Merry Fitzmas
March 6, 2007 9:17 AM   Subscribe

Scooter Libby guilty on four out of five counts. Not guilty on one charge of making false statements. Libby faces up to 30 years in prison and over $1 million in fines. TalkLeft's Jeralyn Merritt liveblogs.
posted by XQUZYPHYR (143 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
I've been sitting here for 4 minutes, waiting for it.
posted by taosbat at 9:19 AM on March 6, 2007


Will the jailbird sing?
posted by ericb at 9:20 AM on March 6, 2007


Seeya, Scooter!
posted by EarBucket at 9:20 AM on March 6, 2007


It's not the sex leak, it's the obstruction of justice!
posted by eriko at 9:21 AM on March 6, 2007


Now let's see if Cheney resigns. You know, for "health reasons." We can dream, at least.
posted by azpenguin at 9:23 AM on March 6, 2007


So it's Libby Libby Libby
Who was lying lying lying
About the lady lady lady
Who was spying spying spying
posted by fandango_matt at 9:23 AM on March 6, 2007 [16 favorites]


Please flip... please flip...
posted by mkultra at 9:24 AM on March 6, 2007


Heh, I commented in the other topic about this, but:

When I first saw this picture, I swore he was being followed out by Darth Vader.
posted by Dr-Baa at 9:24 AM on March 6, 2007 [7 favorites]


The second link is a little week, but I appreciate the sentiment of the post and also that your post beat the other by seconds.
posted by Joey Michaels at 9:24 AM on March 6, 2007


It is a little "weak" of course, but I'm here all week.
posted by Joey Michaels at 9:24 AM on March 6, 2007


Dr-Baa, it wasn't just you.
posted by Faint of Butt at 9:25 AM on March 6, 2007


“What became unmistakably clear, though, was [Special Prosecutor Patrick] Fitzgerald’s fundamental theory of the case. As much as the prosecutor talked about Libby’s alleged lies, it was obvious that Fitzgerald, on Tuesday as well as throughout the investigation, believed his chief target was — and perhaps still is — Dick Cheney.

‘What was all the hullabaloo about?’ Fitzgerald asked as he discussed the reaction in the vice president’s office to Wilson’s attacks, which had begun after the CIA sent him on a fact-finding trip to Niger. ‘The question of who sent Wilson was hugely important, and they wanted everybody to know it wasn’t the vice president.’

That was undoubtedly true; testimony at the trial established, and the prosecution conceded, that the vice president’s office did not, in fact, send Joseph Wilson to Africa. And since that was the case, it was also true that Cheney, and Libby, wanted everyone to know that the vice president’s office had not sent Wilson to Africa. Some observers might ask, ‘What’s wrong with that?’ But the undertone of Fitzgerald’s argument, and, in retrospect, of his entire investigation, was that a simple effort at political pushback — the bid to discredit Wilson — was somehow a criminal act.”*
posted by ericb at 9:25 AM on March 6, 2007


Swore I read this somewhere else.
posted by dead_ at 9:25 AM on March 6, 2007


Libby is the only person charged in the case

So that means he was the only one who did anything wrong, right? So justice is done! Awesome! I'm gonna go back to reading celebrity gossip now, thx.
posted by pinespree at 9:26 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


(clapping on 2 and 4)
Singer; Oh happy day
Choir: Oh, happy day!

Fuck. Yeah. Eat it, Cheney.
posted by fourcheesemac at 9:28 AM on March 6, 2007


He has no one to plame but himself for this leak.
posted by hal9k at 9:29 AM on March 6, 2007


If he was going to flip, he'd have done it long ago. They knew his case was weak. He's taking the fall for Dark Lord Cheney.

Of course, the fact that Libby was obstructing means that Cheney was "involved". Does that mean Bush fires his ass now? lol!
posted by DU at 9:29 AM on March 6, 2007


I wonder if he's really willing to spend 30 years in prison for Cheney. But then Cheney shoots someone in the face, and that person apologizes to him, so who knows.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 9:32 AM on March 6, 2007 [13 favorites]


My mother pointed out, just the other day, that if Cheney exits, W gets to pick himself a new VP...perhaps an heir to the throne...?
posted by taosbat at 9:33 AM on March 6, 2007


When I first saw this picture, I swore he was being followed out by Darth Vader.

Understandable mistake. It's really Dick Cheney making sure Libby keeps his yap shut on the way to prison.
posted by mazola at 9:33 AM on March 6, 2007


it's only 20 months until he gets his well-deserved pardon, after all
posted by matteo at 9:34 AM on March 6, 2007 [7 favorites]


I'm still holding out hope that this was just the warm-up. The wheels of justice turn slowly, but they grind exceedingly small.
posted by Faint of Butt at 9:35 AM on March 6, 2007


Exactly, matteo. This means nothing other than that the Dark Side won, yet again.
posted by Optamystic at 9:36 AM on March 6, 2007


No way Libby serves a full term. He'll be pardoned as W leaves office.

Also, I dearly, dearly hope and crave that Bush thinks he can annoint an heir to the throne by picking a new VP.
posted by DU at 9:39 AM on March 6, 2007


taosbat writes "My mother pointed out, just the other day, that if Cheney exits, W gets to pick himself a new VP...perhaps an heir to the throne...?"

