You got your Twitter API in my WordPress blog
December 12, 2009 6:55 PM   Subscribe

WordPress has added Twitter API support to hosted blogs. Now you can use Tweetie (or any other configurable Twitter client) to actually read blogs, instead of just getting links to them. The API integration is still undercooked, but is a reminder that there's a lot happening outside of 140 characters. APIs may be BizDev 2.0, but does that include work-alikes? (This isn't the first project to use the Twitter API as a lingua franca for micro-blogging.)
posted by ivey (10 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite
 
This is a really smart move for Automattic.
posted by signalnine at 7:14 PM on December 12, 2009


Twitter is so 00's.
posted by delmoi at 7:21 PM on December 12, 2009 [1 favorite]


Twitter is just an RSS feed aggregator for feeds with very, very short bits of content. Would love to see the concept of a "tweet" become more generic and less tied to the specific Twitter.com service.

Especially since, I feel, Twitter is not innovating very well at the moment. The new Retweet thing is kind of a mess, for example, and I would *love* to see enclosures of some sort so links/pics/vids/etc don't have to be tied to other services.
posted by chasing at 7:56 PM on December 12, 2009 [1 favorite]


What, you mean like Tumblr?
posted by dunkadunc at 8:24 PM on December 12, 2009 [1 favorite]


That's a surprisingly genius move.
posted by middleclasstool at 8:34 PM on December 12, 2009


I'm of two minds about this. On the one, I half-expected something like this to come along eventually (although I had no idea how - props to those who did). On the other, it's hard to tell who'll be ready to exploit this usefully outside of those who are both comfortable fiddling with technology and willing to spend time doing setup work. And I'd expect many of those already have syndication clients of some variety or another to do the aggregation and notification work.

Content syndication (and the idea that you can get website updates without having to revisit each website every morning) is still a pretty difficult concept to get across to people who aren't already somewhat familiar with how blog systems work, so if this manages to succeed where other attempts at integrating RSS/Atom/etc clients have failed, it'll be a breakthrough. It might also end up causing other problems, as users begin @replying to blogs from within Twitter.
posted by ardgedee at 8:50 PM on December 12, 2009


I'm of two minds about this. On the one, I half-expected something like this to come along eventually (although I had no idea how - props to those who did).

What's so novel about it? Wordpress already has it's own API and there are already iPhone clients out there for it.

Nothing is more tiresome then people reinventing the wheel and calling it progress. There are also standardized blog posting APIs like the Atom Publishing Protocol, there's google's oddly named pubsubhubbub system for broadcasting blog post updates, etc.

All this is doing is making it possible for people who use wordpress to use their twitter clients to update/read wordpress. But they could already use wordpress apps to do that. And most twitter clients aren't expecting to operate on multiple services, and aren't going to be setup to handle it properly.

--

Now what I'd like to see would be bittorent clients that use twitter to broadcast their IPs now that all the torrent trackers are getting shut down. Think about it, you could use hashtags to identify the torrent, and (if you wanted) encode the IP address using words from a dictionary, (and if you normalized by frequency, the generated sentences would look normal to a computer)

Then twitter might actually be worth caring about.
posted by delmoi at 9:13 PM on December 12, 2009 [1 favorite]


Why would they want encourage Wordpress blogs full of Twitter posts? It's bad enough that Twitter is full of Twitter posts.
posted by regicide is good for you at 9:26 PM on December 12, 2009 [2 favorites]


Now what I'd like to see would be bittorent clients that use twitter to broadcast their IPs now that all the torrent trackers are getting shut down.

Distributed trackers
posted by DU at 3:43 AM on December 13, 2009


> Nothing is more tiresome then people reinventing the wheel and calling it progress. There are also standardized blog posting APIs like the Atom Publishing Protocol, there's google's oddly named pubsubhubbub system for broadcasting blog post updates, etc.

Providing content syndication to people who do not understand content syndication -- through channels they're already familiar with -- is where the potential lies. I have to deal with people every day who have no clue what content syndication is, what content aggregation is, and what they're good for. Explaining this and justifying its existence to them is hard. Open content syndication standards have been around for a decade but its use among people who are not programmers and web developers is close to nil, at best. For the rest of the world, the steps you have to go through to get Wordpress.com into your Twitter feed are going to be more complex than the value proposition, but if they can be hustled through the initial effort managing their subscriptions will be a lot easier since the mechanisms will be similar to the methods of following and unfollowing that they're presumably already familiar with.

The geek-cred cleverness of Wordpress's latest hack, or lack of same, has nothing to do with its value. This is a concession (currently imperfect, but with potential) to the ninety-nine-point-something percent of the world who lack your comfort level around computer software.
posted by ardgedee at 6:22 AM on December 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


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