Put some cheese on it
January 9, 2019 12:05 PM   Subscribe

I’ll Fight Anyone Who Says You Shouldn’t Put Cheese on Your Ramyun: "It was like a mangled version of Korean mac and cheese, spicy and tangy... A bowl of ramen at Ramen Shop in Oakland will cost you nearly twenty American dollars. You are paying for the ambiance, and for what their website calls “artistic, organic, and sustainable ramen.” But maybe you don’t want that kind of ramen."
Roy Choi’s instant ramen recipe introduced the notion to (and horrified some of) the wider American public. Cheese-flavored ramen packets.
Korean recipes incorporating cheese include Buldak (fire chicken) with cheese | Tteokbokki (spicy rice cakes) with cheese | Ram’ & Cheese | Kimchi Mac & Cheese | Budaejjigae (Army base stew) historically includes a slice of American cheese, given its origins.
posted by spamandkimchi (56 comments total) 31 users marked this as a favorite
 
I have been eating ramen with Parmesan cheese and butter since I was in college in the early 80's. The recipe also works with rice instead of ramen. That said, I'm horrified at the idea of having a Kraft single on top of soupy ramen, but to each their own :).
posted by elmay at 12:17 PM on January 9


People will wait hours for a bowl of ramen?!? I love ramen but on the list of "things I will wait hours for," it's really low.
posted by The corpse in the library at 12:20 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


I wish ramen would go back to what it was for me as a kid: comfort food, something for the dark night of the soul, a thing to soak up your regrets and get you through a rough day. For me, one type of ramen has always remained its same, humble self. And you don’t go to a fancy restaurant for it. You go to an Asian market and look for the deep red package, with its giant Hangul characters; its promise of spice and comfort. You go for Shin Ramyun.

It was solely by chance that I stumbled across this as a student in a small asian grocery store near where I lived. Other instant ramens are just not quite...it for me since that discovery.

Shin Ramyun with cheese, egg, and green onion is still my preferred way to medicate myself after a trying day. Sometimes I don’t even bother with the egg or green onion; instead, I just go for the cheese, broth, and noodles.

Many years on, dare I up the ante with cheese?

I know many people who prefer Shin Black to the original flavor, but they’re wrong. It tastes fine, but it’s neither as spicy nor as comforting as the original flavor.

I can empathize with both sides of this divide.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 12:23 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


I can confirm that buldak is delicious and very easy to execute. It’s one of our favorite lazy dinners. The recipe above looks great, but we usually rely on Maangchi’s recipe.
posted by faineg at 12:24 PM on January 9


Excuse me, Samyang Carbo Ramen (not the cheese Buldak, which isn't as good) is delicious, and I will fight anyone who says otherwise.
posted by praemunire at 12:25 PM on January 9


My one experience with this is cheese flavored cup noodle. I guess I am a philistine but I thought it was not delicious in the slightest. I had it probably ten years ago now and still remember the intense dismay.
posted by potrzebie at 12:25 PM on January 9


Also: I recently sampled tomato cheese ramen with basil and pork at Kyushu Ramen Kio Dojima in Osaka, and it was absolutely delicious. A perfect Italian-Japanese comfort food. Pizza-ramen, if you will.
posted by faineg at 12:31 PM on January 9


Ramen Shop is a place where you can expect to wait in line for several hours

You haven’t had to wait in line for Ramen Shop for 2 or so years since they expanded. The new Soba Noddle in West Oakland however...

A bowl of ramen at Ramen Shop in Oakland will cost you nearly twenty American dollars

Why is the author comparing pricing for labor intensive product that is uncommon experience to Americans to mass-produced junk food staple of Japan? Also the Ramen Shop website does not show a $20 bowl of ramen right now.

Maybe he can compare the Red Delcious apples of his childhood lunch bag to the fresh squeezed orange juice from Berkeley Bowl next?
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 12:35 PM on January 9 [11 favorites]


Hello.
posted by Wordshore at 12:35 PM on January 9 [6 favorites]


> People will wait hours for a bowl of ramen?!? I love ramen but on the list of "things I will wait hours for," it's really low.

I've had ramen worth waiting hours for. Some of the best ramen I've ever had was in Seoul, in a Japanese ramen joint in the Hongdae district. That's right, Japanese ramen in Korea. Korean instant ramen is better than Japanese instant ramen, but Japanese fresh ramen is better than Korean fresh ramen. Fight me.