Yeah, 'cause being part of the Bush administration is going to be the key to electoral success in '08. Trust me, any one who wants a future in politics would avoid that job like the plague.
posted by mr_roboto at 9:41 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


My mother pointed out, just the other day, that if Cheney exits, W gets to pick himself a new VP...perhaps an heir to the throne...?

Per the Constitution, if the VP is replaced during the President's term the new appointment must be approved by both houses of Congress.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 9:44 AM on March 6, 2007


Does Libby know enough to hurt Cheney and The Republicans? Then yep, he'll be pardoned. Or... he could always "commit suicide" or "have a heart attack" in prison. (/conspiracy)

Before all that, though, is The Appeal.

What I want to know is, how will this verdict impact Plame's civil suit againt Libby, Cheney and Rove?
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 9:47 AM on March 6, 2007 [2 favorites]


Exactly, matteo. This means nothing other than that the Dark Side won, yet again.

Man, talk about pessimism. When every possible outcome is bad in your mind, you might want to do some soul searching. Or seek professional help.
posted by smackfu at 9:48 AM on March 6, 2007


What are the odds he'll get a pardon before Bush ends his Presidency?
posted by gsb at 9:49 AM on March 6, 2007


Oh dear, someone already said it...
posted by gsb at 9:50 AM on March 6, 2007


I wouldn't be too sure about that pardon. The day after Libby is pardoned he'll be slapped with a subpoena to come sing to Fitz some more, and you can't claim the Fifth if you can't be charged for the crime. And the thing is, they can run it out until the day before W leaves office, but they'll still be liable for what they did in office.

Fitz all but said in his closing arguments to the jury that Cheney is next. Scooter is about the only person who could corroborate a lot of what Cheney would say to defend himself should he get the next indictment -- and as a convicted liar, Scooter is now worthless to him. I think Darth is indeed next in Fitz's sights.
posted by localroger at 9:50 AM on March 6, 2007 [2 favorites]


Thirded, Dr-Baa. The Dark Side among us, except he forgot to change into civvies.
posted by lilithim at 9:51 AM on March 6, 2007


Think Joementum...and the subsequent shift in the Senate when his replacement is a card-carrying Republican...I'm just saying: Be careful what you wish for.
posted by taosbat at 9:52 AM on March 6, 2007


4. 3. 2. 1. PARDON!!! Nothing to see here, move along.
posted by bhouston at 9:52 AM on March 6, 2007


Do keep up, gsb.
posted by imperium at 9:53 AM on March 6, 2007


And keep up me.
posted by imperium at 9:54 AM on March 6, 2007


Clearly, the Bush administration is the target of a vast, left-wing conspiracy.
posted by Nquire at 9:57 AM on March 6, 2007


Fitz all but said in his closing arguments to the jury that Cheney is next.

Please don't tease me. Quote or reliable analysis from legal expert link?
posted by DU at 9:58 AM on March 6, 2007


This Dick Cheney person sounds like a total asshole.
posted by Meatbomb at 10:00 AM on March 6, 2007 [3 favorites]


Per the Constitution, if the VP is replaced during the President's term the new appointment must be approved by both houses of Congress.
That would make for some fascinating political theater, for sure, especially if Joe is called up.
posted by MrMoonPie at 10:02 AM on March 6, 2007


The second link is a little week

a little week is better than a miniscule fortnight.
posted by quonsar at 10:04 AM on March 6, 2007


huzzah!
posted by pruner at 10:04 AM on March 6, 2007


I go to the site that must not be named so you don't have to:

I think this verdict is going to come back to bite the left, though.

It's all about a culture of hate. And hate, naked hate, will bring the wrath of God down upon those that hate.


God hates hates hates haters.
posted by Armitage Shanks at 10:04 AM on March 6, 2007 [6 favorites]


a little week is better than a miniscule fortnight.

Wait a minute, who's on first is really on second?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:08 AM on March 6, 2007


We're not going to get a Cheney indictment, sadly:

No further charges are expected in the case, Fitzgerald said, and no further investigation was planned.

"We're all going back to our day jobs," Fitzgerald said outside the courthouse. "If the information comes to light, or new information comes to us that would warrant us taking some action, we will do that."

posted by EarBucket at 10:10 AM on March 6, 2007


you might want to do some soul searching. Or seek professional help.

or even read some history books. or, shit, just a bunch of old clippings from 1980s newspapers -- two words: Iran-Contras, ie the same guys who were happily recycled for Iraq Attaq.

pardons -- and an impotent, subservient media which, to add insult to injury, is also labeled as "liberal" lol -- are a magic, splendid tool. sorry if ruins your otherwise admirable cheerful mojo.
posted by matteo at 10:12 AM on March 6, 2007


It's all about a culture of hate. And hate, naked hate, will bring the wrath of God down upon those that hate.

