All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.
July 24, 2019 10:52 AM   Subscribe

 
Fiery the angels fell.

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posted by Cash4Lead at 10:53 AM on July 24, 2019 [8 favorites]


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posted by biffa at 10:54 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by rhamphorhynchus at 10:56 AM on July 24, 2019


IIRC, Rutger Hauer wrote his monologue in Blade Runner himself, on the day of the shoot. He showed it to Ridley Scott, who gave it a thumbs-up.

Moments like these create enduring works of art.
posted by adamrice at 10:58 AM on July 24, 2019 [43 favorites]


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posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 10:58 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Abehammerb Lincoln at 10:58 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Pendragon at 10:59 AM on July 24, 2019


I know I’m not the only one who developed an unshakable crush on him thanks to Ladyhawke.

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posted by rewil at 11:00 AM on July 24, 2019 [21 favorites]


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posted by mikelieman at 11:01 AM on July 24, 2019


IIRC, Rutger Hauer wrote his monologue in Blade Runner himself, on the day of the shoot. He showed it to Ridley Scott, who gave it a thumbs-up.

Almost: In his autobiography, Hauer said he merely cut the original scripted speech by several lines, adding only, "All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain".
posted by Pendragon at 11:01 AM on July 24, 2019 [22 favorites]


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posted by runehog at 11:02 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by hanov3r at 11:03 AM on July 24, 2019


The last movie I saw with him was Hobo with a Shotgun and it was everything you could ask for from a movie called Hobo with a Shotgun.

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posted by ChuraChura at 11:04 AM on July 24, 2019 [30 favorites]


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posted by surlyben at 11:05 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Iridic at 11:05 AM on July 24, 2019


In his autobiography, Hauer said he merely cut the original scripted speech by several lines, adding only, "All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain".

That "only" is doing a hell of a lot of work in that sentence.

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posted by Atom Eyes at 11:07 AM on July 24, 2019 [48 favorites]


Possibly the best dying monologue in modern American cinema and it's just one moment in what was a remarkable career and life

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posted by HunterFelt at 11:09 AM on July 24, 2019 [10 favorites]


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posted by camyram at 11:11 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by zombieflanders at 11:11 AM on July 24, 2019


hilariously trivial but i rather liked him as the magical fairy godfather in true blood.
posted by poffin boffin at 11:12 AM on July 24, 2019 [13 favorites]


Shooting script: "I’ve seen things… seen things you little people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion bright as magnesium… I rode on the back decks of a blinker and watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments… they’ll be gone."

Movie: "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die."

In the pantheon of the greatest monologues in cinema history, and just 42 words.

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posted by Etrigan at 11:13 AM on July 24, 2019 [48 favorites]


The last thing I saw him in was the Butcher’s Block season of Channel Zero. He played the patriarch of a cannibal family that lived on a plantation in another dimension. It was willfully bizarre material but he played it with as much gusto and feeling as if he were performing Shakespeare.
posted by ejs at 11:14 AM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]


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posted by acb at 11:16 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by me3dia at 11:16 AM on July 24, 2019


🕊️
posted by radwolf76 at 11:16 AM on July 24, 2019 [17 favorites]


Looks like I'll need to break out Mr. Stitch for a memorial rewatch this weekend.

RIP.
posted by davelog at 11:17 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


If you haven't seen it yet, make sure you see Blood of Hereoes, featuring some of Hauer's best cinematic ass-kicking and gratuitous 80s sci fi B movie ultra-violence. The movie itself also doesn't suck and is kind of a sleeper and classic of the era that fits in with Mad Max and similar post apocalyptic SF movies.

He should have been Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen in Lynch's Dune instead of Sting. Or even Gurney Halleck.
posted by loquacious at 11:19 AM on July 24, 2019 [13 favorites]


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posted by Splunge at 11:20 AM on July 24, 2019


Roy Batty's death speech implies that interstellar travel has been achieved by humans, but from the few times I watched the film, I'm not remembering any other references to that being an actual thing. Did either the movie or the book have more explicit references to interstellar space travel?
posted by Atom Eyes at 11:23 AM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


He cameoed in Galavant as King Richard's (much) older brother, Kingsley. You knew that when Rutger Hauer's glower power showed up, shit was about to get serious.

