lynch wouldn't even have to use backward-masking/ADR to make his voice/intonation sound strange. "I ded naht het hurr. I DED NAAAAAHT."

More germane to the topic: I always wanted Lynch to make a children's film, something with the same affirmative, pro-social vibe that The Straight Story had, but with the weird fantasy elements of his other movies, and aimed squarely at the elementary-age psyche. Lynch just seems like such a sunny, positive kind of guy in his books and interviews that I can't help but think that he might have his own Wizard of Oz (one of his favorite movies) to share with the world.
posted by Strange Interlude at 6:41 PM on March 5, 2010 [4 favorites]


They sort of work as Lynchian trailers (Dirty Dancing is by far the best), but I'd be interested to see someone actually take an entire narrative scene and reimagine it as David Lynch. The cuts here are much too quick; shots would need to be longer and to linger weirdly after the dialogue has been spoken, like everyone (including the actors) is waiting to find out what's next. In my opinion that's really where the creepiness comes in: staring too long at silent, fidgeting actors (or, like, a stoplight) with a vaguely ominous drone in the background.
posted by EL-O-ESS at 7:38 PM on March 5, 2010


Best parts of Lynch/Crispin:

"How much do you need?"
"4. million dollars"
"i'll give you 300"
(Crispins looks very exited)

and

"Is that a squirrel?"

"no, it's a penguin"
posted by djduckie at 7:59 PM on March 5, 2010


This was pretty good, but felt more like a Chris Nolan film than Lynch.
posted by Quantum's Deadly Fist at 8:20 PM on March 5, 2010


Sausages via the Kids In The Hall is a favorite LynchSpoof.
posted by Ron Thanagar at 8:26 PM on March 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


For anyone interested who hasn't seen these before: Not a spoof, but Lynch's own cartoon, Dumbland.
It's really dumb.
posted by zoinks at 8:42 PM on March 5, 2010


Big Blockbuster #2 has an eerily accurate spoof of Glover's "What Is It". Especially the "four hours later" note...
posted by FatherDagon at 8:51 PM on March 5, 2010


I don't want to be all 'I know far more about David Lynch than you can possibly imagine,' but to my eye all these Lynch parodies entirely miss what it is that Lynch does, and just go for vaguely weird with ominous soundtrack.
posted by shakespeherian at 9:13 PM on March 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


*claps*

I DO believe in David Lynch's A Goofy Movie!

*claps*

I DO believe in David Lynch's A Goofy Movie!

*claps*
posted by lekvar at 9:20 PM on March 5, 2010


My favorite Lynch thing.
posted by Ron Thanagar at 9:20 PM on March 5, 2010


This one, despite being really a pretty lazy editing job, effectively captures the creepy Lynch vibe: Three Men and a Baby.

I keep expecting Gutenberg to start screaming like a fucking madman and smash shit.
posted by Saxon Kane at 9:27 PM on March 5, 2010


I don't want to be all 'I know far more about David Lynch than you can possibly imagine,' but to my eye all these Lynch parodies entirely miss what it is that Lynch does, and just go for vaguely weird with ominous soundtrack.

I don't want to be all 'I find Art annoying,' but what exactly is it that Lynch does, aside from making vaguely weird films with ominous soundtracks?

No, I mean seriously. I would genuinely appreciate any explanation.
posted by Xezlec at 10:45 PM on March 5, 2010


Xezlec: "I don't want to be all 'I find Art annoying,' but what exactly is it that Lynch does, aside from making vaguely weird films with ominous soundtracks?

No, I mean seriously. I would genuinely appreciate any explanation.
"

That's probably a question that deserves a long and detailed answer, but if I were to try to sum it up, it would be something along the lines of "David Lynch makes films that are like dreams". His movies, at least to me, are unique n the way that they seem to make sense intuitively, even though if you try to understand them intellectually, they can in some cases be very difficult.

Mulholland Dr., for instance, is widely considered to be explainable as an extended dream sequence making up some 80% of the movie (I agree with this interpretation, in general), but most people don't pick up on that on the first viewings, so it's really hard to make sense of. But, appropriately, even though things don't totally connect, they make sense in a sort of oblique, intuitive way, much like things tend to do in dreams, and it's perfectly possible to really enjoy the movie without understanding it intellectually, because of this.

