More Luxury Hotels Required
June 11, 2007 7:41 AM   Subscribe

SimCity 2008, Scenario: Beijing. Prepare your city for the 2008 Olympics. Raze slums, build luxury hotels, and stadiums. Make the nation, and the world, proud!
posted by SansPoint (38 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
I guess this won't be ending well. Allow me to summarize in advance: China sucks. But I'm not a racist or anything.
posted by GuyZero at 7:42 AM on June 11, 2007


I think you mean [NOT RACIST]. Are you not from around here or something? [NOT RACIST].
posted by ND¢ at 7:44 AM on June 11, 2007


That game sucks. It keeps asking you to build things after you run out of space.
posted by delmoi at 7:50 AM on June 11, 2007 [2 favorites]


Which round is flying units?
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 7:51 AM on June 11, 2007


Can we raze this post?
posted by spicynuts at 7:57 AM on June 11, 2007


Are you not from around here or something? [NOT RACIST].

I think what you meant was [NOT AROUND-HERE-IST]
posted by spicynuts at 7:58 AM on June 11, 2007


Had the same experience as delmoi and can't be fucked with doing it all again. Is the end boss hard?
posted by slimepuppy at 7:58 AM on June 11, 2007


That's the worst "game" I've seen in a while. I'm open to the message, but there must be a better way to deliver it.
posted by mrgrimm at 8:02 AM on June 11, 2007


There has to be a better way to manage all those resources in real life [NOT ECONOMIST].
posted by Smart Dalek at 8:04 AM on June 11, 2007


Sufficient land has not been cleared!
posted by inconsequentialist at 8:08 AM on June 11, 2007


An hour later, I wanted more.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 8:11 AM on June 11, 2007 [2 favorites]


This game reminds me of that Counting Crows song with the line "Then she looks up at the building and says shes thinking of jumping. She says shes tired of life she must be tired of something". [NOT ROUND-HERE-IST]
posted by ND¢ at 8:12 AM on June 11, 2007 [1 favorite]


That game was about as much fun as working in the Lekit Stationery Factory.
posted by doublesix at 8:13 AM on June 11, 2007


A more dignified treatment of the same problem: "Er shi jiu ri" by Aric Queen and an acompanying FLICKR set.
posted by RavinDave at 8:16 AM on June 11, 2007


God, that page's logo really sucks.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 8:22 AM on June 11, 2007


This post is eponysterical.
posted by MrMustard at 8:24 AM on June 11, 2007


Get out of my head ND¢, I happen to be listening to that exact song while reading this thread. [NOT THE HIMALAYANS VERSION-IST]

And yea, its going to be a CF.
posted by SirOmega at 8:30 AM on June 11, 2007


totalitarian regime isn't nice to people SHOCKER
posted by DU at 8:37 AM on June 11, 2007


They should have used the unlimited money cheat.
posted by i_am_a_Jedi at 8:41 AM on June 11, 2007


Is this the game with Mario and Sonic in it together?
posted by EatTheWeak at 8:41 AM on June 11, 2007 [1 favorite]


porntipsguzzardo forever!

Oh my god, I can't believe I still remember that.
posted by redbeard at 9:00 AM on June 11, 2007 [3 favorites]


DU, you forgot [NOT TOTALITARIANIST]
posted by GuyZero at 9:04 AM on June 11, 2007


Still, this was better than Simcity 4.
posted by jefbla at 9:04 AM on June 11, 2007


The medium is the message.
posted by puddleglum at 9:09 AM on June 11, 2007


Well for all the whining, at leas their building high density. Here in the U.S. we just let urban cores rot, while eating up thousands of square KM on exurbs and sprawl so that everyone needs to drive around in Giant SUVs for several minutes in order to get anything done.

The Chinese need to learn: real wealth isn't living in a sweet condo in the city, it's having your own acreage and a giant SUV. Baring that, a huge house packed up next other huge houses. Bonus points if it looks exactly the same as everyone next to it.

High-density living, like the Chinese are building here is much better for the environment then U.S. style exurbs.
posted by delmoi at 9:19 AM on June 11, 2007 [1 favorite]


It was much better live, let me tell you.
posted by Pollomacho at 9:20 AM on June 11, 2007


...everyone needs to drive around in Giant SUVs for several minutes in order to get anything done.

s/needs/does anyway/
posted by DU at 9:21 AM on June 11, 2007


The Chinese need to learn: real wealth isn't living in a sweet condo in the city, it's having your own acreage and a giant SUV. Baring that, a huge house packed up next other huge houses. Bonus points if it looks exactly the same as everyone next to it.

