Fermented Fruits and Vegetables: a Global Perspective
December 13, 2011 6:13 AM   Subscribe

Fermented Fruits and Vegetables: a Global Perspective. A comprehensive guide to pickled and fermented foods from around the world.
posted by Deathalicious (39 comments total) 65 users marked this as a favorite
 
*farts*
posted by i_cola at 6:15 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Wow, this is pretty exhaustive. I like it.
posted by Eekacat at 6:17 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Flow Diagram: Go to Korean Restaurant -> Eat all the Kimchi -> More Kimchi magically appears -> Goto 2.
posted by Wolfdog at 6:19 AM on December 13, 2011 [6 favorites]


Oh my God. Thank you, Deathalicious!

Runs off to clean out pickling crock.
posted by MonkeyToes at 6:21 AM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


Very useful information. I've been meaning to update my toilet-bowl hootch recipe for my next stretch.
posted by item at 6:23 AM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


This is awesome. Thank you.
posted by gauche at 6:26 AM on December 13, 2011


Kombucha, Kefir, Yoghurt¿ Why are none of those in there? Just beer and pickling. Who wrote this, a German?
posted by Napierzaza at 6:33 AM on December 13, 2011 [3 favorites]


I don't see a damn thing on pickled watermelon and with a bit of feta on the side so good
posted by griphus at 6:36 AM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


Upon further review, this list is really, really heavily weighed toward pickled products from non-Western countries.
posted by griphus at 6:41 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Napierzaza: "Kombucha, Kefir, Yoghurt¿ Why are none of those in there? Just beer and pickling. Who wrote this, a German?"

Because the title is Fermented Fruits and Vegetables. For yogurt or kefir perhaps you'd be interested in The technology of traditional milk products in developing countries.

Also, I know it's considered gauche to moderate one's own thread or to steer the conversation, but where are the pickle recipes, dammit?!?
posted by Deathalicious at 6:47 AM on December 13, 2011 [4 favorites]


Tempoyak (pickled durian)

Seems to me you wouldn't want to risk angering a durian by pickling it. Yikes.
posted by orme at 6:47 AM on December 13, 2011 [8 favorites]


Well, the title seems to be Fermented Frutis and Vegetables. Frutis are, by definition, foreign.
posted by Wolfdog at 6:54 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


orme: Nothing, including a passage through your digestive tract, can make Durian smell worse.
posted by Grimgrin at 6:56 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


No eggs?
posted by jonmc at 7:08 AM on December 13, 2011


johnmc - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, DAMNIT

I kid, I kid.
posted by brand-gnu at 7:16 AM on December 13, 2011


Egg is animal fruit.
posted by ob at 7:21 AM on December 13, 2011 [6 favorites]


or is a fruit a plant egg?
posted by elizardbits at 7:33 AM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


Achar
Acar
Achar
posted by infini at 7:36 AM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Jesus, this is absolutely fabulous!
posted by OmieWise at 7:39 AM on December 13, 2011


Heh. I have been told that pickled watermelon is tasty.
posted by jonmc at 7:39 AM on December 13, 2011


So....where the hell are the recipes?

And no mention of dilly beans?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:53 AM on December 13, 2011


I recently read this now-paywalled article which is largely about fermented food and this guy, as reprinted in this book.

I thought the book and the article were both well worth one's time.
posted by Western Infidels at 8:12 AM on December 13, 2011




Your head? My links were all recipes starting with fish pickle (yummy) and ending with a bunch of mango chutneys...
posted by infini at 8:13 AM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


To piggyback on Deathalicious's links:

Seriously, preserved lemons are damn useful. They often get mentioned as "a condiment for Moroccan cooking", but I've used them as quick-and-easy seasoning for roast chicken and broiled fish. (There's this recipe I have where you chop up potatoes, toss them in olive oil, then dump them in a roasting pan -- then take a couple of the preserved lemon quarters, chop them up, and tuck them in among the potatoes, then lay the parts of a cut-up whole chicken on top of that and roast the whole shebang. It's DELICIOUS, and only uses 3 ingredients.)

And as for sour pickles, they're way easier than you'd think. (Especially if you cheat and use vinegar rather than letting it sit in brine.)

There's also pickled turnips (called "lift" in Arabic), pickled daikon and carrots, and pickling ginger or garlic keeps it on hand for a long time.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:56 AM on December 13, 2011 [6 favorites]


*skims table of contents*

*gets as far as "banana beer"*

*puts thread down, backs away slowly*


This actually looks really neat. Thanks!
posted by amy lecteur at 9:02 AM on December 13, 2011


Maangchi's easy kim chi recipe which includes video instruction for extra help.
posted by vespabelle at 9:15 AM on December 13, 2011


I just un-crocked my first batch of homemade sauerkraut. It was really yummy. It had a sort of indescribable savory flavor that you don't get in the refrigerated jarred sauerkraut. Tonight the next batch is going in the crock -- red cabbage and honeycrisp apples, which I will somehow work into a holiday dinner.
posted by mudpuppie at 11:05 AM on December 13, 2011 [5 favorites]


mudpuppie, you can't say that and not either describe or link to a recipe.
posted by Deathalicious at 12:16 PM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


infini: "Your head? My links were all recipes starting with fish pickle (yummy) and ending with a bunch of mango chutneys..."