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posted by Faint of Butt at 11:24 AM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


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posted by dlugoczaj at 11:24 AM on July 24, 2019


For me, he will always be Etienne Navarre from Ladyhawke, which is unwatchable now because of its horrible soundtrack, but was a seminal fanatsy movie for young ikahime.


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posted by ikahime at 11:25 AM on July 24, 2019 [5 favorites]


That final scenne of his in Bladerunner is indelible, and to a large extent moves the film into something more, a mediation of what it means to be human, and I can't think of another actor from that time who could have made that scene work so well.

RIP, Rutger

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posted by Phlegmco(tm) at 11:25 AM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]


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posted by Unioncat at 11:25 AM on July 24, 2019


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I am so glad I called out from work today. About to binge all the Rutger Hauer. Blade Runner is my favorite movie and I really had a soft spot for him in general.
posted by primalux at 11:27 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


Ladyhawke, which is unwatchable now because of its horrible soundtrack

You take that back.
posted by Faint of Butt at 11:27 AM on July 24, 2019 [25 favorites]


Someone on twitter noticed that Roy Batty died in 2019.

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posted by BlueBlueElectricBlue at 11:27 AM on July 24, 2019 [24 favorites]


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posted by snsranch at 11:29 AM on July 24, 2019


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Even though he's indirectly responsible for a phase I went through where I bought a leather trenchcoat and bleached the hell out of my hair.
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 11:31 AM on July 24, 2019 [8 favorites]


hey heaven... juggers comin'

(seriously....see Blood of Heroes)
posted by kokaku at 11:31 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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posted by treepour at 11:33 AM on July 24, 2019


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Terrifying in the original Hitcher
posted by MarvinTheCat at 11:35 AM on July 24, 2019 [19 favorites]


. and on preview, seconding the above in the original "Hitcher".
posted by coppertop at 11:36 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


A Renaissance man in the truest sense.

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posted by They sucked his brains out! at 11:38 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


This hits hard.

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posted by SonInLawOfSam at 11:41 AM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Roy Batty's death speech implies that interstellar travel has been achieved by humans, but from the few times I watched the film, I'm not remembering any other references to that being an actual thing. Did either the movie or the book have more explicit references to interstellar space travel?

This is hinted at in Bladerunner and in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep that the movie is roughly based on originally.

The part that is missing (overtly) from Bladerunner that is directly addressed in the book is the implication that everyone left on Earth is ineligible to migrate to the "off world colonies" due to being genetically inferior or diseased or so on.

It is implied in both the movie and the books that the people who live in the "off world colonies" have android slaves and do not live on a ruined Earth.

And if I'm recalling the book correctly, it is implied that "Mercerism" - the empathic religion that gives rise to people coveting even synthetic wildlife as status symbols, also seen in the movie with synthetic animals - works across interstellar distances or is implied to, w/r/t it also being a religious-technologic synthetic fraud itself.

In both the book and the movie I have always interpreted this omission as intentional because it is unavailable and equally mysterious to any of the people in the story, perhaps even including Tyrell himself. The "off world colonies" are simply elsewhere - if functionally mythical - to the people left on Earth. It is a mystery to them as well.
posted by loquacious at 11:42 AM on July 24, 2019 [14 favorites]


If you haven’t told the world “I want more life, fucker” recently, today is an especially appropriate time to do so.
posted by Parasite Unseen at 11:46 AM on July 24, 2019 [34 favorites]


home again, home again...
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posted by j_curiouser at 11:46 AM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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posted by Rustic Etruscan at 11:49 AM on July 24, 2019


“I want more life, fucker”

Another great line, as Hauer intentionally pronounced it so that it also sounds like, "I want more life, Father."
posted by Saxon Kane at 11:49 AM on July 24, 2019 [8 favorites]


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posted by condour75 at 11:59 AM on July 24, 2019


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posted by XMLicious at 12:02 PM on July 24, 2019


Me too, ejs. Hauer took that Channel Zero much higher.

