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Zombie Vs. Kids
October 16, 2010 7:40 PM   Subscribe

Japanese children fight valiently to protect their home from a zombie. There's no way this isn't the cutest thing you see all day. (Don't forget to turn subtitles on). Full 7 min video, albeit without subtitles.
posted by fizzzzzzzzzzzy (86 comments total) 30 users marked this as a favorite

 
see also
posted by yeoz at 7:47 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I was 100% sure this was going to be from the awesome Happiness of the Katakuris. But it isn't. And it's still awesome. Thz, fizzzz...
posted by koeselitz at 7:49 PM on October 16, 2010


I love "happiness of the katakuis"... best underrated thing ever..

that said... when did terrifying kids become "cute"...??? I can see where it could be funny, but I couldn't detach from the "poor frightened kids" grandparent mode..

/end cranky old guy
posted by HuronBob at 7:53 PM on October 16, 2010 [15 favorites]


That would have traumatized me at that age.
posted by five fresh fish at 7:54 PM on October 16, 2010 [7 favorites]


Flavor Flav is getting really desparate for attention.
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 7:57 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


desperate
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 7:58 PM on October 16, 2010


I like very much that zombies in Japan send letters ahead announcing that they will be assaulting your house. There is so much about Japanese culture that I do not get.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 7:58 PM on October 16, 2010 [23 favorites]


I guess humiliating game shows weren't enough.
posted by 3.2.3 at 8:01 PM on October 16, 2010


Child abuse is funny.
posted by 1000monkeys at 8:03 PM on October 16, 2010


"Cutest"? I'd say cruel and terrifying. The kids clearly didn't get that it was fake. They were scared to death! I work with kids that age, and I'd be pissed if anyone did something like that to them. What a horrible concept for a show.
posted by booksherpa at 8:03 PM on October 16, 2010 [16 favorites]


I feel sorry for the zombie.
posted by porpoise at 8:07 PM on October 16, 2010


3.2.3: "I guess humiliating game shows weren't enough"

Ooo, can you do a joke about panty vending machines next?
posted by ShawnStruck at 8:17 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


that was the strangest thing i have seen in my life
posted by angrycat at 8:21 PM on October 16, 2010


Nothing funnier than a genuinely traumatized little child, amirite?
posted by Aquaman at 8:23 PM on October 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Japan is wrong.
posted by fleetmouse at 8:27 PM on October 16, 2010


When it comes to terrifying children, I prefer the chain saw wake-up.
posted by nickyskye at 8:27 PM on October 16, 2010 [4 favorites]


Japanese kids are pretty damned stalwart. I suspect that not many American kids that age would do as well.

There's a Japanese TV show where they give little kids tasks that are way above their age level, and it's amazing how many of them manage to do them.

That said, the Japanese can be really cruel for LULZ. They're like a bipolar society.
posted by Jimmy Havok at 8:30 PM on October 16, 2010 [5 favorites]


Traumatized? What, are you kidding? They won! They beat the zombie!

Nothing makes a five year old feel like more of a badass than beating up a zombie.
posted by phooky at 8:34 PM on October 16, 2010 [21 favorites]


That was the most realistic depiction of a nightmare I've ever seen. The most poignant and heartbreaking detail was the children's attempt to use saran wrap against the monster. Totally insane.
posted by facetious at 8:40 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


I like very much that zombies in Japan send letters ahead announcing that they will be assaulting your house. There is so much about Japanese culture that I do not get.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 11:58 AM on October 17 [+] [!]

It was a pretty polite thing to do, but the zombie committed several faux pas in the house. First of all, he did not bring a gift for the family, and considering he was expecting the family to provide a meal, that's pretty inconsiderate.

Second, he did not take his shoes off upon entering the main house. Inside the entryway is fine, but in the house itself? Don't even get me started that he entered the bedroom with his shoes on.

I picked those two out with my (albeit limited) knowledge of Japanese customs and culture. I'm sure an expert could pick out the more nuanced ways the zombie disrespected and ultimately insulted this family.