At home my usual thing is to add one or two of the following to my instant ramen: A raw egg, chopped green onions, a slice of American cheese, or sliced rice cake. There was a Korean diner in Ann Arbor I used to go to which would drop a couple-few gyoza into a bowl of ramen on request. Ramen doesn't have to be a meal when it can be the base ingredient for a much better meal.
posted by ardgedee at 12:36 PM on January 9 [9 favorites]


I'll wait in line for hours to fight anyone who fights over ramen.
posted by Liquidwolf at 12:38 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


Wait in line forever if you want if that means the line at Zachary’s is shorter.
posted by greermahoney at 12:40 PM on January 9 [2 favorites]


Budaejjigae is one of the finest dishes ever created by our species here on earth. One of the restaurants here in Grand Rapids serves it, at it was love at first taste.
posted by JohnFromGR at 12:47 PM on January 9 [4 favorites]


I get salty cheese on my boba tea now, American cheese on ramen seems no stranger.
posted by GuyZero at 1:11 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


LOL, GuyZero, I know this is a bit of a pivot from the "cheese on my ramyun wtf," but I finally got to try the cheese tea thing and I think the name causes way more drama than is actually warranted. When I first heard of "cheese tea," it was with zero context, just as a menu item at a boba place, so I was like, "... okay, cheese on my tea. Is this cheddar? Roquefort? Mozzarella? Stilton?" Turned out it was just cream cheese, so you're basically putting really stiff whipped cream on your tea, no biggie, I put cream in tea all the time. Now I'm looking forward to more cheese tea options on the menu at Boston boba places!
posted by Pandora Kouti at 1:46 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


Shin Ramyun is absolutely amazing.

I discovered it at work last year, and I loved it so much that when I was laid up for surgery, I ordered a case of the stuff. I don't eat it with cheese, but bolstering it with some leftover rotisserie chicken and fresh veggies makes for a very satisfying meal.
posted by spinifex23 at 2:05 PM on January 9


People will wait hours for a bowl of ramen?!? I love ramen but on the list of "things I will wait hours for," it's really low.

That's the artisanal ramen made fresh in limited quantities and in NYC can cost $20 a bowl. I visited Kyoto a few years back and saw Japanese people waiting patiently in front of ramen and soba shops, totally normal and acceptable thing to do for a food centric culture etc.
posted by polymodus at 2:09 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


Turned out it was just cream cheese, so you're basically putting really stiff whipped cream on your tea, no biggie

Yeah its not even cream cheese, it's like tangy stiff cream - it's maybe more clotted cream than whipped cream but yeah, the name is way crazier than the actual product. Which I suspect is the case of cheese ramen.
posted by GuyZero at 2:09 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


If I could still eat cheese, I'd nom the hell out of ALL THE CHEESE RAMEN damn it. *cries*
posted by Space Kitty at 2:10 PM on January 9


Seconding elmay. I’m a big fan of cheese in/on ANYTHING, but I tried Roy Choi’s recipe and concluded that I’m not a fan of Kraft singles on my ramen.

I am tempted to try those instant cheese ramen packages, though.
posted by theappleonatree at 2:13 PM on January 9


I’m hearing a lot of love for Shin. Has anyone compared it to Nissin Raoh? NR is so awesome I have a hard time believing it can be beaten in the off-the-shelf bracket. Especially the soy flavor!
posted by machinecraig at 2:14 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


My foodie aunt got me some Korean cheese ramen, and indeed I've found it better if you put one Kraft slice on top and let it melt a little. Works with non-cheese instant ramen too. Two slices is too much and overmelted slice just dissolves. Less broth helps.
posted by polymodus at 2:19 PM on January 9


As someone who's from wisconsin, loves curds (fried and fresh), considers chicago pizza pizza, i have to say this intrigues me and i would like to subscribe to this.
posted by symbioid at 2:21 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


If anyone has a line on where you can get made-in-Korea Shin in the US, slide right on into my memail plz. (I have heard but been unable to confirm that Korean-produced Shin is vegetarian but the US-produced stuff has beef extract and thus is forbidden to me. Once upon a time, I swear the ingredients were vegetarian and I developed a taste for it, beef suddenly appeared on the ingredients list, causing great consternation.)
posted by soren_lorensen at 2:29 PM on January 9


So is the cheese powder in the instant cheese ramen basically the powder from Kraft Dinner/Kraft Mac & Cheese?
posted by ITheCosmos at 2:33 PM on January 9


I abhor violence, please stop suggesting people fight over uninteresting food opinions.
posted by doctorfrog at 2:36 PM on January 9 [2 favorites]


> I’m hearing a lot of love for Shin. Has anyone compared it to Nissin Raoh?