Batty: I've done... questionable things.

Tyrell: Also extraordinary things; revel in your time.

Batty: Nothing the God of biomechanics wouldn't let you into heaven for.

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posted by doctornemo at 12:03 PM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]



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posted by helion at 12:12 PM on July 24, 2019


Did either the movie or the book have more explicit references to interstellar space travel?

Technically the terrible Kurt Russell movie Soldier is set in the Blade Runner universe and takes place on a non-solar system planet.
posted by PenDevil at 12:13 PM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


Well, this was sad news.
posted by y2karl at 12:16 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


There my have been better actors, but I can't think of many who obviously enjoyed it more.
posted by DrAstroZoom at 12:20 PM on July 24, 2019 [6 favorites]


My mom saw him perform with Noorder Compagnie in the 60s in Leeuwarden when she was a teen. She still mentions that to this day, how handsome he was and his charisma. I think she had a bit of a crush to be honest.

Anyhow, he was probably the greatest Dutch actor and Dutch media are ofcourse falling over themselves to remember and celebrate him.

I'll leave this here..
posted by mirthe at 12:20 PM on July 24, 2019 [10 favorites]


I think above mentions are missing the fact he was disturbingly attractive in the original Hitcher. I think preteen me wrote fanfic. Ladyhawke, of course, and that stupid scarf in Nighthawks...

Oh! Blind Fury, in which he so perfectly got what made Zatoichi movies great.

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posted by I claim sanctuary at 12:25 PM on July 24, 2019 [6 favorites]


I was heartbroken upon hearing the news of his passing; he was one of my movie heartthrobs in my early years. He caught my eye as Landskenecht mercenary Martin in Paul Verhoeven's "Flesh & Blood", as the handsome and swashbuckling Etienne de Navarre in "Ladyhawke", and of course, as replicant Roy Batty in "Blade Runner"...

His legacy shall not be forgotten. Rest In Peace Forevermore.
posted by Jade Dragon at 12:26 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Going through some of the linked articles, seems like the HIV/AIDS charity he founded had been working from the early 2000's through this year, with a focus on "raising help and awareness on the HIV/AIDS situation, focusing especially on support to children and pregnant women."

His acting was great, but what he did outside of that was just as powerful.

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posted by inflatablekiwi at 12:30 PM on July 24, 2019 [8 favorites]


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posted by Foosnark at 12:31 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Two unicycles and some duct tape at 12:31 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Halloween Jack at 12:33 PM on July 24, 2019


......

One for each Nexus model.
posted by extraheavymarcellus at 12:36 PM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


What, no Soldaat van Oranje fans?! Come on, Metafilter!
posted by dobbs at 12:39 PM on July 24, 2019 [5 favorites]


What, no Soldaat van Oranje fans?! Come on, Metafilter!

SCHEVENINGEN!!!!
posted by Pendragon at 12:41 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Floris - Het gestolen kasteel (1969)
posted by pracowity at 12:45 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep that the movie is roughly based on originally
The book mentions that a spaceship had been sent to Proxima but turned back. However Earth beams transmissions to Proxima just in case humans got there. It doesn't make much sense but PKD wasn't never very interested in this sort of "detail". The movie mentions "off-world" colonies but that's all. To be fair, the interstellar stuff in that end scene came a little out of nowhere since it meant that humans would have developed near-c or FTL travel at some time before 2019 and somehow managed to wage space battles. I think that this dialogue is actually corny and was primarily created to sound cool and sci-fi-sounding. But the way Rutger Hauer delivers the speech, his little smile at the end, that's absolute, star-making cinematic perfection.
It's too bad he and Paul Verhoeven had a falling out after Flesh+Blood: his career was much too discreet in the past 30 years and his talent underused. He never stopped working but he really rarely got the roles he deserved after 1988. Another Hauer movie worth checking is The Legend of the Holy Drinker (1988), which won the Golden Lion in Venice. The Mill and the Cross (2011), where he plays Pieter Bruegel, looks absolutely beautiful.
posted by elgilito at 12:50 PM on July 24, 2019 [7 favorites]