It's quotes like these that make me just pause in amazement. How can someone be so out-of-touch, so unaware, so bassackwards, so....words fail me. How is Libby's choice to lie to a grand jury part of a "culture of hate" on the left?
posted by DU at 10:13 AM on March 6, 2007


Where some saw Darth Vader, I saw a dude with a gun, which was much more unnerving.
posted by boo_radley at 10:14 AM on March 6, 2007


Just to be clear, matteo, what outcome in this case would mean that the dark side DIDN'T win?
posted by proj at 10:14 AM on March 6, 2007


Hooray!
posted by MythMaker at 10:16 AM on March 6, 2007


Fitzgerald is everything you want from someone in the U.S. Atty’s office. He’s tough, impartial and absolutely dedicated. Damn glad he’s in Illinois (really, it’s a target rich environment for corruption).
posted by Smedleyman at 10:17 AM on March 6, 2007


The end of a really nice carreer in the Law. But he's short-timer for sure.
I went to private school with the son of man (a mid level repub operative in the 1970s) who did 18 mos in club fed for Watergate. When he got out, his political carreer over, he bought an everyday restaurant, but it was nevertheless a lucrative business.
The building was enteed shortly thereafter onto the national register of historic monuments meaning that the gov't would pay for upkeep on his business property ever after. . . quid.pro.quo.

I wonder what Libby's retirement bennies will be like?
posted by Fupped Duck at 10:17 AM on March 6, 2007 [2 favorites]


Unless Scooter does a tell-all, Cheney's safe. Even if Scooter keeps his mouth shut and eats the sentence, he gets pardoned. I'm sure he has a deal where he gets paid for every month he's in prison. Call it long-term disability.

About the only good thing that might come out of this is if it helps the Plames win a civil case against Cheney and his staff for damages.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:19 AM on March 6, 2007


Fitz all but said in his closing arguments to the jury that Cheney is next.

In which case he'll have an exquisitely timed fatal heart attack, just like Kenny-boy.
posted by Fupped Duck at 10:19 AM on March 6, 2007


Bush, 9/30/2003: Listen, I know of nobody -- I don't know of anybody in my administration who leaked classified information. If somebody did leak classified information, I'd like to know it, and we'll take the appropriate action. And this investigation is a good thing.

And matteo's right. Democrats are held to a much higher standard than Republicans are by the "librul" media. And a pardon is already in the works. But maybe this is the stain that leads Bush's approval to drop from 30 to 20 percent.

A boy can dream, can't he?
posted by bardic at 10:21 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


I wonder if Libby now thinks it was worth lying for his fat fucker boss.

Rest assured when Libby's in prison, Dick's going to sit in a very expensive restaurant to a nice thick steak, extra rare. And it will be delicious. It always is.
posted by four panels at 10:22 AM on March 6, 2007 [3 favorites]


Oh, I forgot about Plame's civil suit. Good. This ensures that it will get tons of attention, even as right-wing lapdogs and "legal experts" shriek "Nothing to see here!!!"
posted by bardic at 10:24 AM on March 6, 2007


That would make for some fascinating political theater, for sure, especially if Joe is called up.

If you mean Lieberman that's ludicrous, if only for the fact that a Democratic governor would appoint a more Democrat-friendly replacement. It won't go to any candidate or potential candidate either because under the circumstances the position would be tainted and would be impossible for the placeholder to even run. So odds are he'd appoint either Rice or an outgoing Republican Senator retiring in 2008, either of whom would sail past the Senate for varying reasons and avoid a major media shitstorm for Bush.

That's all, of course, on the assumption Cheney resigned, which just isn't going to happen.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 10:25 AM on March 6, 2007


CT has a Republican governor.
posted by DU at 10:30 AM on March 6, 2007


XQUZYPHYR - If you mean Lieberman that's ludicrous, if only for the fact that a Democratic governor would appoint a more Democrat-friendly replacement.

Connecticut has a Republican Governor.
posted by pruner at 10:31 AM on March 6, 2007


FYI, even if a Republican were appointed to Lieberman's seat, it wouldn't change alter the majority/minority status in the Senate, since the organizing resolution that was adopted at the start of the session did not include a provision whereby control of the chamber (or committee assignments) would change if the balance of seats did.
posted by pruner at 10:33 AM on March 6, 2007


That's all, of course, on the assumption Cheney resigned, which just isn't going to happen.

That's the key point. Neither Bush nor Cheney has ever done a single thing to benefit someone else at their own expense--why would they start now? Cheney will continue to do what's best for Cheney even as the Bush presidency goes off a cliff.
posted by Epenthesis at 10:38 AM on March 6, 2007


Yeah, but his point stands. I'm giddier than anyone about this but please -- Cheney just digs himself in deeper. The spin from the WH is already along the lines of "Mr. Bush deeply respects the hard work and effort put in by Prosecutor Fitzgerald, but ultimately the American people should also know about the hard work and wonderful things Scooter Libby accomplished for his country when this unfortunate misunderstanding took place."

Not a direct quotation, but watch for it -- within a velvet glove, Bush and his lawyers will basically say that the Executive branch has the right to revoke decisions by the Legislative (signing statements) and the Judiciary. And the press will say, gee, what innovative legal thinking.
posted by bardic at 10:40 AM on March 6, 2007 [2 favorites]


I don't see Cheney as the type to resign. He just seems to stubborn.
posted by drezdn at 10:40 AM on March 6, 2007


Fitzmas? More like St. Patrick's Day.
posted by joseph_elmhurst at 10:41 AM on March 6, 2007 [3 favorites]


I don't see Cheney as the type to resign. He just seems to stubborn.
posted by drezdn at 10:41 AM on March 6, 2007


Part of me was really happy -

"They outed our own spy, they got busted! Now if only we can arrange for them to be hanged..."