(I bet he doesn't even send a thank you card.)
posted by gc at 8:43 PM on October 16, 2010 [37 favorites]


Kids get teased by other kids and poked by various cultural traditions and twists of fate. People have to face a lot of challenges as they grow up. In this scenario, they are presented with a big challenge that is rigged to work out in their favor! That would have been awesome for that boy. He got to be a real hero, and it was clear that was doing something for him. The girl seemed more trepidatious, but not paralyzed. A little scare can be actually kind of fun, and it's like any prank in that brief fear soon gives way to relief. It may even have had a lasting positive effect on their confidence in themselves.

Or maybe I'm totally wrong. I'm just saying, there are different ways to look at it.

With all that said, though, I agree that the audience's reactions to the kids' genuine stress was a little disconcerting at points.
posted by Xezlec at 8:52 PM on October 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


It is kind of messed up, but really, I don't think it is that bad. The kids were scared -- oh no! Let's make sure that children are never scared and always happy and prancing through flowers with puppies. The kids worked together, stood up to the reporter, stood up to a freaking zombie, and beat the hell out of it. Not a bad experience, really. I think that it is probably less traumatic than, say, your parents coming to your little league game and damn near bursting a blood vessel as they scream about every play and get into fights with parents on the opposing team, then yell at you on the drive home because you missed a crucial play at first base.
posted by Saxon Kane at 8:52 PM on October 16, 2010 [13 favorites]


Do people here really think they would have been traumatized by that when they were kids? Were you folks raised in Unicornland or something?
posted by 2N2222 at 8:56 PM on October 16, 2010 [21 favorites]


I'm really glad that they had the kids win in the end. That they didn't give up and admit that it was a guy in a mask (until later, presumably). Those kids defeated evil! They beat a zombie!
posted by maryr at 9:00 PM on October 16, 2010


Oh no, poor babies . . . ! I would be so proud of them if they were mine; but then, if they were mine, they would have come nowhere near this prank.

I'm reminded of being tiny myself. One Halloween night, I was with some kids who got to meet with a neighborhood lady who did a particularly scary, well-costumed witch act. We were all alone with her in the dark (not really, but it seemed that way) and she cackled and asked if we were terrified. I shouted, "No! No, I'm not! Because you're pretend!" I did that under repeated cackling and questioning, and stamped my foot too; and, of course, I was so scared of her I thought I was going to melt. I was puzzled when the witch merely said "Oh. Well," and changed the subject to candy. Later on, I realized I must have embarrassed the grownups with inopportune and ungrateful bravery, but by then I knew that children's entertainment is a tricky business.
posted by Countess Elena at 9:03 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


I have been a child that age, and I have raised children that age.

I would totally whoop the tail of ANYONE that would have pulled that stunt on me and mine. That was cruel, period.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 9:04 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


"Cutest"? I'd say cruel and terrifying. The kids clearly didn't get that it was fake. They were scared to death! I work with kids that age, and I'd be pissed if anyone did something like that to them. What a horrible concept for a show.

Scaring the shit out of children makes them behave.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:09 PM on October 16, 2010 [5 favorites]


It's more like the reporter is there to help them have the confidence to face their fears.. and in the end, by working together, they overcome an obstacle. It's actually quite beneficial, plus it's entertaining and cute for us grown ups.. in a dark sort of way ;)
posted by ReeMonster at 9:10 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


KokuRyu, that is wrong and hilarious, especially since the "demons" sound like Sweetums. (At the very end of the video, one of the little boys waves and says "bye bye" to the demons, which may be the single cutest thing I ever saw.)
posted by Countess Elena at 9:16 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Hilarious. I felt bad when they were crying, but I totally cheered when the kids used their secret Hokuto Shinken Thousand Punches technique near the end. But, if you tried this in some sort of psychological experiment it would probably be deemed highly unethical.
posted by Monster_Zero at 9:17 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Yeah, nieces and nephews, I'm the weird uncle.
posted by Dumsnill at 9:22 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


KokuRyu, that is wrong and hilarious, especially since the "demons" sound like Sweetums. (At the very end of the video, one of the little boys waves and says "bye bye" to the demons, which may be the single cutest thing I ever saw.)

