But "MMMBop" might motivate them to walk into the light ...
March 22, 2017 9:53 AM   Subscribe

New York Presbyterian provides a Spotify playlist of 100 songs to do CPR to, including the eponom-appropriate "I Will Survive". Obligatory "Office" link.
posted by WCityMike (25 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite
 
List for non-Spotify people available here.
posted by Etrigan at 10:02 AM on March 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


My mother, who was a neonatal resident back in the day, has always hated hearing the song "Another One Bites the Dust" because it not only provides the correct rhythm, but came out on the radio during a time of particularly high infant mortality at her hospital.
posted by Countess Elena at 10:04 AM on March 22, 2017 [5 favorites]


I recommend
posted by Wolfdog at 10:05 AM on March 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


Yeah; you can more or less divide EMS personnel into optimistic and cynical camps based on whether they use "I Will Survive" or "Another One Bites the Dust."
posted by fifthrider at 10:15 AM on March 22, 2017 [9 favorites]


including the eponom-appropriate "I Will Survive"

Stayin Alive is far more appropriate in both name and BPM.
posted by Talez at 10:27 AM on March 22, 2017 [7 favorites]


Which is why it's first on the playlist.
posted by NoxAeternum at 10:33 AM on March 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


Okay, so if I get to the end of the playlist and they haven't revived, they're definitely dead, right?
posted by Strange Interlude at 10:36 AM on March 22, 2017 [10 favorites]


Vinnie Jones gives a full walk through of what to do, for the British Heart Foundation, to Stayin' Alive.
posted by threetwentytwo at 10:39 AM on March 22, 2017 [6 favorites]


"At first (compress) I was afraid, I was petrified, kept think(compressing)ing I could never live without you by my side..."
posted by tobascodagama at 11:20 AM on March 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


I thought there'd be 60 more songs. SAD!
posted by mean square error at 12:14 PM on March 22, 2017


Okay, so if I get to the end of the playlist and they haven't revived, they're definitely dead, right?

Once you begin CPR, continue until:
* You see an obvious sign of life, such as breathing.
* An AED is available and ready to use.
* Another trained responder or EMS personnel take over.
* You are too exhausted to continue.
* The scene becomes unsafe.
posted by radwolf76 at 1:27 PM on March 22, 2017 [5 favorites]


They should make MedicAlert bracelets that let you specify which song you want to be CPR'd to. I'll be damned if I'm going to get pulled away from the light by The Black Crowes, it's Otis or DNR, man.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 1:32 PM on March 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


It invites the question: Is 100 BPM the optimum tempo for a pop song?
posted by DrAstroZoom at 1:37 PM on March 22, 2017


AEDs really should play music at you for tempo, or at least give you some metronomic ticking. A lot of people, even trained people, have trouble doing compressions appropriately aggressively. It's incredibly tiring to do it right. Remember to switch compressors every couple of minutes!

I work in an ED. I can't emphasize enough how important high-quality bystander chest compressions are. Nothing we do after arrival is as important as high-quality compressions in the field and while the patient is enroute to us. When a coding patient comes into the ED having had excellent compressions prior to EMS arrival, we have a shot at getting them back, depending on causative pathology and patient age and comorbidities. If they've had poor or no compressions for a few minutes, they're generally going to be toast.
posted by killdevil at 1:49 PM on March 22, 2017 [9 favorites]


I have the Red Cross emergency First Aid app on my phone. It would be cool (and maybe even useful) if the CPR guide had a metronome.
posted by The corpse in the library at 1:53 PM on March 22, 2017 [3 favorites]


"Yeah; you can more or less divide EMS personnel into optimistic and cynical camps based on whether they use "I Will Survive" or "Another One Bites the Dust."" -
You win the internet today. I was told by an instructor that "Another One Bites the Dust" probably might not be the best song choice.
posted by AJScease at 3:47 PM on March 22, 2017


They play an exceptionally repetitive lullaby over the PA system in my hospital when a baby is born upstairs in Labor and Delivery. Nice for the new parents to hear I suppose, but it drives employees mildly crazy. One of my more cynical and less politically correct coworkers has proposed substituting "Welcome to the Jungle" for the lullaby. "Another One Bites The Dust" would be a nice bookend to neonatal Guns N' Roses.
posted by killdevil at 8:10 PM on March 22, 2017


Micro McGee was resuscitated by trained CPR responders when he was 18 months old; sing any damn song you like, just get the training.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 10:10 PM on March 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


One of the most common problems with bystander CPR is not pushing hard enough. One thing I wonder is, do any AEDs include a pressure-sensitive mat that could light up green if you're giving adequate pressure to your compressions? For that matter, pressure an effective way to gauge effectiveness or is displacement better?
posted by tclark at 8:41 AM on March 23, 2017


do any AEDs include a pressure-sensitive mat

Accelerometer based solutions would appear to exist.
posted by 1head2arms2legs at 11:31 AM on March 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


The thing is, if you have an AED, you don't need to be doing CPR. But the idea is sound, and it would be really handy if you could fit both a metronome and an accelerometer into a device small and cheap enough that you can put it into just about any office's first aid kit.
posted by tobascodagama at 11:43 AM on March 23, 2017


The thing is, if you have an AED, you don't need to be doing CPR.
This is not correct. An AED will only be helpful for a shockable rhythm- ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Asystole (flat line) requires chest compressions.
posted by brevator at 5:55 PM on March 23, 2017 [2 favorites]


But for someone who's a bystander who's trying to do the best they can until an ambulance shows up, do CPR until you get an AED and then switch to the AED, right?
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:48 PM on March 23, 2017


But for someone who's a bystander who's trying to do the best they can until an ambulance shows up, do CPR until you get an AED and then switch to the AED, right?


Once an AED arrives, one should place it on the patient and follow the directions it provides. It's not "switching" to the AED-- the AED becomes incorporated into the CPR algorithm. Analyze, shock (if directed), continue CPR for 2 minutes. Lather, rinse, repeat until return of circulation or medical futility is determined.
posted by brevator at 12:10 PM on March 24, 2017 [2 favorites]


And of course, the most important part of the whole process, the very first step, making sure that the ambulance is on the way in the first place, once you know you need one. In crowded public spaces, if you are going to start into the CPR routine, it's not enough to shout "someone call an ambulance!" -- Pick one person signal them out, make sure they're calling 911 and that they know to tell you when the ambulance is on the way. Pick a second person to fetch the AED.
posted by radwolf76 at 5:44 PM on March 24, 2017 [1 favorite]


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