A visit to an orangutan forest school
July 18, 2010 3:50 PM   Subscribe

Raw video from a visit to an orangutan forest school in Borneo: part 1 2 3 4 posted by item (9 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
Where's the "ook" tag?

[this is good]
posted by Countess Elena at 3:52 PM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


I was hoping that someone had discovered that orangutans have their own schools out in the forest, with little orangutan kids in orangutan uniforms sitting at orangutan desks and giving shiny bananas to their orangutan teachers so they wouldn't get slapped across their orangutan hands with rulers.
posted by emilyd22222 at 3:54 PM on July 18, 2010


Had I known earlier I might have applied to Orangutan school instead of clown college.
posted by special-k at 3:55 PM on July 18, 2010 [2 favorites]


so much depends
upon
a red wheel
barrow
filled with orang
outangs
beside the wildlife
rehab.

okay I'll stop now
posted by Countess Elena at 3:56 PM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


That is a really depressingly huge number of orangutoddlers.
posted by Sys Rq at 4:07 PM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


The sad part is that they (both the Indonesians and Malaysians) are killing off the orangutan's natural habitat in order to plant palm trees everywhere. I flew into Tawau last year in order to go diving at Sipadan and during the entire two-hour drive from the airport to Semporna, there were nothing but palm tree plantations as far as the eye could see. No more forest, just palm trees. I can't even begin to tell you what the Indonesian side looks like. So yeah, now they gather the monkeys at a few centers to make it convenient for the gringos to visit.
posted by jsavimbi at 6:15 PM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


They are probably classified as wild animals but they also need care and protection. It is so sad to have this young orangutans since they are still toddlers. As what the research said, they usually stay beside their mother for about 2 to seven years. Since they are not yet ready to face their life, special care from human is needed.

It is great that they is a school or house for these species. Good Job!
posted by JohnD at 6:22 PM on July 18, 2010


It is great that they is a school or house for these species. Good Job!

I think you miss the point that there once were schools and homes for the orangutan in the forest, living amongst themselves but now they live off of the charity of humans.
posted by jsavimbi at 6:38 PM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


So yeah, now they gather the monkeys at a few centers to make it convenient for the gringos to visit.

I think you miss the point that there once were schools and homes for the orangutan in the forest, living amongst themselves but now they live off of the charity of humans.


And I think YOU miss the point of the forest schools. They're not established as tourist attractions - their purpose is to rescue and hopefully rehabilitate apes
that have been orphaned by poachers and the palm oil industry or were sold into the illegal pet trade. The visitors are reluctantly allowed in order to help finance the centers, which receive very few government funds as they're present in extremely poor economies. The ultimate goal is to release as many of the orangutans as possible back into the ever-shrinking wild. At most of the centers, visitors are not allowed any contact with the orangutans - I admit I'm not sure what the difference is with this one, but I'd guess the contact is allowed because of the nature of the work the "gringos" do.

Rewatch the four videos I posted. Count how many "gringos" you see. Here's a cheat: there's the woman who is the (human) focal point and then there's the gentleman holding the camera, and it's a tough call counting them as they belong to a conservation organization. No other gringos that I can see.

But I shouldn't have to tell you all this. After all, you've been diving in more or less the general area of the world, where you no doubt picked up a pretty broad knowledge base. Oh yeah, orangutans are apes, not monkeys.
posted by item at 9:43 PM on July 18, 2010


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