In the old days the demons (called Namahage in Akita, but by different names in different communities along the Japan Sea coast) carried actual knives around, and would visit people's houses (the video clip seems to have been taken at a tourist trap of some kind).
posted by KokuRyu at 9:38 PM on October 16, 2010


Are we watching the same video? I saw the kids banding together to fight their fear and work together to defeat their bogeyman, instead of just being scared.

(Or what ReeMonster said)

To a lesser extent they recently did a drill like this at my son's Japanese daycare centre. A teacher dressed as a strange man and threatened the kids. The kids had been taught to immediately go and get a teacher. Some managed it - most broke down in tears. Cruel? No. Reality? Yes. A few tears is worth learning what you are capable of doing when you need to.
posted by gomichild at 9:40 PM on October 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


If you want to see kids terrified for laughs, check out this video from china (be sure to turn on closed captions). They have kids pretend to be police, and basically the girl is crying for most of the time.
posted by delmoi at 9:44 PM on October 16, 2010


Yeah, that was pretty much child abuse.

But I LOL'd. Guess it's good I don't want to have kids.
posted by bardic at 9:49 PM on October 16, 2010


What ill-trained children. What is this, home-schooled zombie defense? Don't they realize their main role should be luring the zombie to a kill area or taking out its lower joints?

This is irresponsible parenting at its worst here, folks.
posted by Graygorey at 9:57 PM on October 16, 2010 [7 favorites]



When it comes to terrifying children, I prefer the chain saw wake-up yt .


That's one of my favorite videos. I'm sure I'd be a bad, bad parent, but I can't watch these without laughing.
posted by Forktine at 10:00 PM on October 16, 2010


"Don't you dare say the zombie will get me! You don't help us at all! We are doing our best -- I will fight!"

Regardless of your opinion on whether this was cruel or good fun, that quote from the little boy, made through tears, was pretty damn inspirational and observant (that the reporter was totally worthless during a zombie attack).
posted by bfootdav at 10:04 PM on October 16, 2010 [17 favorites]


wassamatta you? I've been training my kids from birth to be ready to do battle with zombies, dragons, strangers, and roving republicans and I would be proud indeed if they worked together as well as these guys
posted by Redhush at 10:08 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Awesome kids. Laugh track? Not so awesome. 1st generation asians pull pranks on their kids all the time, at the child's expense.

"Haha bam, I just wanted to tell you before I died how much I love you and I never really cared about you getting straight A's and getting a degree from Harvard so much as whether or not you were happy."

Yeah thanks mom, that was hilarious.
posted by bam at 10:15 PM on October 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Cute? Adults terrorizing children is cute? Not in any sane universe.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 10:17 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


So today I took my five-year-olds down to the local man-made lake, craptacular "for-kids" fishing poles in hand, and I taught them to fish. I had to cast for them, sure, and bait the hook, and there was a lot of swinging-of-hooks around in the air when there shouldn't have been (them, not me) but they were for the most part very tense and on edge.

Then while we were talking about some random thing, my daughter noticed my son's line was being pulled, and he started reeling it in -- and for that minute in time, you have never seen the kind of teamwork and excitement and enthusiasm between the two of them. We hauled it out, talked about it as we released it, and by the third fish (we got six total in about an hour, five tilapia and a carp) I could have sworn the kids were five inches taller from the way they were strutting, and shouting "look, I got ANOTHER ONE!" to the people fishing a little ways away.

All they talked about on the way home, and through dinner, and going to bed, was the fishing trip and how much fun it was and how proud they were of each other and so on. I was prepared to go to sleep tonight feeling like a good dad, who had taught them something about their own capabilities and so forth and so on.

Then I saw this video, and now I'm going to bed thinking "aw, man, I could have done it with zombies instead of tilapia."
posted by davejay at 10:31 PM on October 16, 2010 [29 favorites]


I hope my potential future children are even anywhere near that badass at teamwork and problem-solving, and also setting zombie traps.
posted by so_gracefully at 10:57 PM on October 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


My wife is from Akita, and let me assure you that in the deep countryside, they still carry real cleavers and chant demonic voices and scare the bejeezus out of the little ones.

