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Rachel Maddow, mixologist
November 28, 2010 12:40 PM   Subscribe

Rachel Maddow is an Old Fashioned sort of girl, at least when it comes to her taste in cocktails.

Rachel makes a Jack Rose cocktail.
Rachel makes a Champagne Cocktail.
Rachel discusses Piña Coladas on the Sporkful podcast, doesn't like them, and reworks the recipe into something worthwhile.
posted by device55 (65 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
Fun vids. Not sure I'd use Veuve Clicquot for cocktails; it's so good on its own.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 12:51 PM on November 28, 2010


She left out the egg white in the Jack Rose! (I watched w/ sound off, being in a cafe, so I don't know if she mentioned it.)
posted by kenko at 12:54 PM on November 28, 2010


Fun vids. Not sure I'd use Veuve Clicquot for cocktails; it's so good on its own.

That was a little product-placement-y, thought it's hard to miss that bright orange label.
posted by device55 at 12:57 PM on November 28, 2010


Next week, rush limbaugh shows us how to pick and smoke a fine cigar.

Brought to you by the national association of fancy talk show hosts claiming to represent americans.
posted by hal_c_on at 12:57 PM on November 28, 2010 [5 favorites]


I've enjoyed watching Rachel Maddow mix drinks on all kinds of shows. She's been on Jimmy Fallon and Diggnation mixing drinks, and she does drink-mixing segments on her own show not infrequently.

I'd just love to have her as a featured bartender at a party. She seems like she knows her stuff, plus she's great with conversation.
posted by hippybear at 12:57 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


Next week, rush limbaugh shows us how to pick and smoke a fine cigar.

Sure, why not, as long as he knows about cigars. Pretty sure I'd rather listen to him talk about the finer points of choosing a cigar than rant about politics.

Rachel Maddow has always seemed like someone who would fit in, socially and politically, around our kitchen table. Although clearly, she'd be on cocktail duty.
posted by rtha at 1:03 PM on November 28, 2010 [8 favorites]


Awesome!
posted by sveskemus at 1:05 PM on November 28, 2010


She left out the egg white in the Jack Rose!

A lot of people are unnecessarily skittish about raw eggs, whether in drinks , ceasar dressing or whatever.

Healthy adults have nothing to fear from a little raw egg.

In a cocktail the vigorous shaking will denature most of the protein (which makes the drink thicker and smoother), the ice and alcohol will take care of most of any microbes or bacteria, and your deadly, acidic gut will handle the rest.
posted by device55 at 1:05 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


Mmmmmm......tastes like the Weimar Republic!
posted by lalochezia at 1:07 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


Definitely need to point these out to my friend who's taking a cocktail class. Thanks for the pointer!
posted by immlass at 1:10 PM on November 28, 2010


You've got your wrapper, binder and filler. If all three components are from the same country, we call that a puro. Wrappers contribute much of the flavor of a cigar. Though darker than Cameroon or Cuban seed wrappers, maduro wrappers are generally sweeter than their lighter-colored counterparts. Shape and size also affect flavor. Larger ring gauges-cigars are measured in 64ths of an inch, i.e. a 50 ring gauge is 50/64 inch in diameter - generally smoke cooker than thinner cigars.

What, I though you wanted to talk about cigars?
posted by fixedgear at 1:10 PM on November 28, 2010 [6 favorites]


The filler of the cigar is also broken down into Seco, Viso, and Ligero, in ascending order of potency. These components may also come either from a single country or be a blend of tobacco of different nationalities. Skillful blending of these contributes to the overall balance, complexity, and body of the cigar. You want all the filler to be "long leaf," meaning that the cigar is constructed of whole tobacco leaves rather than shredded tobacco.

Also, it bears noting that the only way to make a good cigar is by hand. Machine-made cigars are plentiful, but machines need a consistent product and quality tobacco is anything but -- there is significant variation from leaf to leaf, and only a master roller can create a consistent product from such a variable material.

Sorry, couldn't resist. I could talk about cigars all day -- probably because that's what I do in my job. (I work in a cigar store which makes its own cigars.)
posted by Scientist at 1:22 PM on November 28, 2010 [5 favorites]


Oh gawd. Even without the egg, a good old-fashioned is worth its weight in...well, top-shelf likker, anyway.
posted by notsnot at 1:23 PM on November 28, 2010


Mmmmmm......tastes like the Weimar Republic!