In a slightly better timeline, as a young man he played Lestat.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 12:50 PM on July 24, 2019 [10 favorites]


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posted by Token Meme at 12:58 PM on July 24, 2019


Rutger Hauer and Darryl Hannah combined were by far the most memorable part of that movie to me as a kid. Though more than Roy's death scene even it was his confrontation with Tyrell, in the version only fairly recently reintegrated with the director's cut in which it lingers on the eye gouging and there is blood.
posted by atoxyl at 1:01 PM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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posted by supercoiled at 1:06 PM on July 24, 2019


Man made The Hitcher, which was all that it should be.
Comes back and makes Hobo With A Shotgun which is, again. all that it should be.
(Leave alone his Unhidden King of Genre Movies title)

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posted by djrock3k at 1:11 PM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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posted by detachd at 1:14 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by porpoise at 1:16 PM on July 24, 2019


I always loved his portrayal of the amoral terrorist in Stallone's Nighthawks.
posted by I_Love_Bananas at 1:21 PM on July 24, 2019 [5 favorites]


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posted by eclectist at 1:23 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by ZeusHumms at 1:24 PM on July 24, 2019


If we’re being honest, he rarely was in a movie that deserved him but man oh man, did so many B movies become better by him being there.

As much as I love the original Shintaro Katsu run on Zatoichi, I wish that Hauer had made a whole slew of Blind Fury movies.
posted by Eikonaut at 1:29 PM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


Terrifying in the original Hitcher

How good what Hauer? I saw Hitcher in the movie theater and on the drive home we were tailed by a road rager in a pickup truck who rode our bumper all around our neighborhood (we were not going to let him know where we lived) until we pulled into a Tim Horton's that was pretty much a cop shop.

I had a pretty conscious aversion to Hauer for decades.

That's good acting.
posted by srboisvert at 1:31 PM on July 24, 2019 [8 favorites]


What, no Soldaat van Oranje fans?! Come on, Metafilter!

Also Turkish Delight, Spetters, Flesh and Blood. I would have liked to see him and Paul Verhoeven work on some big sci-fi action film together.
posted by cazoo at 1:39 PM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


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posted by leslies at 1:39 PM on July 24, 2019


Wow, he unambiguously nailed why Blade Runner 2049 didn't work for me in a way that I have never been able to articulate. I always had the sense that he possessed an incisive artistic eye, which is unfortunately rare among actors at that level. RIP.
posted by invitapriore at 1:50 PM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]


whoa fuck I need a minute to process this.
posted by nikaspark at 1:51 PM on July 24, 2019 [5 favorites]


Man, I grew up in the 80s and his scary characters really seared into my mind. What a unique talent.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:01 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Blade Runner is still my favorite movie of all time.

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posted by biscotti at 2:13 PM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]


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posted by Archer25 at 2:21 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by The Vice Admiral of the Narrow Seas at 3:11 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by mfoight at 3:21 PM on July 24, 2019


Blade Runner was on the list of movies we studied in depth around architecture in cinema. But what I remember most about the repeat viewings was how powerfully he told me what was important about being human.

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posted by meinvt at 3:38 PM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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(of course)
posted by Roy Batty at 3:42 PM on July 24, 2019 [22 favorites]


"The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long, and you have burned so very very brightly Roy."
posted by clavdivs at 4:45 PM on July 24, 2019 [7 favorites]


years ago, I did some day work on one of his movies. I can't remember what it was though the timing and the location tells me it was probably Arctic Blue (ie: accolade free, straight to VHS or DVD). Anyway, I got to talking to one of the permanent crew and the topic of the leading man inevitably came up.

"So what's he like?"
"Rutger? Oh man, he's one of the good ones. Total respect."


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posted by philip-random at 5:30 PM on July 24, 2019 [4 favorites]


Let's not forget Split Second, a 1992 sci-fi film that benefits from Hauer's loopy portrayal of a burnt-out cop addicted to coffee, cigarettes, and chocolate.