The other part of me was realistic -

"He'll be pardoned by the end of the week, none of this will have any impact. The media is willfully blind and will forget all this within the next month. Cheney just had a blood clot, so there's his medical get-out-of-jail-free card..."

It hurts too much to care anymore. Until we have a responsible media to help hold our government to account, well, what's the point?
posted by From Bklyn at 10:43 AM on March 6, 2007


More awesome: The National Reviews Byron York pooh-poohing the upcoming Libby verdict (ZOMG nine whole days obviously this is a farce!)

Tbogg responds.
posted by bardic at 10:45 AM on March 6, 2007


Until we have a responsible media to help hold our government to account, well, what's the point?

Responsible mainstream media. The one that the masses use to form the "general consensus" on issues.
posted by wfc123 at 10:47 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


He better not be pardoned.

We all know now that this administration gave false information to the public leading up to this war.
They should go to jail for that alone.

But to retaliate against someone because they had the courage to point out the inconsistencies is bullshit and no way can this guy be let off the hook.

And the most important reason why they can't pardon him. They would be overturning the decision of the jury which represents the people of the united states. not the select few corruptly running it.

in fact write your democratic senators and ask them to take away the presidents pardoning power. seriously in this day and age he shouldnt have it.
posted by hpsell at 10:49 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


And let's not forget how intimately involved in all this the media was -- Miller, Russert, Cooper et al. For the first few years of the Iraq occupation, when things were supposedly going swimmingly, these idiots were breathless boosters for this war. They wanted to be on the "winning" team. Their nipples hardened at the mere thought that Darth Cheney might deign to let them in on the strategery.

And now everyone can see that they were played like freakin' violins.

Which is to say, I hardly expect this to lead to the cleaning-out that the inside-the beltway punditocracy desperately needs, but at the very least some of these people with integrity will go for early retirement. They have no business carrying the title "journalist," if it's to mean anything any longer.

And some neat trivia: Libby was Mark Rich's lawyer when Clinton pardoned him.
posted by bardic at 10:49 AM on March 6, 2007


It's all about a culture of hate. And hate, naked hate, will bring the wrath of God down upon those that hate.

And faggots too, apparently.

I love a world where being against torture and the invasion of other sovereign nations is hate. Being pro-torture and pro-kidnapping of foreigners abroad to be delivered to torturers is also equal to being kind and compassionate.

I love a world where being outraged by the sight of war veterans living in filth and among vermin means you hate the troops, and where the people responsible for the filth and vermin still being a going concern are the responsible patriots.

I love a world where cheering for the circus atmosphere of the public hanging of a former head of state is good and proper, but where merely thinking that the death of another public official from another country could be a positive thing is tantamount to treason.

I love a world where the people closest to those who poison the public discourse for a living using all means ranging from childish insults to libellous accusations of criminal behaviour are respected as authorities when they denounce their opponents as being "shrill and angry".

But most of all I love a world where those who constantly and often literally betray from the most powerful of positions constantly turn about and accuse anyone who disagrees with them of being traitors, "aiding the enemy" or "validating the enemy's tactics".

So clearly there is still much to love about the United States of America and its government. It's quite touching, really.
posted by clevershark at 10:50 AM on March 6, 2007 [38 favorites]


I remember reading something that gave an interesting interpretation regarding Cheney stepping down and Leiberman being chosen for the VP. Dems would face a horrible predicament whether to vote for him or against him.

If they voted for him and he became VP, CT's gov'nor would appoint a GOP replacement, tying the Senate and giving Joe the swing vote on any ties.

If they voted against him there is a good chance that he might change parties in retaliation and tie up the Senate.

Either way they're screwed if it does happen.

I am still pleased with today's news and look forward to seeing what happens next. I was a little worried the other day when the jury asked for the definition of 'reasonable doubt.' I was fearing a total acquittal.
posted by daHIFI at 10:51 AM on March 6, 2007


> it's only 20 months until he gets his well-deserved pardon, after all

I assume you mean the pardon for the former President (and no doubt the former Vice President and the former Deputy Chief of Staff for Nixon Emulation also) by then-President Hillary or Barack or whomever. I feel sure the Bush team can count on any conceivable Democratic winner to be willing to play (Heal Our Long National Nightmare v.2.0.)

Of course just in case it's President Kucinich then no doubt they all already own houses in places with no extradition treaty.
posted by jfuller at 10:59 AM on March 6, 2007


Assuming that Cheney could possibly be motivated by any other reason than selfishness is highly naive. Stepping down isn't even on his radar -- that would be an admission of wrong-doing. This Executive branch, by its own legal understanding, can never be wrong.
posted by bardic at 11:05 AM on March 6, 2007


And here comes the spin -- from The National Review, a cry of "Pardon Scooter," because (*gag*) it's Clinton's fault.
posted by bardic at 11:08 AM on March 6, 2007 [3 favorites]


Y'know, sorry to rain on the parade here, but no one has been or (apparently) will be tried for the leak itself. Just for perjury and obstruction of justice. From this article:

"I will say there was a tremendous amount of sympathy for Mr. Libby on the jury. It was said a number of times, 'What are we doing with this guy here? Where's Rove? Where are these other guys?' " Collins said. "I'm not saying we didn't think Mr. Libby was guilty of the things we found him guilty of. It seemed like he was, as Mr. Wells put it, he was the fall guy."