Yes, because God knows, adults enjoying adult pleasures are a sure sign of decadence and decline!
posted by neroli at 1:46 PM on November 28, 2010 [4 favorites]


Ok, scientist, then please answer a question I've long had: how much of the desire for "cubans" is quality, and how much is hype/forbidden fruit? It seems odd to me that the US is pretty much the world capital of tobacco production otherwise but our cigars are evidently inferior.
posted by flaterik at 1:46 PM on November 28, 2010


Scientist! fpp! stat!
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 1:56 PM on November 28, 2010 [5 favorites]


Something always seemed a bit wrong with using quality-ingredient champagne in a cocktail. A Kir Royale is very nice indeed, but the rest seems like a bit of a waste.

Though the champagne orange juice as a wake-me-up on the plane is quite lovely. They don't still do that, do they? Those and tiny packets of salted almonds, memories of a more genteel time in economy class...
posted by Capt. Renault at 1:57 PM on November 28, 2010


Now that I live in the land of bourbon I'm going to have to try this. My dear departed dad used to drink these, though I believe he used a cherry as garnish rather than lemon.

One thing that's a bit confusing: Rachel said the Old Fashioned calls for 2 oz. of bourbon, but it looked like she used the 1.5 ounce side of the jigger twice.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.
posted by SteveInMaine at 2:01 PM on November 28, 2010


Brought to you by the national association of fancy talk show hosts claiming to represent americans.

More from the NAoFTSHCtRA

Jon Stewart teaches us to roll a j.
Maury Povich shows you how to put on a condom for once.
Jerry Springer's advanced chair-throwing class.
Jenny Jones' drum lessons (no seriously.)
posted by griphus at 2:04 PM on November 28, 2010 [2 favorites]


but it looked like she used the 1.5 ounce side of the jigger twice

Jiggers come in multiple sizes
posted by device55 at 2:08 PM on November 28, 2010


What, I though you wanted to talk about cigars?

Sorry, couldn't resist. I could talk about cigars all day...

In that case, pardon the derail, but how do I smoke a cigar? I mean, I know how to appreciate the aspects of a cigarette, but I'm not sure how to do so with a cigar, which is not inhaled.
posted by griphus at 2:10 PM on November 28, 2010


1. Light cigar with $100 bill.
2. Puff heavily on cigar making smacky noises.
3. Say "I say, old boy, this is a fine cigar."
4. Quaff from big-ass snifter of brandy.
5. Relax in giant overstuffed burgundy leather chair.
6. Have manservant fetch foot-pillow.
posted by Cookiebastard at 2:24 PM on November 28, 2010 [4 favorites]


I love me some Rachel Maddow, but when I am looking for resources on how to make cocktails, I turn to Robert Hess aka Drinkboy, who has been making a great collection of video shorts on not only how cocktails are made, but the history behind them as well:

Old Fashioned
Champagne Cocktail

Just be careful, his videos have caused me to sink a lot more money into my home bar than I ever thought I would.
posted by mrzarquon at 2:34 PM on November 28, 2010 [11 favorites]


Was it Limbaugh's apartment that was recently up for sale in the millions complete with gold-gilded murals? Ah yes, truly he represents of the common man.
posted by maryr at 2:37 PM on November 28, 2010


how do I smoke a cigar?

Purchase your cigar from a tobacconist. If you don't know what you'd like, ask someone at the tobacco shop. They will be happy to help. They may ask you what sort of flavors you like, or if you prefer red wine over white, or sweet to savory, or how you take your espresso. They will pick a cigar based upon this information. Don't be afraid to set a price limit, you can get a really good cigar for under $8. (after all you are setting fire to the cigar, no need to spend $40 on your first)

If this is your first cigar, you probably don't have a cigar cutter. Don't worry about it. The person at the tobacco shop will cut it for you if you ask. If you have the cigar cut at the store, smoke it soon.

With a little patience and care you can trim a cigar with a sharp paring or pen knife.