The other thing I think Lynch is uniquely good at is teasing out ominous meaning from seemingly mundane things. In Twin Peaks, there's a traffic light, and also a staircase with a ceiling fan over it, that mysteriously take on horrible significance. It's hard to explain exactly why, but it tends to work really well. This kind of stuff is also dream-like, of course.

I don't know if Lynch practicing Transcendental Meditation and whatnot has anything to do with it, but the way he makes films is unlike any other filmmaker I know, and seems to flow directly from the unconscious. To manage that without just making laughable crap (see also: Student Film) is a huge achievement in itself. Not a lot of people can pull it off.
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 2:57 AM on March 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


The most authentically Lynchian thing in that was the scene where adults are casually conversing, immersed in the hot tub, still wearing their white leather kid gloves.
posted by Shepherd at 3:47 AM on March 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


Mulholland Dr., for instance, is widely considered to be explainable as an extended dream sequence making up some 80% of the movie

Joakim, have you read this explanation of Mulholland Drive?
posted by You Should See the Other Guy at 7:30 AM on March 6, 2010


...that mysteriously take on horrible significance. It's hard to explain exactly why, but it tends to work really well.

For years now, I've been preaching this belief of mine that a movie is little more than a long, dressed-up music video. The music determines how you feel about each scene and event, and can determine largely whether the film is any good or not, almost independent of the quality of the writing and acting. So my instinctive answer to why an object takes on horrible significance is that there is ominous music playing.
posted by Xezlec at 8:26 AM on March 6, 2010


You Should See the Other Guy: "Mulholland Dr., for instance, is widely considered to be explainable as an extended dream sequence making up some 80% of the movie

Joakim, have you read this explanation of Mulholland Drive?
"

Yeah, I don't think I'd read that exact one, but that's a very good summary of the dream interpretation and its symbolism. While the general idea that most of the movie is a dream had already come to me, I think the first time I saw it formalized and defined was an article on Salon.com, which I see is also linked in the thread you link to, and I've seen several other explanations along the same lines.

But I agree, that's the most likely interpretation of what's going on in the movie. And it's a pretty amazing piece of filmmaking.
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 8:56 AM on March 6, 2010


No, I mean seriously. I would genuinely appreciate any explanation.

I'll give it a shot. Lynch began his filmmaking career really and genuinely by accident; he was a painter, and one day was working on a painting and got the idea in his head that he wanted to make a painting 'that moved,' and thus his first short film is an art installation of a looped animation projected onto six plaster casts of his face while a siren plays. A man who came to see this installation liked it so much that he asked Lynch to make him one, too, and gave him a cash advance, which Lynch used to buy his first camera. This is the genesis of Lynch as maker of motion pictures.

What David Lynch brings to film is a painter's sensibility inspired more by Francis Bacon than by Welles or Hitchcock (although Lynch is clearly a fan, and you can watch, over his career, as he becomes more familiar with the conventions of traditional narrative filmmaking). He's not coming at it from the place you expect-- he is, in a very certain way, using character and plot in the way that Chagall uses figures and objects in his paintings. There's a logic and reason to them, and they certainly aren't random or weird for weirdness' sake, but that logic and reason isn't one that follows traditional rules.

Like Joakim Ziegler says, Lynch films are incredibly dreamlike and intuitive. Images recur and gain significance and are linked for inarticulable reasons, motions slow and repeat until everything natural seems unnatural, characters are drawn in ways so specific that they go straight past quirky and become sinister. Unlike the Goofy video of the FPP, images aren't intercut to jar the senses or to lend frightening subtext to banal situations; with Lynch, situations are frightening most when they are banal.
posted by shakespeherian at 4:15 PM on March 6, 2010 [2 favorites]


Oh.
posted by Xezlec at 5:21 PM on March 6, 2010


Lynch films are incredibly dreamlike and intuitive. Images recur and gain significance and are linked for inarticulable reasons, motions slow and repeat until everything natural seems unnatural, characters are drawn in ways so specific that they go straight past quirky and become sinister.

This is an excellent description of Lynch's work.

Like you said, this Goofy video just blasts random bits of static and imagery at you. That's not Lynchian at all. It's actually the opposite: Lynch's films have the feeling of one thing flowing into the next, very much like a constantly mutating dream that switches between a good dream and a nightmare.
posted by nathancaswell at 10:28 AM on March 7, 2010


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