Though the case never proved a White House conspiracy to out Plame as retribution for Wilson's criticism, Fitzgerald showed how adamant some members of the Bush administration were to discredit Wilson."

posted by dilettante at 11:11 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


Couldn't happen to a nicer guy. I imagine a fellow named 'Scooter' will be real popular in prison. I hope they give him a cellmate with family serving in the useless war his lies helped support.
posted by jonmc at 11:16 AM on March 6, 2007


Another fact, that has miraculously been reduced to trivia: Plame's work focused on nucular proliferation in the middle east and when she was compromised, her contacts and sources were compromised in all the worst ways.

http://tinyurl.com/33nc78
posted by Fupped Duck at 11:16 AM on March 6, 2007


History will not remember this administration favorably and the evidence provided at this trial will be part of the reason why.
posted by caddis at 11:18 AM on March 6, 2007


"FOOLS. That lickspittle Libby was nothing, an errant grain of sand in the cogs of the machine I have built. Nothing shall prevent the Dark Lord from his rightful vengeance against the doomsayers of the East! WAR WITH BABYLON, WAR WITH PERSIA! WAR AND ITS PLUNDER FOR ME, FOREVER. NOTHING WILL STOP ME! NOTHI---

AGGHHH! MASTER! Master, be kind, O Master, please! My pills, where are my pills...no, Master, I serve only you..., yes...my Lord, my Master...please, spare me, I have much work left to do...

Kaff. Oh. That...he watches me at all times, Master does, but soon, soon...no, Master, I serve only you. Only you at all times.

Now, for the final campaign against the Middle Kingdom. And then my ziggurats will stand above the blasted plains of Asia, and only then shall the Earth be prepared for His coming."
posted by solistrato at 11:19 AM on March 6, 2007 [2 favorites]


Props to Fitz; he gives me hope that there are still Americans that understand that the rule of law is our greatest asset. It doesn't always end the way everybody likes, but the process is paramount. As long as there are honorable watchdogs, people like Bush and Cheney cannot keep signing executive orders and lying without at least worrying a little they'll be busted.

The problem, as I see it, is that so many people have drunk the Koolaid that actively holding your leadership responsible is the equivalent of being disrespectful to your parents; that demanding our leaders take the right way instead of the easy way is unpatriotic. I visited LGF to see the reactions, and the sycophantic and slavish dedication to authority demonstrated by most of the posters is scary.

Sadly, a large chunk of our country sees this as an attack on the administration - not a success of the system as it should be.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 11:27 AM on March 6, 2007


Another fact, that has miraculously been reduced to trivia: Plame's work focused on nucular proliferation in the middle east and when she was compromised, her contacts and sources were compromised in all the worst ways.

If there's anything that's clear about this current administration, it's that actual intel is worthless compared to sensationalistic sound-bites that can be used to scare up the eager-to-comply populace into supporting a war caused by political motivations established a decade or more back.

So, from the Administration's point of view nothing of value was lost. One might even argue that in their way of thinking the quicker they shoo the experienced, reality-based intel analysts out the door and replace them with Biblical scholars specializing in Revelations, the better. Of course it's not as overt or transparent as that, but the end result is the same.
posted by clevershark at 11:32 AM on March 6, 2007


Fox News declares Libby NOT guilty
posted by pruner at 11:45 AM on March 6, 2007


Fox News declares Libby NOT guilty

And Mark Foley is a member of the Democratic Party.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:51 AM on March 6, 2007


Fox News declares Libby NOT guilty

"The bad news is, you're getting the chair for murder. The good news is that they acquitted you of drunk and disorderly conduct."
posted by mkultra at 11:52 AM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


Sadly, a large chunk of our country sees this...

I would guess that (even more sadly) a large chunk of the US does not see this AT ALL.

And, fwiw, I would also guess that the folks who openly cheer for Team Bush are an even smaller chunk.
posted by jaronson at 11:52 AM on March 6, 2007


the sycophantic and slavish dedication to authority

These verdicts are a travesty! The work of activist jurists, I tell 'ya.
posted by ericb at 11:55 AM on March 6, 2007


Connecticut has a Republican Governor.

Oops. You're right. I was thinking of the recently-turned-Democratic Massachusetts. That actually does make a case for Lieberman, but I doubt he'd be stupid enough to abandon a seat he'll keep until at least 2012 for one he'd have to leave in 2009.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 11:55 AM on March 6, 2007


Actually should be *activist jurors*.
posted by ericb at 11:56 AM on March 6, 2007


“So clearly there is still much to love about the United States of America and its government.”

Valid criticisms. But that’s all rooted in partisan hacking. We do have Fitzgerald. And more people like him than you might think. More than enough to offset the dufuses...at least in quality if not quantity. I think justice eventually will be done. There’s always enough people working hard to overcome the accusors, the summer patriots and fighting keyboarders.
posted by Smedleyman at 11:57 AM on March 6, 2007


I don't see Cheney as the type to resign. He just seems to stubborn.

Cheney is certainly the only person I can think of for whom stubborn works as a verb.

The building was enteed shortly thereafter onto the national register of historic monuments meaning that the gov't would pay for upkeep on his business property ever after. . . quid.pro.quo.