You will want some longish wooden matches or a lighter. Many people will tell you that lighters or some matches may impart a nasty flavor to the cigar and that you should only light a cigar with cedar or some such. This may be technically true, but I've never experienced any off flavor from a match or a lighter, certainly not after the first puff. If you have an extraordinarily sensitive palate then you may.

To begin, light a match or your lighter, and simply toast the end of the cigar lightly in the flame. Move the flame about the entire end so that it toasts evenly. You are drying out the tobacco and warming it up so that it will light evenly.

After a few seconds, the tobacco at the end will darken. Place the cigar in your mouth and using the same motion as before, move the flame about the end of the cigar as you draw in slowly and evenly. Try to light the end as evenly as possible. Neatness counts.

It may take a moment to fully light the end of the cigar. Don't worry, take your time. Just exhale, and continue to draw in slowly as you light the cigar.

Once lit, enjoy a long smooth draw of smoke into your mouth. Perhaps while tilting your head back, let the smoke linger in your mouth for a bit, and then exhale slowly. Wait for a moment. Enjoy the smell of the lit cigar in the room and the lingering taste of tobacco on your lips.

When ready take another draw.

You may need to relight your cigar at some point. Cigars are naturally sort of damp (not sopping wet, but not stone dry either) so don't be surprised. George Burns famously used cheap, nasty cigars in his act because they are very dry and stay lit like a rolled up newspaper.

Don't fuss with the ashes, and don't try to make a sport of creating a long column of ash. If you think it's ready to fall off, give it a light tap over the ash tray. If it doesn't fall off, it's not ready. Keep smoking.

When you've had enough, simply lay your cigar on the edge of the ash tray and allow it to burn it self out.

You will appreciate a cigar in three ways:

1. The flavor of the tobacco and the smoke
2. The aroma of the smoke and the tobacco as it is warmed by the lit end
3. The fact that you have tricked yourself into slowing down and appreciating 20 minutes of quiet while you smoke your cigar.
posted by device55 at 2:38 PM on November 28, 2010 [17 favorites]


My secret for pina coladas has always been frozen pineapple instead of ice, or possibly half and half depending on how much pineapple I've got. It takes a little more foresight, but on a really stupid hot summer evening, it's lovely. And they hold up with more substance for longer, because the pineapple itself still has some thickness, it doesn't all vanish when the ice melts. I hate making frozen drinks on muggy nights and having them melt before I've gotten the chance to drink it.

But I still use the coconut cream. I'm going to have to seriously consider trying this with coconut milk and simple syrup, now. (I am probably too cheap to fuss over orgeat.)
posted by gracedissolved at 2:41 PM on November 28, 2010


That was a little product-placement-y, thought it's hard to miss that bright orange label.

Duh. Her appearances in these videos are for Howdini.com or Grub Street and not on behalf of her role as commentator for MSNBC, etc.

These are likely paid appearances which include product endorsements. Duh.
posted by ericb at 2:44 PM on November 28, 2010


Not sure I'd use Veuve Clicquot for cocktails; it's so good on its own.

Ah, but what about Stolly-Bollys -- one of Patsy and Edina's favorite drinks?
posted by ericb at 2:53 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


50's Era Cocktails -- from Maddow's Air America radio show.
posted by ericb at 2:59 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


The media's cozy relationship with Big "Alcohol Used Exclusively In Fancy Cocktails" is literally the least of my worries.
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 2:59 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


device55: But which end do you cut and then which do you light/smoke?
posted by theredpen at 3:03 PM on November 28, 2010


She's been on Jimmy Fallon ...

Mixing Drinks with Rachel Maddow (video).

Mixing Drinks with Martha Stewart (video) -- in which she talks about cocktails and collecting classic mixology books as her favorite hobby, etc.

Rachel Maddow Makes A Gin Sling.
posted by ericb at 3:10 PM on November 28, 2010 [2 favorites]


*Jimmy Fallon Mixing Drinks with Rachel Maddow (video).*
posted by ericb at 3:13 PM on November 28, 2010


Trying not to derail the thread and have to go to work anyway, but I'll get working on that cigar FPP. Obviously I'm not the only person in this thread who's into cigars but if anybody wants to memail me I'm more than happy to talk about them.