However, seeing these ancient rites and rituals (because that is what they are), can leave you with a profound feeling of connection to one's ancestors and something approaching religious awe.

At night you may hear the gutteral roar of「泣ぐコはいねがー」(nagu ko wa ine gaa?? - "Where are the crying children?") approaching your house...there may be demon-gods carrying torches, the orange flames glinting off their great blades and casting eerie shadows across the grotesquely-wrought crimson masks.

I once made the mistake of calling Namahage an 悪魔 (akuma - "demon") and was told that he is no such thing, but instead one of the typically complex Japanese deities that have no strict designation as either "good" or "evil." I was instructed by a woman in her 90s that he is a god of the harvest and hard work, and that's why dried rice stalks can be seen hanging from the eaves of shrines dedicated to him. He apparently only eats lazy and good-for-nothing children, so in fact he is a protects society, by weeding out the weak and useless.
posted by jet_manifesto at 11:03 PM on October 16, 2010 [22 favorites]


This got me to thinking about my typical Halloween costume, a rat hand puppet. I cover myself with a dark sheet and poke the fairly realistic rat puppet up over the edge of the table, and he grabs candy from a bowl and gives it to the trick-or-treaters.

Some of the little kids get really freaked out, but their parents encourage them to be brave and collect their candy. There was only one case where I had to show myself because the child was just too frightened.

That's sort of a junior version of what went on in the video, and to the same effect: the kids learn to overcome their fear.
posted by Jimmy Havok at 12:44 AM on October 17, 2010


I am now confident, for the first time ever, that I am qualified to be a parent. Or at the very least, more qualified than the kind of parents you find on the internet.
posted by marmaduke_yaverland at 1:16 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Shitty, exploitative TV is not a Japanese phenomenon.
posted by fullerine at 1:23 AM on October 17, 2010


Shitty, exploitative TV is not just a Japanese phenomenon.

FTFY
posted by 1000monkeys at 1:41 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I'm no fan of children but I'm not sure I get the "cute" part about scaring the hell out of little kids. This would definitely have given me nightmares for months at that age. I sometimes think adults forget what it was like to be a scared, over-imaginative kid. Or perhaps some of them never knew.
posted by Decani at 2:32 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Maybe they start off with rat puppets handing out candy, and work their way up to zombies invading one's home, eventually graduating to witnessing scenes of rape and dismemberment.
posted by five fresh fish at 2:53 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Maybe I've been in Japan too long, but I didn't see the "OMG CHILD ABUSE!!11one!" in this at all. I saw the kids frightened and then working together to win against the bad guy. But what do I know, I'm not a parent.
posted by snwod at 4:12 AM on October 17, 2010


Feeling guilty now, for having hanged the one toy my son is afraid of over the oven in order to dissuade him from his constant efforts to cook his other toys and miscellanea he found lying around in it.
posted by JeNeSaisQuoi at 4:39 AM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


I'm all for torturing toddlers myself. After all, they're going to torture you when they reach their teens, so you might as well get your lumps in first.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 5:37 AM on October 17, 2010


Tourists are warned to be mindful that the citizens that play the Namahage can sometimes get out of hand. In the past, the event had made the news when a drunken Namahage actor strolled into a public bath house and proceeded to rape several unsuspecting women.



posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 5:58 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Whoa! It's one of my favorite episodes from my favorite show. I don't get to watch it often because it's on late Friday night, but I did see this one when it aired originally - The show is 探偵ナイトスクープ (Tantei Knight Scoop) in case you want to find more silliness on youtube.

If anyone cares, the gist of the show is fans write in letters requesting help for all kinds of stuff, sometimes looking for help finding something/someone, sometimes for help with personal matters, sometimes serious issues, but more often ridiculous. They select a few letters each week, then have comedians pose as journalists or "detectives" to help resolve their request.

In this segment, the mom wrote a letter asking them to help her kids fight zombies because her kids like scary movies.

The clip omits the first part of the segment where the comedian spends the afternoon there, asking the kids if they would be scared by seeing monsters (and kids denying it), then the kids showing him all their ideas for warding off zombies if they were ever attacked (which is why there are all the booby traps when the zombie comes in, even though most don't work).