They're different kinds of good ramen.

Shin Ramyun is a standard Korean ramen (in the sense that it's representative of a type of ramen); it has a subtle beef base with green onion and garlic and is fairly spicy (Shin Ramyun Black is a lot spicier and has a pretty pronounced beef broth). The Nissin Raoh tonkatsu flavor (there are, iirc, four or five different flavors of Nissin Raoh in the US right now, so this is about the one Costco is selling) has a strong pork flavor with onion and ginger. They're both pretty good. Shin Ramyun is, IMO, more flexible w/r/t what to put in it (I wouldn't put cheese in Nissin Raoh tonkatsu, and adding rice cakes didn't improve it as much as I hoped). Both of them are improved with some fresh green onion and an egg.

> If anyone has a line on where you can get made-in-Korea Shin in the US, slide right on into my memail plz. (I have heard but been unable to confirm that Korean-produced Shin is vegetarian but the US-produced stuff has beef extract and thus is forbidden to me.)

As far as I know, Shin Ramyun has always been made with beef stock; when it was a new product, that was its selling point and rationale for its premium price. Most of the good Korean ramens are made with animal or fish stock. It's possible that the package from the made-in-Korea versions were not labeled clearly. Shin is not made in South Korea any more. It's now only made in the US and I've heard is only available in North America.

With all that aside, Shin Ramyun has an advantage in the socks category.
posted by ardgedee at 2:39 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


Adding chunks of silken tofu to Shin Ramyun also makes it a decent approximation of Korean tofu soup, which I adore and don't get often enough.
posted by tavella at 2:41 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


This doesn’t sound that weird, but then I was a regular at a place in Ishikawa that serves ramen topped with a pile of shredded cheddar and grated Parmesan, as well as other items like ramen with almond paste in the soup, so
posted by DoctorFedora at 2:43 PM on January 9


Adding chunks of silken tofu to Shin Ramyun also makes it a decent approximation of Korean tofu soup, which I adore and don't get often enough.

I do this but prior to adding the water to the pot for the soup, I saute some garlic with a bit of sesame oil. And then the tofu, and some green onions or a bit of sliced bok choi, or some kimchi.

I don't do that very often these days because I've gotten my sodium intake under control, but it's still a welcome treat.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 2:46 PM on January 9 [2 favorites]


Speaking of sodium, I also sometimes spike the Shin Ramyun with a bit of vegetarian oyster sauce for extra salty richness. But the garlic is a big key for me.

Damn, I'm hungry now.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 2:52 PM on January 9


Being on keto, I miss ramen. I have attempted to replicate it with konjac noodles but, no. The suggestion that one might add parmesan and butter to the dish, however, intrigues me greatly.
posted by turbid dahlia at 2:56 PM on January 9


Because I didn't have any Carbo on hand the other night, I grated some good quality pecorino into a Samyang regular spicy (2x is a bit much for me) buldak chicken. It didn't taste like Carbo, but it did taste not unlike like...spaghetti-Os. If spaghetti-Os were fiery little morsels of deliciousness.

You could spend as long as you could possibly want watching ramen reviews on youtube. ProZD does 'em.
posted by praemunire at 2:56 PM on January 9


So is the cheese powder in the instant cheese ramen basically the powder from Kraft Dinner/Kraft Mac & Cheese?

The Korean cheese flavored instant ramen I had came with a packet of thickened cheese sauce plus a packet of powdered processed cheese. So there's a powder for the broth but after that the cheese sauce packet is squeezed on when the noodles are done. The result tastes different than the Kraft cheese slices which I like to use, so I don't know if I prefer the Kraft out of familiarity or if the Kraft processed cheeses just taste a bit better due to manufacturing differences.
posted by polymodus at 2:56 PM on January 9 [2 favorites]


I love the Roy Choi recipe, although my wife and eldest son are horrified whenever I make it.

As a child in the rural Midwest i was introduced to Smack Ramen at the local grocery. I think it’s still around, but haven’t seen it in decades. Maruchan is my go-to nowadays because I can buy a 12-pack of chicken for $2 or splurge for flavors at $0.20/ea.

