schnappi
December 27, 2006 9:51 PM   Subscribe

 
not technically a double
posted by vronsky at 9:53 PM on December 27, 2006


I have no idea what this is.

The next viral video?

History/back story, anyone?
posted by niles at 10:03 PM on December 27, 2006


Aha!
posted by niles at 10:06 PM on December 27, 2006




For some bizarre reason, that song was quite successful in Australia for a while.
posted by kisch mokusch at 10:12 PM on December 27, 2006


Oh Schnappi. Ich habe so so sehr versucht, dich zu vergessen.

I would disagree and say, "Doch! It is a double."

I hate this fucking song.
posted by chillmost at 10:33 PM on December 27, 2006


This....this is the greatest thing I've ever seen. I'm pretty sure this is actually what's on the tape in Infinite Jest.
posted by 235w103 at 10:33 PM on December 27, 2006 [1 favorite]


Italo Schnappi ! - thanks niles
posted by vronsky at 10:34 PM on December 27, 2006


I wish English had a single word equivalent for doch. It's a good word.
posted by kisch mokusch at 10:36 PM on December 27, 2006 [1 favorite]


"I hate this fucking song" - chill chillmost, your kid may like it.
posted by vronsky at 10:43 PM on December 27, 2006


"I wish English had a single word equivalent for doch."
posted by kisch mokusch at 4:36 PM AEST on December 28

Indeed.
posted by Effigy2000 at 10:56 PM on December 27, 2006


Let's hope there is a not a Dora Mashup
posted by Hands of Manos at 10:57 PM on December 27, 2006


Effigy2000, "doch" doesn't mean "indeed". It means "On the contrary".
posted by Steven C. Den Beste at 11:00 PM on December 27, 2006


Steve, I know. My "indeed" was meant to convey a similar longing as that which kisch mokusch had expressed.
posted by Effigy2000 at 11:03 PM on December 27, 2006


doch == alas?
posted by niles at 11:09 PM on December 27, 2006


"doch" in German doesn't mean alas... as suggested, "on the contrary" is a much better translation, like "si" in French.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 11:39 PM on December 27, 2006


My mother-in-law gets a little schnappi around the holidays. We're trying to keep her down to one bottle for Xmas and one for New Years.
posted by Pollomacho at 11:44 PM on December 27, 2006 [1 favorite]


"Gegenschein" is another cool german word.
posted by vronsky at 11:54 PM on December 27, 2006


Walk like an Egyptian... krokodil.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 11:58 PM on December 27, 2006


"I hate this fucking song" - chill chillmost, your kid may like it.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. I would still love my kid. If I had one.
posted by chillmost at 12:32 AM on December 28, 2006


Never has a thread been more confusing than this if one fails to bother clicking the link.
posted by item at 1:41 AM on December 28, 2006


My favorite German word is "Backpfeifengesicht" - a face that cries out for a fist in it. What a treasure, the German language.
posted by chillmost at 1:51 AM on December 28, 2006


The little girl, Joy Gruttmann, who sings the song.
posted by nickyskye at 3:59 AM on December 28, 2006


Needs a Schnappi vs. Kenya remix.
posted by b1tr0t at 4:24 AM on December 28, 2006


ive heard the french "si" translated as "if" or "so", but never "on the contrary".
posted by phaedon at 5:18 AM on December 28, 2006


'Gegenschein' is an English word. It is English for 'gegenschein'. Though my dictionary gives 'counterglow' as a (feeble) synonym.
posted by hexatron at 5:59 AM on December 28, 2006


phaedon, that's a different word. The si that's being mentioned here is used for 'yes' when you're contradicting what someone else's negative:
"Je ne l'ai pas."
"Si, tu l'as!"

I don't see why the lack of a specialized word for that is any kind of problem; in English it would be:
"I don't have it."
"Yes you do!"

Which is just as good. But doch is a nice word.
posted by languagehat at 6:14 AM on December 28, 2006


Er, delete "what" after "contradicting."
posted by languagehat at 6:15 AM on December 28, 2006


I thought the "si" became particularly useful in answering negative questions in French, so instead of going "You aren't there yet are you?" "No" "No, you aren't there yet, or no, you are there already?" "Yes, I'm not there yet," you can just say si and it gets the point across perfectly.
posted by that girl at 6:58 AM on December 28, 2006


dochbag?
posted by matteo at 7:18 AM on December 28, 2006


Palate cleansing
posted by Burhanistan at 7:20 AM on December 28, 2006


Ein lama in yokohama on the Schnappi album.
Jing Jingeling, Schnappi at Christmas.
posted by nickyskye at 7:27 AM on December 28, 2006


finally i found something to quench my thirst for more schnappi
posted by phaedon at 7:34 AM on December 28, 2006


reeeemiiiixxx
posted by phaedon at 7:36 AM on December 28, 2006 [1 favorite]


reeeemiiiixxx
posted by phaedon


Yeesh. That schnappi was clearly and patiently calculated.
posted by Burhanistan at 7:47 AM on December 28, 2006