I'm off to work to smoke some delicious stogies, and hopefully sell a few too. :-)
posted by Scientist at 3:25 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


Sorry for the derail, device55. I often enjoy spirits with my cigar, and occasionally a cocktail. I'm a fan of Rachael Maddow, too. But cigars...so much to cover, head, foot, whether to leave the band on...
posted by fixedgear at 3:33 PM on November 28, 2010


It is worth pointing out that scientist avoided a derail but gave me a fantastic answer to my question via mefimail. I would flag it as fantastic if I could!
posted by flaterik at 3:36 PM on November 28, 2010


fixedgear: but cigars are an awesome derail, and work well with cocktails.

theredpen: When you buy a cigar, one end will be cut perpendicular to the length of the cigar, this end you light. The other end will be sealed (the tobacco leaf wrapping will cover the entire end), this end you cut.
posted by device55 at 3:49 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


how much of the desire for "cubans" is quality, and how much is hype/forbidden fruit?

Sorry, I know it's a derail, But "Cuban" doesn't really carry the cahet it used to. Cuban cigars were once considered the best for a lot of reasons - Cuba had great soil and weather and invested many years in cultivating and curing high quality cigar tobacco.

Nowadays, Cuban tobacco seed has been taken out of Cuba and grown quite successfully in similar climates, most notably the Dominican Republic. So, Cuba doesn't have the lock on the market they used to.

(I smoke Cubans when I go to Canada, but there's no huge quality difference anymore. I actually prefer a lot of Dominicans over Cubans now.)
posted by Benny Andajetz at 3:52 PM on November 28, 2010 [3 favorites]


I vaguely remember having an old fashioned years ago, but I distinctly remember my friend splashing the bitters on at the end, as the last step. So maybe I haven't had a real old fashioned. I like that she mentioned rye; I find bourbon and Scotch too strong, but rye and Irish whiskey are as smooth as can be.

BTW, the cocktail that has hit the mainstream here in Japan is the highball. I dunno if that fad will continue through the cold-ass winter, though.
posted by zardoz at 4:00 PM on November 28, 2010


I like Old Fashioneds, with bourbon. I agree with the big ice cubes, but I'd probably use a bit more ice. I agree with the lemon oil; even a drop of juice is too much. Cherries I can take or leave. If I order one in a bar, I almost always receive a cherry.
posted by mrgrimm at 4:03 PM on November 28, 2010


Is it normal to refer to an orange peel as a "swathe" of orange? Because I liked that.
posted by Beardman at 4:10 PM on November 28, 2010


I have always had the problem, in making cocktails, of the shaker leaking when I shake it too vigorously. I could be doing it wrong, but I wonder if I just have a shitty shaker.
posted by kafziel at 4:19 PM on November 28, 2010


SCIENTIST! Do you work in that shop on Bourbon St.? Man I was having a good time and then, BAM, freshly rolled cigar. It was like the awesome cherry on a day of infinite awesomeness. Then we went to take a group photo because of the cigar and like thirty strangers crowded in to be a part of the shot. Best damned cigar I ever smoked.
posted by Baby_Balrog at 4:20 PM on November 28, 2010


I so love Rachel Maddow's passion for classic old-school cocktails. She may be the one woman this gay man would go straight for.

And how synchronistic that I should come upon this thread while enjoying a home made Old Fashioned? Although, I prefer the DrinkBoy method of simple syrup instead of sugar cube + water, and I use a big slice of orange peel which I stir well into the drink instead of the lemon she uses.

Also, in one of the other links here where she talks about 50s era cocktails she says she uses like 5 dashes of Angostura bitters in her Manhattans. Eek! That's way too much. Two, three at the most! And lately I've come to prefer Fee Brothers to Angostura - I use like two dashes of their regular "old fashioned" bitters, then another drop or two of their orange bitters.

Would love to compare notes with her someday on real, original Martinis, which used sweet vermouth, not dry. 2 oz. Ransom Old Tom Gin, 1 oz. Noilly Prat Rouge vermouth, dash of Fee Brothers orange bitters (or, lacking that, dash of Cointreau) - stir with ice and strain into cocktail glass. Amazing drink!
posted by dnash at 4:29 PM on November 28, 2010


As per Robert Hess, a cocktail was specifically any spirit mixed with water, sugar and bitters. Or from his research, the earliest recording of the drink of this style was in 1806:

"Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters..."