Um, they definitely know this already. That's why the government had to put "limits" on new villa construction in Beijing Province.
posted by Pollomacho at 9:24 AM on June 11, 2007


[NOT ANTI-AMERICANIST] remind me to move to China. Im sure a western "prince" such as myself would life like the last emporer over there.
posted by subaruwrx at 10:02 AM on June 11, 2007


Delmoi, I take it you haven't been to Beijing. It sprawls. That's why they have 5 concentric ringroads. The difference between Beijing and Hong Kong couldn't be more stark in this regard.

And yes, the demolishing of Hutongs is frequent, and done with careless disregard for the people living there. I saw it happen firsthand, right beside where a friend was living, literally on the other side of the road. Somewhere I have slides of still inhabited, half demolished houses. The families may have been living there for as long as the buildings have been around. These aren't just slums. The real slums look nothing like the Hutongs.

Most of these neighborhoods have been around since well before the communists. Some even date from the Qing dynasty. Of course, most of these Hutongs aren't brimming with the touristy charm of the ones that are designated culturally important by the central government, and of course, many would be considered unsafe and primitive by modern standards. However, this hardly justifies families who have never known any other home being evicted and being compensated whatever the corrupt official in charge thinks is fair.
posted by [expletive deleted] at 10:29 AM on June 11, 2007


Oh, that said, this game sucks. I DON'T HAVE ROOM FOR MORE LUXURY HOTELS!
posted by [expletive deleted] at 10:30 AM on June 11, 2007


That's why they have 5 concentric ringroads.

Five? You haven't been there for a while, eh? Try 8.

Most of these neighborhoods have been around since well before the communists. Some even date from the Qing dynasty.

Interestingly, the Qing dynasty tore down the old Ming dynasty neighborhoods to move in the incoming Manchurians.

The buildings are certainly historical but the communities that occupy them are questionable. Many of the occupants of the historic hutongs are not, as you say, "families who have never known any other home" and who "have been living there for as long as the buildings have been around," but rather rural imports that occupied urban housing after former aristocrats were forced out in either the Republican or Communist revolutions. Many of those families were exiled to southwestern suburbs (where some interesting exile communities grew up), and some were sent to try their hands at farming in the Gobi desert.

50 years of community development is definitely nothing to sneeze at, it's just not 250 years. Also of note are the break up and destruction of danwei that have existed since the Communist takeover. It is true, having to crap in a communal toilet down the block does tend to lose it's charm after a couple of days, especially in Beijing summer or winter.
posted by Pollomacho at 10:56 AM on June 11, 2007


High-density living, like the Chinese are building here is much better for the environment then U.S. style exurbs.
delmoi

Because if there's one country who the US should be taking environmental protection cues from, it's China. If only we could learn to match their sterling record in this area.
posted by Sangermaine at 11:44 AM on June 11, 2007


50 years of community development is definitely nothing to sneeze at, it's just not 250 years.

Of course, I recognize that, and I didn't say that everyone living there has been there forever. I said that families may have been living there as long as the buildings have. This is espeically likely in the instance I mentioned, which was a 60 year old neighborhood near Wudaokou. I vivdly recal one building, cut in half by the demolition, with an old couple still living in the only remaining room. The old communal toilet was gone, so I'd sometimes see one of them squatting amid the ruins of their old neighborhood. That kind of image doesn't leave your head without generous amounts of Erguotou.

As for the old work units, I wasn't aware that they were being demolished nearly as quickly as the old hutongs, although judging from the one I lived in, it won't be long before they do that on their own.
posted by [expletive deleted] at 11:54 AM on June 11, 2007


Man, if you're going to try to do something like this, you should put some effort into the execution. This just sucks.
posted by mr_roboto at 11:57 AM on June 11, 2007


I can see my house on that!
posted by Abiezer at 12:59 PM on June 11, 2007


Sim City used to have trains, where have the trains gone? Also, there only seems to be one city in this online version.
posted by mattoxic at 1:04 PM on June 11, 2007 [1 favorite]


There was a great hutong behind the Swiss Hotel in Dongsi Shitiao that was slowly whittled down by high-rise office complexes bit by bit untill it's now about the size of half a city block. Someone tagged it with the message in Chinese, "A city becomes a tiny village."

The work units, even the old, beautiful ones down off the third ring are subject to the chai marks now too.

Part of the government plan in reassigning housing disbursements is to broadly split up old houtong and danwei groups to split up potential unrest. Playing on the communal culture, relocated families have to spend time readjusting with other outcasts rather than organizing for protests.
posted by Pollomacho at 1:13 PM on June 11, 2007


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