I got a bowl of Raman at a local place that claimed to do it high-class and it was alright, but I haven’t felt compelled to go back. The noodles underwhelmed, even though the other ingredients were good.
posted by Big Al 8000 at 3:01 PM on January 9


My Korean father-in-law fought in the Korean War and among the few stories he told was the one about he and his squadmates driving at night into the American camp, loading up with whatever food they could easily grab, and returning to their own camp for a feast. American butter was especially prized. It was delicious on rice. It came in big cardboard tubs.

When it was his turn to make the run he grabbed what he could, taking care not to forget the butter, and returned to his camp with the loot. After the rice had been prepped and shared among the squad, they opened the tub of butter, but it seemed "off" somehow. It was orange rather than pale yellow, and much harder than usual. They managed to scoop some out and into their bowls, but it refused to melt. Eventually they just gave up and tossed it aside. Bad butter they agreed. That explained the color. It's a good thing it didn't melt; they might have all gotten sick. Ahn should have checked before he took it. They also agreed never to send my father-in-law on the butter run.

It was cheese, of course, and not bad butter, which my father-in-law realized a few years later when he moved to Los Angeles. He and his squadmates were so close to inventing this way back when. If only they'd had ramen that night instead of rice.
posted by notyou at 3:52 PM on January 9 [12 favorites]


Wait in line forever if you want if that means the line at Zachary’s is shorter.

I'd rather walk up the street to Noodle Theory on the corner with Claremont. There's always a wait though.
posted by w0mbat at 4:05 PM on January 9


I am also obsessed with the Samyang Carbo ramen. But I read it’s a limited edition (in honor of selling 1 billion packages of hot chicken ramen)... Just last week I placed an embarrassingly large order of it to stockpile. Funny to see it mentioned on Metafilter!
posted by sometamegazelle at 4:17 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


HYPOTHESIS: Put cheese on ramen.

MATERIALS: Shin Ramyun, 1 egg (chicken), 1 leaf of kale (broken into small pieces), 100g cheddar cheese (unripened, cut into 1cm-scale chunks), 1 bird's eye pepper (I like it spicy).

METHOD: 1. Cook non-cheese ingredients in the usual way; 2. Pour into bowl; 3. Add some cheese; 4. Eat.

DISCUSSION: As anticipated, the cheese greatly lessened the perceived intensity of the hot spiciness. Previous research indicates that Shin Ramyun is too hot for some people, so adding cheese may be especially desirable in their cases. I will leave the extra chili pepper in longer next time, or maybe use two. I may have over-done it with the cheese, a bit. Had plenty left over to eat on the side as I drained the bowl.

The cheese softens immediately, but not so quickly that you can't get a couple of not fully melted pieces if you're quick enough. They taste good. The fully melted pieces also taste good. The flavour is faintly reminiscent of what in this locale are called nachos, but without any crispy bits for texture it seems considerably more gooey.

CONCLUSION: Add cheese to your instant ramen, if you have some cheese and feel that it's a good idea and think you can eat that much sodium and umami.
posted by sfenders at 4:37 PM on January 9 [3 favorites]


I read the catapult article recently and went ahead and bought Shin Ramyun from the near-ish H-Mart, as well as Kraft singles, and can confirm that the soup was tasty!
I will keep it in reserve for future needs for quick, savory, spicy food.
posted by maryrussell at 5:39 PM on January 9


Shin is not made in South Korea any more. It's now only made in the US and I've heard is only available in North America.

We get it in most supermarkets (mainstream or asian) in Australia.

If anyone has a line on where you can get made-in-Korea Shin in the US, slide right on into my memail plz.

It's not quite the same (it's not spicy, for one thing), but nongshim does a vegan instant ramen that hits similar comforting-and-instant-rameny chords for me. Looks like this.
posted by womb of things to be and tomb of things that were at 6:20 PM on January 9


I'm down with the idea of American cheese in my ramen but I'm confused. Is it supposed to melt entirely and basically dissolve until not recognizable except for adding extra fattiness to the ramen? Because that's what's happened when I've done it, and it's a bit disappointing. I'd rather try something like fresh cheese curds that might survive the boiling water.