The whole article is an interesting read, but that part is what kind of made me light a fire under my butt about getting to know what is was about an old fashioned that I liked. It was a classification for a drink, not a drink itself.

Riffing with a bartender friend of mine, we made the tequila old fashioned, using agave nectar, smoked tequila, and orange bitters. And it was really damn good.

I like Hess's recipe over Rachel's because it is kind of idiot proof. Instead of a sugar cube he uses simple syrup, so you don't have to worry about muddling to make sure the sugar is dissolved (also when you start making cocktails more often, you end up with a bottle of simple syrup in your fridge at all times).

1/2 oz simple syrup (get the oxo mini measuring cups, I just noticed they make one that is stainless steel, which looks cooler than a jigger)
add your bitters
add 1/2 your ice
stir to chill the sugar and to mix the bitters with the ice.
peel an orange over the glass, twist the skin, throw it in the glass
add two ounces of bourbon or rye
add ice
stir some more
add your maraschino cherry (or if you are me, your dried bing cherry you soaked in 101 proof wild turkey rye)
posted by mrzarquon at 4:33 PM on November 28, 2010 [1 favorite]


And for more mixology stuff:

I've been pushing for a new cocktail (as in five years old) here in Portland, which I picked up over the summer from Imbibe magazine, so I'm sharing it here. It is called the Red Hook (not to be confused with the brewery).

2oz Wild Turkey Rye
1/2oz Punt e Mes
1/2oz Maraschino liqueur (I've been using luxardo)

Stir, serve up in a chilled martini glass.

You will want to play with the ratios a bit. My friend has been flaming an orange zest over it and it rounds out the cocktail nicely, but just those things mixed and with a cherry added, it's nice.

Wild Turkey Rye is 101, so it's extra kick rounds out the sweetness you get from the luxardo nicely.
posted by mrzarquon at 4:39 PM on November 28, 2010


or if you are me, your dried bing cherry you soaked in 101 proof wild turkey rye

Or, if you are me, your pitted cherry soaked in Luxardo liqueur.
posted by dnash at 4:44 PM on November 28, 2010


Next week, rush limbaugh shows us how to pick and smoke a fine cigar.

For stogie advice, I'd go to Bill Clinton, actually.
posted by jonmc at 5:02 PM on November 28, 2010 [4 favorites]


The Red Hook looks like a cross between a Fancy Free and a Manhattan (if you make the Manhattan with something like Carpano Antica).

Also quite nice and similar in spirit: Toronto.
posted by kenko at 5:41 PM on November 28, 2010


{always through away the band}
posted by clavdivs at 6:16 PM on November 28, 2010


Rachel discusses PiƱa Coladas on the Sporkful podcast, doesn't like them

How does she feel about getting caught in the rain?
posted by nanojath at 6:25 PM on November 28, 2010 [2 favorites]


Sherlock Holmes: Mind you Gruner, if you aspire to be accepted in English society, you would do well to remove the band from your Havana before lighting it. Otherwise, you'll be put down for a bounder.

Illustrious Client 4:00
posted by warbaby at 7:08 PM on November 28, 2010


1) I also heartily endorse drinkboy. If you have an interest in well made cocktails you should definitely start with him. If some day you want to see how other people do it then at least you'll be able to make informed decisions and easily spot the hacks.

2) Simple syrup. It makes life so much easier. Instead of using the shaking method that one of the videos above does, it's much faster and easier to heat up the sugar and water in a pot till the syrup disolves (but do not boil!), cool, then pour into some kind of handy container. Adding a little vodka might help preserve it. Keep in the fridge.

3) Instead of egg white (for vegans or people really worried about raw eggs) you can use gomme syrup which is a simple syrup made with gum arabic. It gives a very similar mouth feel that egg whites do. It can be tricky to find but there are good sources online.