I think the segment is even funnier with the scared kids in contrast to their gung-ho attitude in his earlier interview, but it's still pretty great with just the zombie scene!
posted by p3t3 at 6:34 AM on October 17, 2010 [23 favorites]


It's interesting to think about cultural differences in teasing. Growing up in the South, my Arkansas family engaged in some pretty hardcore teasing of children and animals not terribly different from this Zombie fight here. I've lived in a lot of places since and the only place I've been with a similar teasing culture was an Ojibwe reservation. Seems like Japan is pretty similar as well.

I encountered the exact opposite in Sweden when I committed the terrible faux pas of dressing up our cat in a pink bonnet. My roommates were very upset and I noticed they were similarly upset by America's Funniest Home videos of animals being dressed up...
posted by melissam at 7:12 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


I teach at a preschool/kindergarten in Japan, and every year for Setsubun one teacher dresses up like an Oni and bursts into the classroom so the kids can chase them away by throwing soybeans and yelling at them.

My kids are all under three years old, younger than any of the kids in this video.


We spend a lot of time beforehand talking about Setsubun, and how you can throw beans at the Oni and he'll leave you alone, and we even have a sort of practice day where we throw beans at a life-sized picture of an Oni.


And they still get scared and cry when the Oni comes in, but they also try what we've taught them, and the ones who do throw their little packets of beans will go around for the rest of the day (sometimes the rest of the week) talking proudly about how brave they were.

In short, I think these kids will be just fine for having fought off a zombie.

also, more Japanese zombies (disclaimer: I am zombie death #1)
posted by emmling at 7:46 AM on October 17, 2010 [8 favorites]


I'm surprised how many people think this is OK. You should not trick kids into thinking they are in mortal danger. For me the traumatising part would be learning that it was all a trick so people could laugh at me.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 7:51 AM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


I have to say, when I saw this link I was hoping for Sora Aoi
posted by PeterMcDermott at 8:03 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Fire drills etc. involve scaring kids / pretend mortal danger.
posted by rosswald at 8:50 AM on October 17, 2010


Tourists are warned to be mindful that the citizens that play the Namahage can sometimes get out of hand. In the past, the event had made the news when a drunken Namahage actor strolled into a public bath house and proceeded to rape several unsuspecting women.

So this is just like Old Testament style religion then.
posted by juiceCake at 9:22 AM on October 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


St. Alias forgot to include something important at the end of the quote:

However tourists who look to plant the fear of the Namahage in their children can also take part by staying at an in that participates in the event. Tourists are warned to be mindful that the citizens that play the Namahage can sometimes get out of hand. In the past, the event had made the news when a drunken Namahage actor strolled into a public bath house and proceeded to rape several unsuspecting women.[citation needed]
posted by KokuRyu at 10:28 AM on October 17, 2010 [4 favorites]


I'm a parent of three and I'm totally okay with this. I don't think children (or teenagers for that matter) understand what mortal danger really is.

I believe The Brothers Grimm, and Mother Goose (who should be on the docket as well in any court case where you are suing these Nipponese folks for "child abuse") are tools designed to teach children that life is a mortally dangerous place.

If anything, this zombie was a little too easy to subdue. Stay with me: substitute the label "child molester" for "zombie" and think about the scenario.

But even that is too much, because this is play. Those kids were playing. And the adults were playing with them. As was mentioned earlier in the thread, they were set up for this, and it was a game for them. a scary game? Yup. So is Hide and Seek when you get right down to it.

If they were as terrified as some of you seem to think, would the boy be willing to touch the zombie? I don't think so.

They were playing with adults whom they trusted and at no time were they really in any "mortal danger."

My first thought was these children's parents have really drilled into these kids heads that saran wrap can be a dangerous suffocation risk.

Scary masks and threatening body language are a part of every child's development. I mean, what the fuck is Halloween? Do you think anyone who has taken their children to a haunted house should be arrested for abuse?

