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The Heart of Darkness
January 14, 2011 1:45 PM   Subscribe

Joseph Conrad's forgotten novel about invaders from the Fourth Dimension.
posted by Artw (18 comments total) 34 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is, like, the best thing ever.
posted by Mister_A at 1:48 PM on January 14, 2011


He also wrote an Aliens tie-in.
posted by Artw at 1:54 PM on January 14, 2011 [1 favorite]


Heh.
posted by Mister_A at 1:56 PM on January 14, 2011


Does he have a zombie novel? I'd read a zombie novel.
posted by rtimmel at 2:00 PM on January 14, 2011


Just downloaded free from Project Gutenberg it and e-mailed it to my Kindle and now I can read it immediately. Technology is pretty cool sometimes.
posted by notmydesk at 2:02 PM on January 14, 2011 [3 favorites]


Oh, and this is one of those rare occasions where the comments are worth reading as well.

I've not read the actual book, but I can't help imagining it being like one of Lovecraft's more SF tinged stories, From Beyond or Herbert West, that sort of thing. Or maybe Colin Wilson in Lovecraftian mode. Or Fringe.
posted by Artw at 2:03 PM on January 14, 2011


Ooh that would be cool if it was like Fringe!
posted by Mister_A at 2:11 PM on January 14, 2011


Not forgotten by some of us...

As a Conrad die hard, I can't think of a good analogy for this FPP.

I guess it's like an FPP saying "Metallica's forgotten metal instrumental Call of Ktulu" with "Enter Sandman" as the title.

One's pleased to see attention being drawn to a delightful little nugget like this, but can't help getting a little bit clique-y about it.
posted by Bathtub Bobsled at 2:16 PM on January 14, 2011 [3 favorites]


The horror!
posted by Artw at 2:18 PM on January 14, 2011


notmydesk: Just downloaded free from Project Gutenberg ...

Also available on Archive.org, courtesy of Google books. Archive.org also has an audiobook version, though no note of the presentation quality. Archive.org also hosts Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard (the Aliens tie-in mentioned by Artw), also from Google books, also with an audiobook edition on Archive.org (part of LibriVox).
posted by filthy light thief at 2:24 PM on January 14, 2011


Buckaroo Banzai did the concept twice as well.
posted by adipocere at 2:42 PM on January 14, 2011 [1 favorite]


Bitchin'! Never heard of this and I always secretly considered myself a Conrad fan-boy/cheerleader. 'Spose I'll have to read it on the 'puter. Look forward to it. Cheers
posted by From Bklyn at 3:38 PM on January 14, 2011


I'm astonished he managed to write the entire article without mentioning the date of publication at all (1901 btw).
posted by anigbrowl at 3:46 PM on January 14, 2011 [1 favorite]


And let's not forget The Feast.
The hut in which slept the white man was on a clearing between the forest and the river. Silence, the silence murmurous and unquiet of a tropical night, brooded over the hut that, baked through by the sun, sweated a vapour beneath the cynical light of the stars. Mahamo lay rigid and watchful at the hut's mouth. In his upturned eyes, and along the polished surface of his lean body black and immobile, the stars were reflected, creating an illusion of themselves who are illusions. ...
posted by No-sword at 4:52 PM on January 14, 2011


This...this is just the best.

Thank you so much, Artw!
posted by merelyglib at 6:25 PM on January 14, 2011


The happiness, the happiness. Exploring the books.
posted by quarsan at 11:47 PM on January 14, 2011


notmydesk: Just downloaded free from Project Gutenberg ...

Currently, "The Inheritors" is #3 on the Project Gutenberg Top 100 ebooks yesterday.
posted by bobo123 at 12:08 PM on January 15, 2011


From Metafilter to Project Gutenberg to my computer to my Nook. Elapsed time: about a minute. The future is now.
posted by zardoz at 3:32 PM on January 15, 2011


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