4) Cocktail shakers. In the videos she uses a cobbler. As someone above mentioned, these can leak. Or the cap can fit on too tightly making it nearly impossible to remove after shaking. You can buy expensive ones that are far more likely to fit as they're supposed to but then you're still left with a straining system that I find rather cumbersome. There are two better options. One is the Boston shaker which looks intimidating at first but really isn't all that difficult after you've used one like five times. The other is a Parisian style shaker. These are similar to cobblers but have a much larger lid and a separate strainer. They're generally more expensive and better made and won't give you any problems. I use one designed by Arne Jacobsen which though very expensive works flawlessly (and is very classy).

5) Maraschino cherries. Don't use the ones you see at the store. Either make your own (multiple recipes here and online -- basically dried cherries soaked in brandy, whiskey, Luxardo, etc.) or buy them from Luxardo. These are expensive but oh so very good. All these options result in a very dull red color because they don't have the food coloring but the flavor makes it all worth it.

6) When I have an Old Fashioned I use one Luxardo cherry. If I'm making it for someone else I'll add an orange wheel.

7) Fresh lemon and lime juice should go without saying but it's so important and easy that it bears saying again.

8) When you can get fresh key limes try making a daiquiri with them (carefully strain for the seeds and the bitter rind which can easily make it into the drink) for one of the best cocktails I've ever had.

9) If Rachel also played backgammon then she would be the king shit. That said, if you're working your way into the cocktail world then it's time to pick up backgammon.

10) Martini. Gin, vermouth (sweet and/or dry (I prefer just dry)), and a dash or two of orange bitters. Stir. No olive. Lemon twist. I don't even refer to this as a martini anymore, it's just "drink" as in "I think I'll have a drink" and it's understood by one and all what this means.
posted by bfootdav at 7:51 PM on November 28, 2010 [3 favorites]


I am just returned from a lovely little cocktail cabinet behind a crepe window where I had the pleasure of a Oaxacan Old Fashioned on the Del Maguey Mescal Vida, agave syrup, and mole bitters. And it was a stimulating liquor.

dnash - I've been dashing celery bitters on my (sweet) Martinis lately, and it's delightful.
posted by Prince_of_Cups at 9:22 PM on November 28, 2010


device55: flagged as fantastic.
posted by mephron at 11:37 PM on November 28, 2010


For stogie advice, I'd go to Bill Clinton, actually.

The correct answer here is Michael Jordan.
posted by mrgrimm at 12:26 AM on November 29, 2010


{always through away the band}

Always remove the band, but save them and paste in your book.
posted by fixedgear at 2:32 AM on November 29, 2010


The wonderful blog Towleroad makes reference to this FPP today.
posted by ericb at 4:26 PM on November 29, 2010


Some wonderful comments on that blog. Yuck.
posted by fixedgear at 4:52 PM on November 29, 2010


Larger ring gauges-cigars are measured in 64ths of an inch, i.e. a 50 ring gauge is 50/64 inch in diameter - generally smoke cookercooler than thinner cigars.

FTFY, fixedgear. And - it's true. Girls come in to cigar shops, wanting to try their first cigar, and go for the cute little cigarillos, or the coronas, at most. What they want (but don't know they want) is the honking big churchills or robustos. (Boys are obsessed with looking macho in front of their friends, so they gravitate toward tht big gauges.)
posted by IAmBroom at 8:34 PM on November 29, 2010


...written while I enjoy my slightly dirty vodka martini, so it's on-topic, sorta.
posted by IAmBroom at 8:34 PM on November 29, 2010


but it looked like she used the 1.5 ounce side of the jigger twice

Jiggers come in multiple sizes


Only sort of, device55. Bar measuring cups called "jiggers" may come in multiple sizes, but a "jigger" is a precise measurement.

(Fortunately, or else recipes like my favorite, the Silver Fizz, would be hell to make. It's a rather precarious balance, IME.)
posted by IAmBroom at 8:48 PM on November 29, 2010


Brought to you by the national association of fancy talk show hosts claiming to represent americans.

Americans invented the cocktail, perfected it, and have reveled in it for over 200 years now.

Why do you hate America?
posted by Celsius1414 at 1:17 AM on November 30, 2010


It's more like hate for 'fancy talk show hosts claiming to represent americans.'
posted by fixedgear at 5:28 AM on November 30, 2010


Maddow Chastises Viewers For Bad Cocktail Etiquette.
posted by ericb at 12:17 PM on December 1, 2010


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