From the time my kids were able to move about in the world unencumbered by adult supervision, my wife and I taught the "don't take candy from strangers" line with a little extra. That is, even if threatened with physical harm (a gun, a knife, whatever) RUN. Run and scream. Bad guys don't want to draw attention to themselves with a gunshot, and even if you get ARE hit with a bullet, it will be better in the long run than ending up in some monster's basement.

Because there are monsters out there. Not zombies, but humans, who don't look scary at all, but will still eat you up.

Scary chasing games like this? Excellent preparation for the real world.
posted by valkane at 11:40 AM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


Please KokuRyu, we're trying to do some othering here. Leave your skepticism at home.
posted by Think_Long at 11:51 AM on October 17, 2010 [4 favorites]


St. Alias forgot to include something important at the end of the quote

Thank goodness you posted this. I've been struggling all afternoon, trying to imagine how one man could rape multiple women in a public bath. Were the others snoozing, while the first were getting raped? Did the drunken rapist threaten them all to get into a queue and await their turn? And what about the refactory period? How long could these multiple rapes take before someone got out and raised the alarm?
posted by PeterMcDermott at 11:53 AM on October 17, 2010 [3 favorites]


Bah, to all of those who say this will traumatize the kidlings. Bah, I say!

I have a solid, solid memory of a rushing through a haunted house (the best I've ever been in) to get through it as fast as possible. At the end, there was a mud room (small vestibule to protect against drafts, where muddy shoes & winter coats are kept). I waited there so I wouldn't look too cowardly to those waiting outside...

... which was my undoing. The Wolfman came in. I was trapped. I stepped back. I mustered all my courage, and said, "Hi!" (except it came out breathless and silent). He turned and went into the house. I rushed outside.

Best moment of my childhood. I totally kicked that werewolf's ass!
posted by IAmBroom at 12:05 PM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


Fire drills etc. involve scaring kids / pretend mortal danger.
posted by rosswald at 4:50 PM on October 17


I have to say it. This is a profoundly stupid remark.
posted by Decani at 12:53 PM on October 17, 2010 [5 favorites]


they're going to torture you when they reach their teens

On the other hand, you're going to be pretty dependent on them if they let you get old, and that lasts longer than the teens.
posted by Jimmy Havok at 1:02 PM on October 17, 2010


I kind of think there are enough scary things in the world without making little kids fight zombies. But then, I quit watching when the little boy was sobbing and saying "you didn't help us!" Perhaps it got cute and/or funny after that.
posted by hanncoll at 1:14 PM on October 17, 2010


I've been struggling all afternoon, trying to imagine how one man could rape multiple women in a public bath

The women obediently waited their turn as during childhood they had been brutally conditioned to do as they're told.
posted by fullerine at 1:24 PM on October 17, 2010


Did you just watch a different clip, fullerine? These kids appear to be getting brutally conditioned to fight back, not do as they're told.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 1:46 PM on October 17, 2010


At every age, kids become fearful as a matter of psychological development. Provoking fear, expressing affection, instilling confidence, cultivating patience—all of these have a place in every culture and manifest in different ways.

The shock and outrage expressed here seems to me ethnocentrism lapsing into xenophobia.

Children are raised differently in different nations, and what looks to you to be abuse may in fact be a healthy part of their socialization and enculturation.
posted by mistersquid at 1:46 PM on October 17, 2010


I'll be, here's another Japanese prank clip of monsters slipping into a house to terrify young chirrens. I don't think this one's as well thought out. The kids aren't "armed," and frankly, fun's fun, but I just wouldn't send a giant leering demon in a thong into the bedroom of a growing child. It is bound to have unforeseen effects on the child's psyche.
posted by Countess Elena at 1:59 PM on October 17, 2010


I have to say it. This is a profoundly stupid remark.
posted by Decani at 3:53 PM on October 17 [+] [!]

Ha, thats fine. I knew it was a bit... well its a terrible analogy. My only point was that the idea of scaring kids for whatever purpose isn't foreign to the US.
posted by rosswald at 2:21 PM on October 17, 2010


I'm at a loss to think of any time I, or any child I've known, has been terrified by a fire drill. And as an ex-teacher of primary grades, that's several hundred kids.
posted by five fresh fish at 2:28 PM on October 17, 2010


Did you just watch a different clip, fullerine? These kids appear to be getting brutally conditioned to fight back, not do as they're told.