Totally a double, and totally passé, so let me jump on the semantics thing:

On doch: while it does convey that the current statement is (somewhat) opposite in meaning to the preceding one, I would still not translate it as "on the contrary" - on the contrary. (Couldn't resist.)

One sense of "on the contrary" is often used to *refute* a preceding statement, and to introduce an illustration of why the speaker thinks it should be refuted. Example:

a) Bunnies are cuddly-wuddly!
b) On the contrary. Bunnies have fangs and are actually quite dangerous.


Doch, I would think, does not refute a preceding statement so much, but rather introduces a statement of opposite meaning taking into account the preceding one. Example:

a) Bunnies are cuddly-wuddly!
b) But still, I wouldn't get anywhere near them, if I were you.


So I would translate doch as "but still", "still", "but", "nevertheless", "nonetheless" or "however" depending on intended meaning. Note that there is another sense of "on the contrary" that does have a similar meaning (i.e. not refuting wat has been stated before, just introducing a new viewpoint), but I'd want to avoid ambiguity whenever possible.

Also, on si:

I thought the "si" became particularly useful in answering negative questions in French, so instead of going "You aren't there yet are you?" "No" "No, you aren't there yet, or no, you are there already?" "Yes, I'm not there yet," you can just say si and it gets the point across perfectly.

My French is a little rusty, but wouldn't si in response to this question convey the meaning "Yes, I am there already"?
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 8:09 AM on December 28, 2006


My French is a little rusty, but wouldn't si in response to this question convey the meaning "Yes, I am there already"?

Yes. In that girl's example, "Oui" would give the meaning she indicates (agreeing with the previous speaker's negative).
posted by languagehat at 8:11 AM on December 28, 2006


doch can't be simply classified as just "on the contrary", or "still", although it can be both of these things, since the word is often used as an emphasis also and, depending on context, can have a variety of meanings (leo puts it into perspective a little).

(oh no, it's morning in America, this thread will be dead soon)
posted by kisch mokusch at 8:46 AM on December 28, 2006


doch schmoch, I haven't had enough of Northern European viral videos, ah loituma!.
posted by nickyskye at 9:30 AM on December 28, 2006


kisch mokusch: exactly right. Compare Dutch toch.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 10:59 AM on December 28, 2006


Ah yes, I managed to mix myself up. Such tragedy.
posted by that girl at 11:58 AM on December 28, 2006


"Totally a double, and totally passé" - bah humbug to you too. Not a double and not passe unless you are a hipster douche.
posted by vronsky at 3:39 PM on December 28, 2006


Dude. It's a year old and has been discussed here before. I was being ironic though, referring to the fact that the thread had turned into a discussion of a German word. :) No offence meant. Fun post.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 4:15 PM on December 28, 2006


Yeah, sorry for the derail (I just assumed it would be deleted, but what would I know, I'm a n00b). I like toch, by the way. Have heard "doch doch" being used in German as well.
posted by kisch mokusch at 5:15 PM on December 28, 2006


"No offence meant" - cool, peace.


"Yeah, sorry for the derail" - nah, I love derails and German etymology. Seriously.


"kisch mokusch" - is that an onomatopoeia?


And holy crap phaedon, he had that dude in a death roll!
posted by vronsky at 7:43 PM on December 28, 2006


"kisch mokusch" - is that an onomatopoeia?

Nah, I'm not that clever. Just a nickname, given to me by a German girlfriend, and since I set up an ICQ account with this name, I thought I'd keep the "web persona" consistent. She said it was a Hungarian term, but I think she gave it German spelling, since I can't find it on Google. I can't even remember what it means any more, so if anybody out there knows Hungarian, I'd be interested to know what the correct words/meanings are.
posted by kisch mokusch at 8:16 PM on December 28, 2006


In Hungarian it's spelled kis mókus, and it means 'little squirrel.'
posted by languagehat at 6:13 AM on December 29, 2006


That's right! I remember now! Köszönöm languagehat :-)
posted by kisch mokusch at 9:14 PM on December 29, 2006


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