I'm just discovering cooking Korean food now and I'm totally in love with the intensity of flavors. My favorite thing so far is Doenjang Jjigae, a hearty stew made from a base of anchovy, chile and the Korean version of miso. So yummy.
posted by Nelson at 7:21 PM on January 9


I'm both amused and sad that cheese seems to be the go-to exotic ingredient in Korean cuisine right now (much like how kimchi is for American restaurants).

The amused is because, being Korean-American, I grew up with it so it's not super novel to me.

The sad part is because the cheese in Korean stuff is fucking delicious but I'm lactose-intolerant now so I have to ask them not to put it in the cheese that makes it so tasty.

I almost would rather be in a library filled with books with broken glasses instead.
posted by anem0ne at 8:55 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


Parmesan cheese, egg, scallions and--amazingly not mentioned yet--bean sprouts.
posted by mark k at 9:04 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


I'm down with the idea of American cheese in my ramen but I'm confused. Is it supposed to melt entirely and basically dissolve until not recognizable except for adding extra fattiness to the ramen?

"It was one of my brother’s ex-girlfriends who first introduced me to the practice of putting a rubbery Kraft Single on my Shin Ramyun. She was, like my brother and me, a multiracial Korean, and had lived in Seoul on and off. Her family always put Kraft Singles on Shin Ramyun, and she showed my brother and me how she did it: She made the noodles, arranged them so they made a slight peak in the middle of the bowl, and then gently placed a Kraft Single on top. She waited a few seconds for the shitty cheese product to start melting, and then began pulling the noodles through it as she ate. Each noodle was coated in Kraft as it passed through, like a car going through a car wash. The noodles became glossier, waxier-looking. It looked awful. It looked intriguing."

From the first link in the FPP.
posted by valkane at 9:19 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


The amused is because, being Korean-American, I grew up with it so it's not super novel to me.

I think the whole point is that Korean-American kids, especially ones that were less well-off, got used to making the dish with the cheese and, now that those kids are old enough to be running their own restaurants (and the restaurant world has gotten much more accepting of "high-low" and multicultural combinations), various forms of the dish with cheese are now proliferating there.
posted by praemunire at 10:01 PM on January 9 [1 favorite]


Maybe he can compare the Red Delcious apples of his childhood lunch bag to the fresh squeezed orange juice from Berkeley Bowl next?

Oh, give me a break. The Ramen Shop, like any other business of its ilk in this town, justifies most of its price premium on the basis of offering both a gourmetified version of a comfort food from another culture and the ability to get it without having to interact with anyone who's too far outside of the narrow cultural boundary of your Lululemon-wearing-ass, police-calling white Rockridge neighbors.
posted by invitapriore at 11:08 PM on January 9 [2 favorites]


I would and have waited in line for ramen. But it’s usually the Japanese kind that has been made with pork broth over many many hours. London has exploded with ramen places and I’m super happy about it. Our current facorite is Bonedaddies in SoHo. It’s japanese but their Kimchi seafood ramen is delicious and the spice even passes muster with my dad when he happily mopped up his forehead and blew his nose at the end of finishing a bowl of it.

I wouldn’t wait in line for Korean instant ramen, but you can get it at my local Korean dive for about £8. I can get Korean ramen packets like Shin in the U.K. I also really like Neogori, which is like Shin but seafood instead of beef and thicker noodles. An egg is mandatory for me, either whisked in at the end or softly poached in the broth. We don’t get Kraft cheese but I’m not sure about using cheddar. I’ll need to experiment and report back as sfenders has done.
posted by like_neon at 2:52 AM on January 10


pulling the noodles through it as she ate

Yeah I read that but it confused me. I've tried that, and while the first couple of bites then have big identifiable cheese globs on it by the fourth bite most of it has fallen into the soup and dissolved. Maybe the trick is to wait a few minutes for the soup to cool before eating. That both gives the noodles time to finish rehydrating and gives the cheese a chance of surviving intact.
posted by Nelson at 5:00 AM on January 10


The Ramen Shop, like any other business of its ilk in this town, justifies most of its price premium on the basis of offering both a gourmetified version of a comfort food from another culture and the ability to get it without having to interact with anyone who's too far outside of the narrow cultural boundary of your Lululemon-wearing-ass, police-calling white Rockridge neighbors.