(Admittedly, that movie's most famous scene has Hauer in a supporting role, but I think it conveys the spirit of the film quite well.)
posted by stannate at 5:51 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


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posted by dogstoevski at 6:07 PM on July 24, 2019


Damn, another good man gone. I'd rather lost track of his later stuff, but some of his eighties stuff (not just Bladerunner) was a big part of my life. The last thing I saw him in was the rather excellent first five minutes or so of Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets - the rest of the film is terrible.

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posted by Fuchsoid at 6:19 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Oh, and I nearly forgot - here in Britain he did the voiceover for a memorable series of ads for Lurpak butter.
posted by Fuchsoid at 6:36 PM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


Oh, my. To me, his most memorable film was Blade Runner. But Ladyhawke is a close second, and the soundtrack is delightful, if somewhat contrary to the visuals (and at the same time, wholly appropriate for Matthew Broderick's character).

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posted by lhauser at 6:42 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


I host an online WP every tuesday night titled Guilty Pleasures. In honor of Hauer, I decided to do Hobo, Blade Runner, and Split Second. But that wasn't enough so he is getting a second night with Ladyhawke, Fatherland, and Soldiers of Orange.


Strangely not but two hours before news hit of his death I was watching him in Blade Runner. Nothing I can write here will do credit to by how much I appreciate his work. Unlike him, I just don't have the words.
posted by miss-lapin at 7:18 PM on July 24, 2019 [3 favorites]


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posted by Ignorantsavage at 9:06 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by Pouteria at 9:11 PM on July 24, 2019


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I am much, much sadder about this than I would have imagined.
posted by tzikeh at 9:19 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


Etienne de Navarre has to be in my top five badasses of all time. LOVE the movie. The plot still holds together even if you might complain about the soundtrack (I don't).
posted by Ber at 9:27 PM on July 24, 2019 [2 favorites]


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posted by genehack at 9:34 PM on July 24, 2019


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posted by gt2 at 11:17 PM on July 24, 2019


The last thing I saw him in was the rather excellent first five minutes or so of Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets - the rest of the film is terrible.

He was in the what in the fuck now!? I missed this.
posted by loquacious at 11:48 PM on July 24, 2019 [1 favorite]


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posted by drnick at 12:22 AM on July 25, 2019


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posted by Gelatin at 3:10 AM on July 25, 2019


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posted by filtergik at 3:21 AM on July 25, 2019


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posted by valkane at 6:01 AM on July 25, 2019


Worth noting that Hauer estimated that about one-third of his work was with first-time directors. He really loved just showing up and acting, and took pleasure in helping noobs earn their wings.
posted by mightygodking at 6:20 AM on July 25, 2019 [7 favorites]


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posted by peakes at 6:35 AM on July 25, 2019


Late to the wake, but here's the documentary "Blond, blue eyes" by director Simone de Vries.
(disclamer under new rules: director is a friend)
posted by ouke at 7:06 AM on July 25, 2019 [1 favorite]


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Slowly more and more alone on this planet.
Me: "Oh no! Rutger Hauer died."
Wife: "Who?"
Not her fault, she wasn't there.
posted by Meatbomb at 7:17 AM on July 25, 2019 [2 favorites]


He let us know him, and it was wonderful he did so. He was no poor actor strutting and fretting, and we will always hear his words.
posted by Oyéah at 8:17 AM on July 25, 2019 [2 favorites]


He appeared with Joan Chen in a few things, including the weird-ass Blood of Heroes (I'm still pissed that when I met Delroy Lindo nobody knew who the fuck I was talking about). But I can't find a streaming version of Deadlock/Wedlock and that saddens me. Did Mimi Rogers sue or something? All I'm seeing is VHS copies on ebay.
posted by aspersioncast at 5:00 PM on July 25, 2019


The Ballad of Roy Batty, by Grumbling Fur
posted by ohkay at 4:22 PM on July 26, 2019


......

One for each Nexus model.
There is no way to say that without opening the “was Decker a replicant” can of worms.

I never saw him in any other movies—I’m not a movie guy—but that dying scene in Blade Runner was powerful and will be remembered for a long time. The best speeches are usually the shortest (at least for me).
posted by Gilgamesh's Chauffeur at 7:26 PM on July 27, 2019


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posted by cass at 1:56 PM on July 30, 2019


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