The National Register of Historic Places does not guarantee upkeep -- in fact, it is frequently unable to guarantee that an owner doesn't demolish his structure. It does make an owner eligible for tax credits for money spent on rehabilitation and adaptive reuse, and gives it some protection from demolition by federally-funded projects like highways, but that's about it, other than pride.
posted by dhartung at 12:06 PM on March 6, 2007


Think Darth Vader cutting out Luke Skywalker clips with a penknife and then whining about it to his subordinates within the Evil Empire and you get a decent mental image of how much Cheney lost as a result of this trial.
- Andrew Cohen on the Losers of this verdict
posted by frecklefaerie at 12:20 PM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


"That's guilty, guilty, guilty!"
/ob Slackmeyer

The comments on Tom Maguire's blog are heeeelarious.

The devil is afoot in the world today. The bad guys are winning. Not just in this case, but around the world. Pray. (I am serious).

posted by Lentrohamsanin at 12:22 PM on March 6, 2007


That actually does make a case for Lieberman, but I doubt he'd be stupid enough to abandon a seat he'll keep until at least 2012 for one he'd have to leave in 2009.

I suppose it would depend upon which seat he's got a hankering for in '09...POTUS? He could be Joe the Pacifier. ;) Just kidding...my mom's kind of a scary person to talk to sometimes.
posted by taosbat at 12:29 PM on March 6, 2007


As somebody remarked on the Beeb:
"On his way out of the court, he bumped into George Bush and was heard to say, "Oh, Pardon Me."

Bittoffanasspounding in a low level security prison* for him until after Nov 2008 then a pardon and a very, very large brown envelope for his sacrifice.

*or maybe he will keep out an on appeal until the pardon
posted by Webbster at 12:29 PM on March 6, 2007


In related news, suicide bombers killed another 93 people today in Iraq.
posted by exogenous at 12:30 PM on March 6, 2007


I get the very distinct impression that Joe Lieberman thinks he's gonna be John McCain's VP.
posted by pruner at 12:41 PM on March 6, 2007


On Cheney being next: In closing arguments Fitz said "there is a cloud over this vice presidency, a cloud which is still there because Libby lied." (paraphrasing from the FDL liveblog.) Fitz did not take this back at the post-verdict presser, reiterating it even as he said the investigation was over.

We have seen that Fitzgerald is a straight arrow who doesn't do anything unless all his i's are dotted and t's crossed. He knows there is a more serious crime afoot and he probably knows whodunnit, but can't prove it. I don't believe for a microsecond that the whole Libby thing was just becuase the veep's aide lying to the grand jury was the best case he could make. Fitz either thinks he can roll Libby or wants Libby out of the way.

Fitz qualified his "the investigation is over" comment with "unless more information surfaces." There are lots of ways that might happen. Of course Fitz is going to say it's over, because that's what his position in the game requires him to say. But it's only over if everyone involved with this crime Fitz knows happened, including Libby, keeps their traps shut til the end of time.

Maybe they'll all be that loyal. But I'm not sure they are all that smart. And don't forget, whoever was involved with outing Plame can still be prosecuted for it after W leaves office if they aren't pardoned for it first. W would not only have to pardon Libby, but whoever else Libby would be likely to implicate in compelled testimony -- since a pardon is just as good as use immunity as far as blowing away your fifth amendment rights. Maybe it'll be pardons all around like Iran Contra but they'll have to admit to a lot of gosh-darnit wrongdoing to do that, and I really think this bunch is too proud and arrogant to be bothered.
posted by localroger at 12:41 PM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


Fox News declares Libby NOT guilty
posted by pruner


That's likely because he was found Not Guilty of one of the charges - and I'm pretty sure most news media outlets (FOX, CNN) cycle text in that area.
posted by NationalKato at 12:47 PM on March 6, 2007




I don't understand why Fitzgerald would say there was a cloud over the Vice Presidency in his closing argument unless he was going to go after Cheney, and I'm sure why he wouldn't go after Cheney for obstruction of justice and conspiracy.

In related news, suicide bombers killed another 93 people today in Iraq.

Oh, that's just that "one bombing a day that discourages everybody."
posted by kirkaracha at 12:58 PM on March 6, 2007


I get the very distinct impression that Joe Lieberman thinks he's gonna be John McCain's VP.
posted by pruner


Could be...or, it could be Joe's thinking that might be aiming little low... Oh well, it's all hypothetical anyway right? Cheney's a healthy Dark Lord, yes?
posted by taosbat at 1:00 PM on March 6, 2007


Best comment today on a conservative blog (LGF):

"This trial reminds me of the one that Pontius Pilate presided over."
posted by fungible at 1:02 PM on March 6, 2007


Valid criticisms. But that’s all rooted in partisan hacking.

That used to be true, until the media basically surrendered the political discourse to the wingnuts and began reporting their drooling utterances as 'mainstream'. Coulter catches flack for calling Edwards a "faggot" at CPAC, but what's conveniently forgotten is that she has done so more than once before in public without causing a raised eyebrow (on Tweety's show, to cite but one example).