Have you ever looked at a high-end ramen recipe? You can check out David Chang's recipe in the Momofuku cookbook. It's actually pretty involved and time-consuming. Yes, there are many ways to economize on that recipe, right down to making it instant instead of cooking it for ten or more hours. These methods produce results that many people, including me, also find tasty. But, yes, a good long-simmered ramen with high-quality ingredients has a far more complex and varied flavor. (You may or may not consider it worth it--but also consider that a common lament of chefs of color is that Americans refuse to pay a premium on "ethnic" cuisines, considering them inherently "cheap." It looks like the Ramen Shop's owners are white, but if your complaint is that ramen just shouldn't cost a lot, rather than that white people shouldn't be exclusively capturing a potential price premium in this country, you're reinforcing that attitude.)
posted by praemunire at 9:14 AM on January 10 [1 favorite]


Sharing this right now with my brother who lives in Korea and would only eat mac and cheese as a kid. I do know that one of his biggest complaints has been the price of cheese in Korea, and each time we visit him, we bring him bricks of cheddar and Colby.

As for ramen, there are unfortunately few opportunities to get vegetarian versions of it, and the best — to my tastes — has been Indo-Mie, who discontinued their (weirdly vegetarian) satay variety.
posted by klangklangston at 10:04 AM on January 10


The Kojo Namdi show just had an episode about the "cheap eats" perception of ethnic food and trying to get people to pay more for things like ramen, Filipino cuisine or soul food. It's definitely a racist thing, although "white people bringing expensive ethnic food to the white upper class" isn't much better.

Pork ramen prepared by Ippudo is on my top 10 best foods I've eaten in my life. We also often pay "expensive" prices for fried chicken at Bon Chon too.

Also, for people with an H Mart near you, there is a dip called Ssamjang which I am now addicted to. I put it straight on salads, but I bet it would be good with the korean cheese ramen too.
posted by Hermeowne Grangepurr at 10:45 AM on January 10 [1 favorite]


If you don't live near an H Mart, Maangchi has a recipe for ssamjang.

I love ramyun but, sadly, can't eat most of it due to having developed a potato intolerance some years ago, and most Korean brands include potato starch in their noodles. (I've learned it's necessary to closely read the ingredients list in every roman-alphabet language on the package. When I noticed that the "modified starch" listed in the English ingredients on one package appeared as "fécule de pomme de terre modifiée" in French, I realized why my digestion had been so unhappy recently.)

Instead, my husband and I have started buying dry noodles in bulk and coming up with our own broth. A little dashi (because c'mon, this is supposed to be quick and easy, I'm not gonna do the whole dried-anchovies-and-seaweed broth thing for this) and some gochujang makes an excellent starting point. Then add whatever else sounds good – aromatics like garlic, shallots, and lemongrass, vegetables, sliced rice cakes, etc. Maybe enrich the broth at the end by whisking in a tempered egg. Top with scallions, cilantro, shredded seaweed, whatever's on hand. It's not quite as easy as instant but still very good.
posted by Lexica at 11:17 AM on January 10


It looks like the Ramen Shop's owners are white, but if your complaint is that ramen just shouldn't cost a lot, rather than that white people shouldn't be exclusively capturing a potential price premium in this country, you're reinforcing that attitude.

My complaint very much isn’t that ramen shouldn’t cost a lot, but that there’s a tendency for white restaurant proprietors to impose a (very much culturally-situated) notion of “gourmet” on comfort foods from non-white cultures and charge a premium on the basis of that translation, which is exactly what you articulate in this quote, and is exactly what I think The Ramen Shop is doing. So I think we’re furiously agreeing?
posted by invitapriore at 6:26 PM on January 15


Sooo...it's a cold day out, so I decided that today would be the day to try Shin Ramyun with a Kraft single and an egg for lunch.

It's absolutely delicious. This will definitely be a rare treat, but A+, would eat again.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 10:25 AM on January 21 [1 favorite]


I think the whole point is that Korean-American kids, especially ones that were less well-off, got used to making the dish with the cheese and, now that those kids are old enough to be running their own restaurants (and the restaurant world has gotten much more accepting of "high-low" and multicultural combinations), various forms of the dish with cheese are now proliferating there.

i mean, we weren't well off, and i did not get used to making any korean dishes with cheese, so...

i quite get why it's a thing. it's something that's tasty, melds well, and is relatively novel. you can also see how it's been discussed many times in the past, for example, in this article, which was also a mefi front page...
posted by anem0ne at 12:16 PM on January 21


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