I'm sorry, I thought you were sneezing.
posted by Deathalicious at 12:17 PM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


I just un-crocked my first batch of homemade sauerkraut.

Congratulations, and yes, there's no comparison between homemade and bagged. It's a long time until next cabbage harvest, but I'll be busting out a quart of kraut for New Year's day.

Red cabbage and apples sounds really good., btw.
posted by MonkeyToes at 12:24 PM on December 13, 2011


mudpuppie, you can't say that and not either describe or link to a recipe.

That's the beauty, though, is that you don't need a recipe. You use about three tablespoons of salt for five pounds of cabbage.

1. Shred cabbage. I cut the head into eighths first, the cut horizontally for small, thin shreds. You can also use a mandoline or a food processor, but I find the knife method just as easy.

2. Periodically clear off the cutting board and put your cabbage into a crock or large jar. (I have a 1 gallon pickling crock. Any large ceramic or glass container will do. Don't use plastic or metal.) As you add cabbage to the crock, sprinkle salt over the surface. Then, lovingly caress, massage, and rub your cabbage between your clean little hands. It will start to exude water. Repeat as you shred more cabbage and add it to the crock. Punch it down to bring up the liquid level.

3. After all of the salt and cabbage are in the crock, let it sit for up to several hours, punching it down periodically to bring out more liquid. If your cabbage is very fresh, the liquid that comes out of the cabbage should soon cover the cabbage. You might have to punch it down repeatedly. If after 4 or 5 hours you still don't have enough liquid, add some very salty water to cover.

4. Place a small plate or bowl on the surface of the cabbage. (You can also use whole cabbage leaves. I've read that some cultures use rye bread, but haven't tried it.)

5. Place a 1-gallong ziptop bag onto the surface of the cabbage. Fill it with salted water, then seal. (You want it to be briny water in case the bag leaks.) This should keep the cabbage submerged.

6. Store in a dark place at room temperature (no less than 65F) for 1 to 4 weeks. Taste as you go, and eat it when it reaches your preferred level of sour. It will begin to smell sour after 4 or 5 days. Make sure that the cabbage is not exposed to air. (That's your ziploc's job.) If any does become exposed and mold forms, remove it at once. White stuff on the surface of the liquid is probably harmless yeast. If you start to see any alarming colors form and the cabbage begins to smell off, you'll probably want to toss it and start over. (Didn't happen to me.)

You can use any kind of cabbage, and you can add other flavorings at will: Caraway, juniper, apple are all things I'm itching to try.

After it's ready, store it in the fridge. It will most likely need to be rinsed before eating, as it's pretty salty straight out of the brine. A short cold water soak and rinse will take care of this.
posted by mudpuppie at 2:24 PM on December 13, 2011 [7 favorites]


Awesome resource, thanks! I started reading it (of course in the alcohol section) and saw the usual fruits and then...cashew wine? No way...there is no way that cashew wine can exist and I've never even heard of it...and how do you turn a nut into wine? (wikipedia-ing) THERE ARE CASHEW APPLES!? And a 500m wide cashew tree...you learn something new every day...
posted by nTeleKy at 2:41 PM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


That's the beauty, though, is that you don't need a recipe. You use about three tablespoons of salt for five pounds of cabbage.

Never in my life will I make this but you are favorited on principle.
posted by jeremias at 2:59 PM on December 13, 2011


jeremias, you should make it. It's really the easiest thing in the world. I love to add garlic to mine, and I do not like to rinse it before eating.
posted by 200burritos at 3:35 PM on December 13, 2011


there is no way that cashew wine can exist and I've never even heard of it...and how do you turn a nut into wine? (wikipedia-ing) THERE ARE CASHEW APPLES!? And a 500m wide cashew tree...you learn something new every day...
posted by nTeleKy at 2:41 PM on December 13


You've never heard of it because everyone who has ever drunk it is either still passed out, or rolling around on the ground under a very large tree while trying to remember just what the hell happened.
posted by Ahab at 7:05 PM on December 13, 2011


What timing! Because of my new love for all things pickled and fermented (sourdough, kimchi, pritnear any veggie or fruit in salt ... salted kumquats rock) I thought about asking for non traditional eg: non western pickle recipes on the green. Muchas gracias.
posted by squeak at 9:29 PM on December 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


Then just woken up after 27 years to post here - cashewnut liquor (Feni or Fenny) is the local hooch in Goa and it was cheap the year I was a sophomore in college. That's really all I remember tbh.
posted by infini at 9:30 PM on December 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Couple weeks ago, I made Giardiniera according to this recipe. I added sliced fennel and would kick up the spice a bit next time, but it's pretty much spot on.
posted by gauche at 2:47 PM on December 14, 2011


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