Did you just read a different comment, PeterMcDermott? That was directed at St. Alia of the Bunnies' comment, not the kids in the video.
posted by IAmBroom at 4:06 PM on October 17, 2010


Great post, absolutely hilarious. I laughed so much I cried.

I'm a parent and all of you that wound up about 'child abuse' way too fucking uptight. Go read this comment.
posted by Argyle at 6:58 PM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


trying to imagine how one man could rape multiple women in a public bath

I was trying to figure out how they didn't suspect what was going on.
posted by Jimmy Havok at 7:13 PM on October 17, 2010


Zombie Roy Orbison in Clingfilm?
posted by theclaw at 10:23 PM on October 17, 2010


Were you folks raised in Unicornland or something?

Do you read the posts around here? Don't you know children can't be scared or be allowed to lose or face a serious challenge that mummy and daddy don't approve of? I knew before I came in here there'd be a groaning chorus of shrieking soft hearts. Well, the heck with 'em: great, funny, the kids will be fine, if not better for it. It is exactly this kind of stuff that my kids always reminisce about fondly. I've turned them into Grendels and sent them to raid the neighbors and transformed them into balaclava-wearing terrorists who kidnapped me in order to hostage me for lunch. I now regret never staging a zombie raid. It's like team building for children, only with zombies.

It's not really crazy abusive Japan breeding the serial killers and whatnot now, is it? Nope. OK, return to the rallying cries of the nanny-pack.
posted by umberto at 11:26 PM on October 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


I was trying to figure out how they didn't suspect what was going on.

Indeed. The use of the word unsuspecting is utterly bizarre. I imagine when people are raped or murdered or swindled they usually don't sit about suspecting they'll be raped or murdered or swindled unless they're in a war zone or close to a military base somewhere in the world.
posted by juiceCake at 1:20 AM on October 18, 2010


I remember the エロなまはげ (lewd Namahage) from Japanese tabloid news a few years ago.

FYI, the "multiple rape" of women in a public bath in 2008 consisted of a「酒に酔っていた」(drunken) Namahage 「暴走」running wild and「女湯に乱入お触り」(barging into a women's public path and touching some women).

Apparently,

女性らは警察に訴え出ていないが、被害者が申告していれば、強制わいせつ容疑に問われる可能性もある行為で、男鹿温泉郷協同組合の山本次夫組合長(73)は「女湯に入るなど、何百年も続くなまはげの歴史の中で前代未聞。言語道断だ」と激怒。このなまはげが所属していた町内会のなまはげグループについて、温泉郷内3年間出入り禁止とすることを決定した。

the victims decided not to report the crime to the police, but the head of the local hot spring resort association made a statement to the effect that: "In the hundreds of years of the Namahage tradition, this kind of outrageous behavior is unheard of and utterly inappropriate." The man involved has been banned from entering any hot springs for 3 years.

Terrible behavior for sure, but not rape.
posted by jet_manifesto at 2:45 AM on October 18, 2010 [5 favorites]


Knowing the story behind it makes me appreciate the video more. Thanks P3t3 for offering some actual context to the clip.
posted by codacorolla at 9:46 AM on October 18, 2010


"come here you stupid...I will destroy you"
posted by thsmchnekllsfascists at 10:57 AM on October 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


What fairy tales give the child is his first clear idea of the possible defeat of bogey. The baby has known the dragon intimately ever since he had an imagination. What the fairy tale provides for him is a St. George to kill the dragon. -- G.K. Chesterton
posted by Amanojaku at 11:34 AM on October 18, 2010 [4 favorites]


I encountered the exact opposite in Sweden when I committed the terrible faux pas of dressing up our cat in a pink bonnet. My roommates were very upset and I noticed they were similarly upset by America's Funniest Home videos of animals being dressed up

I think Swedes just have better taste in pet fashion.
posted by Saxon Kane at 2:20 PM on October 18, 2010


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