In fact the "goalpost" that marks the limit of what's considered acceptable discourse is so far in fascist territory that any argument short of calling for a literal genocide is seen as reasonable nowadays. In a world where Brit Hume is considered a journalist there is no denying that there is something very wrong with the world of journalism.
posted by clevershark at 1:03 PM on March 6, 2007


National Review Editorial: Pardon Libby.
posted by ericb at 1:04 PM on March 6, 2007


Bush 'saddened' by Libby verdict...meanies; see, he needs a pacifier to suck.
posted by taosbat at 1:11 PM on March 6, 2007


jaronson : I would guess that (even more sadly) a large chunk of the US does not see this AT ALL.

Based on the fact that one of my (very right wing) employees just looked at one of TVs on the floor and said "Who's this Libby guy that's all over the news?" I would say that your estimation it more or less correct.

I will not admit to the pleasure I took in explaining in great deal 'Who this Libby guy was...'
posted by quin at 1:19 PM on March 6, 2007


in fact write your democratic senators and ask them to take away the presidents pardoning power. seriously in this day and age he shouldnt have it.

You can ask all you want, but they can't do it, and what is required to do it won't happen.
posted by oaf at 1:34 PM on March 6, 2007




hpsell writes "in fact write your democratic senators and ask them to take away the presidents pardoning power. seriously in this day and age he shouldnt have it."

It's in the constitution. Article 2, Section 2.
posted by mr_roboto at 1:43 PM on March 6, 2007


“...the media basically surrendered the political discourse to the wingnuts...the "goalpost" that marks the limit of what's considered acceptable discourse is so far in fascist territory...”

Not gonna argue with you there. And yeah, journalism is in the dark ages. But - proof of the pudding is in the eating, man. Say whatever they will*, Fitzgerald nailed him on 4 of 5 counts. Rule of law wins over partisan b.s. And really, talk is cheap.
I’ll grant though there seems to be a big purge right now in the legal bureaucracy, and that’s bad. But I dunno, at some point you get enough people saying the game is too rigged to play anymore and that’s a revolution.

(*Although, y’know folks who have a real problem with Fitzgerald had best not come to Chicago unless they have a really solid dental plan.)

“The referral to Justice—leaked to the media—was the act of an agency more concerned with shifting the blame for faulty Iraq intelligence than with protecting a supposedly vulnerable agent.”

Yeah, folks with an unlimited black budget untouchable by public scrutiny are just so sensitive to, uh, public scrutiny.

“Whatever his motivations, Fitzgerald adopted the discredited Wilson’s script and focused his three-year investigation on Cheney, Libby, and Rove—and not, inexplicably, on others.”

Weird how he requires evidence and proof dispite having integrity.
(I have to say tho, if Fitzgerald told me something as improbable as the sky was raining hot dogs, I’d probably go pick up some mustard.)

Some of this I can’t understand - even if I’m all for a guy who happens to be on trial (can’t think of anyone off hand) I might be sad to see the guy in prison, but I’d rather see justice prevail and him get a fair trial than see him get out of it by paying someone off or dodging through some goofy rich-guy hole or some such.

I mean ok - I understand the ‘he was politically railroaded’ arguments. But then where did those folks stand on the Clinton blowjob thing?
But again - doesn’t matter. The dog barks, the caravan passes. Here I think the system worked and it doesn’t matter what people blog about it.
posted by Smedleyman at 1:49 PM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


Smedleyman: We do have Fitzgerald. And more people like him than you might think.

Alas, we have fewer than we did a couple of months ago. Bush has fired at least eight U.S. Attorneys for either prosecuting Republican corruption too vigorously or Democratic corruption too slowly.
posted by JackFlash at 3:24 PM on March 6, 2007


this is just the latest example of the criminalization of crime.
posted by pruner at 3:56 PM on March 6, 2007




"This trial reminds me of the one that Pontius Pilate presided over."

Ho yeah... is that the guy with the lisp that stood on the balcony with Bigus Dickus? And the crowd kept shouting joke names.

Pontius:
"No more 'Wuh-wees Wod-juh the Pwum-uh!' or 'Wuh-wees Woo-dolph the Wed Nosed Wain-deer!' I want a seeweeious name damn you! What is so funny Centuh-wee-un? Why does the cwowed titter so? Are they mocking me?"

Because it reminds me of that too.
posted by tkchrist at 5:29 PM on March 6, 2007


People who think a Presidential pardon is an automatic benefit for Scooter and this administration have not been following this story closely enough. It could even be construed as part of a conspiracy, which could entangle the Vice President and President even further. As mentioned above, once pardoned, Libby would not be entitled to his 5th Amendment right to silence and he could be MADE to testify, that could work out poorly for the Administration. And you are also forgetting the civil trial pending. Not to mention the hit the Republican party would take politically.
posted by spock at 5:48 PM on March 6, 2007






A hopeflessly confused jury does not come to unanimous agreement on four of five counts. According to the jury member that talked afterwards (the WaPo reporter) only ONE juror disagreed with a guilty verdict on the final count (which everyone following the case said was the weakest count).
posted by spock at 5:56 PM on March 6, 2007


O frabjous day! Calloo callay!

No, I'm not gloating at all.

I'm just happy that maybe something might finally be done to address certain ongoing problems in prisons.

But if that isn't fixed, I don't particularly mind, either. Kind of a win-win for me, really.
posted by UbuRoivas at 5:59 PM on March 6, 2007


This could be worth dragging out from the archives at this point:

Scooter Libby wasn't dubbed Scooter by the President. The obnoxious fucker went around and MADE everyone call him Scooter instead of his proper name, and MADE SURE we called him Scooter by CORRECTING US WHENEVER WE CALLED HIM BY HIS TRUE NAME.

One guy actually called him by his true name to someone else in his own office, and Scooter, who was walking by, popped in and CORRECTED HIM and then sped off.

----

Aliquid posted: "How do you personally feel about the whole situation?"

I think it is ridiculous that this guy wanted such a shitty nickname which he got because he rubbed his asshole all over the carpet when moving around as a toddler. Also, and this is just rumor that I have not personally heard from Scooter himself, but he obsessively cultivates the nickname because it makes him appear less threatening to his enemies. What a fucking psycho.

We've speculated that he did that scooting as a toddler because of a throwback mongoloid mental defect that caused him to be unable to balance on his hind feet. The fact that he is inhuman in his mannerisms supports this theory and I endorse it with my full backing.

Also, after a while, we called him Cooter behind his back, because the guy is a complete obnoxious nosy cunt. One of the reasons why he is on the hot seat right now is because he got no love from anyone.

posted by UbuRoivas at 6:21 PM on March 6, 2007


Fox News Spins Libby Verdict: Jury Was "Hopelessly Confused"

But is it possible that Libby's counsel will plead 'hopeless confusion'?
posted by zennie at 6:22 PM on March 6, 2007


heh - to find that mefi link above, i had to google "rumsfeld underwear" - another black mark against my name in the office intarwebs server log
posted by UbuRoivas at 6:26 PM on March 6, 2007


MeFi: another black mark against my name in the office intarwebs server log
posted by caddis at 6:51 PM on March 6, 2007




It's Jimi time! Help me...
posted by taosbat at 7:19 PM on March 6, 2007


"The more the Democrats and liberals gloat, the better news it is for us. They are POKING THE BEAR! They'll be SORRY!!"

What makes this Rush quote even less savory is the fact that Libby wrote a crappy novel which features, as a major plot point, bestiality between a young girl and a bear, the latter which is poked with a stick whenever he wanders away from his human love slave.
posted by maryh at 7:43 PM on March 6, 2007


The more the Democrats and liberals gloat, the better news it is for us. They are POKING THE BEAR! They'll be SORRY!

Actually, from a rest-of-world perspective, it's more like:

"The eagle has just finally managed to shake loose the second or third of its many legions of hideous crab-lice. Meanwhile, it is still flapping around in circles in a shitty quagmire whilst being bitten all over by mosquitoes, has lost half its feathers, is covered in filthy chancres, mistakes its own left wing for an enemy, and scratches out its own eye to spite its face. Luckily for the eagle, it is blissfully unaware that all the other critters in the bush are watching this tragicomic spectacle with an ever-increasing mixture of bemusement & horror, because, naturally, its head is firmly planted up its own arse."
posted by UbuRoivas at 7:58 PM on March 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


What makes this Rush quote even less savory is the fact that Libby wrote a crappy novel which features, as a major plot point, bestiality between the Vice President and a bear, the latter which is poked with a stick whenever he wanders away from his human love slave, Scooter Libby.
posted by bitter-girl.com at 9:05 PM on March 6, 2007


...there's a pardon, pardon, pardon on the table, table, table. : <
posted by amberglow at 4:08 AM on March 7, 2007


The more the Democrats and liberals gloat, the better news it is for us. They are POKING THE BEAR! They'll be SORRY!

... using the term "poking the bear" probably isn't the best choice of phrases when talking about Scooter Libby. ...
posted by amberglow at 4:23 AM on March 7, 2007


Libby lied, troops died--...As Libby's defense counsel insisted, Scooter was merely one of many in the White House assailing Wilson's integrity. Others, including Bush's political strategist Karl Rove, were involved. To a degree, the smear campaign was for a time successful, fueled by the Republican-controlled Senate Intelligence Committee and elements of the Washington press corps. But the trial exhibits - documents entered by the special prosecutor - knocked down every single one of their falsehoods. ...
posted by amberglow at 6:48 AM on March 7, 2007




rudepundit--Advice to the Bush White House: Why Not Pardon Scooter Libby? You Got Any Honor Left To Lose?:--...So, really, and, c'mon, why the fuck not just pardon Scooter Libby after yesterday's verdict saying that the once single most important person to the Vice President is a perjuring liar? ...
You've sunk so low, become so openly vile and depraved and bloated and corrupt that, you know, the Washington Post could run a series of articles on how the toilet in the Oval Office washroom is made from the bones of still-living Iraqi children who are kept in the attic of the Vice President's residence because deboned children are easier on his heart and ...

posted by amberglow at 7:51 PM on March 7, 2007


hysterical! David Gergen Is Mentally Retarded
posted by amberglow at 8:36 PM on March 7, 2007


Befehlsnotstand
posted by amberglow at 8:50 AM on March 8, 2007








Re: ericb's Waxman link; Valerie Plame to Testify in Congress & they invited St. Pat he hasn't responded yet...
posted by taosbat at 6:18 PM on March 8, 2007


Ahmana send Libby a harmonica. Maybe even some pomade.
posted by Smedleyman at 11:08 PM on March 8, 2007


lube might be more useful--or a yellowcake with a crowbar inside?
posted by amberglow at 5:01 AM on March 9, 2007


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