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Giving thanks with pumpkin juice and butterbeer.
November 17, 2011 10:35 AM   Subscribe

Great food ideas for a fantasy and sci-fi themed Thanksgiving features recipes from Inn at the Crossroads (medieval recipes/Game of Thrones), Harry Potter Recipes, and The Geeky Chef ("a collection of recipes inspired by books, movies, and video games").
posted by flex (34 comments total) 19 users marked this as a favorite

 
After all, in the Star Trek episode “Charlie X,” Captain Kirk is upset because he wants to celebrate Thanksgiving properly with a turkey, but there were none on board. Instead, the crew was going to have to eat meatloaf.

I'm ashamed to admit that not only didn't I remember that, it rings no bells. (And I'm ashamed to admit that I'm ashamed to admit I didn't have all the episodes memorized.)

But that's not why I quoted the paragraph. I really want to say: How can you be "out of" something when your food is supplied by a food synthesizer?

Oh and Inn at the Crossroads looks like an awesome site. I'm going to have to try that black bread.
posted by DU at 10:42 AM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I've had this! From grapes grown in my yard (when I was a kid). It's actually much better than "platonic concord grapes" because concord grapes are kind of gross to eat. Yummy, but when the skin comes off and you have a naked grape in your hand/mouth it looks/feels like an eyeball.
posted by DU at 10:46 AM on November 17, 2011


DU-I was down with the Black Bread until I saw the recipe there for Oatbread.

I also want to have all of these themed Thanksgivings. Every single one.
posted by miss-lapin at 10:47 AM on November 17, 2011


I assume in a Harry Potter thanksgiving all the adults dress as children then gobble down course after course of shit.
posted by biffa at 10:48 AM on November 17, 2011


Both breads went on my list. And candied orange(/lemon!) peel.

Not so much the locusts and snails, though.
posted by DU at 10:49 AM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


How can you be "out of" something when your food is supplied by a food synthesizer?

Well it was replicators in Star Trek but Charlie X is a very early espisode and I'm not sure they had all the details worked out of many of the things that are used later.
posted by biffa at 10:53 AM on November 17, 2011


I assume in a Harry Potter thanksgiving all the adults dress as children then gobble down course after course of shit.
what
posted by This, of course, alludes to you at 10:54 AM on November 17, 2011


PLOMEEK SOUP. THEY HAVE PLOMEEK SOUP. OMG.

I'm SO making that.
posted by zarq at 10:59 AM on November 17, 2011


The term "replicator" originated on Star Trek: The Next Generation, portrayed as a 24th century advancement from the 23rd century "food synthesizer" seen in Star Trek: The Original Series."
That said, you are probably right about them not having thought of how it works yet.
posted by DU at 11:06 AM on November 17, 2011


The link to the serenity cookbook under Mudder's Milk is defunct. If anyone is looking for the pdf, it's here.
posted by zarq at 11:09 AM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Is there klah? Klah is my favorite fictional beverage.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:10 AM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I had to look up klah. Pern!
posted by zarq at 11:18 AM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


To be clear, they do not celebrate Thanksgiving in the Harry Potter books because they are in Britain. This is not canon.
posted by elmer benson at 11:29 AM on November 17, 2011 [5 favorites]


As a Canadian, I feel it is my duty to provide the requisite "thanksgiving was last month!" comment. And so I have.

I kind of want to try to make Mudder's Milk, but it seems like too much effort: soak overnight? For a drink? God, I am way too lazy for that.
posted by asnider at 11:30 AM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


That George R. R. Martin makes such an effort with foods in ASoIaF and describes them in such detail is possibly the one little quirk of his writing I find most charming. Mind you, I don't always pay attention.
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich at 11:38 AM on November 17, 2011


i'm curious to see how they do the lamprey pie. because, well...
posted by fuzzypantalones at 11:41 AM on November 17, 2011


Chicken Fried Muggle.
posted by Burhanistan at 11:42 AM on November 17, 2011


The thing about the traditional American Thanksgiving meal is that IT IS SCIENCE FICTION FOOD!!!

You have a colony ship full of people who have to make an emergency landing because they were low on critical supplies and end up making a go of it with the help of indigenous beings who taught them to grow and prepare the alien flora and fauna that the survey teams described but which they had never seen before, much less eaten. Weird alien things like corn, tomatoes, potatoes, pumpkins and turkey. They were thankful not because it was a meal just like back home, but because it beat the shit out of dying of starvation!

Doing a medieval Thanksgiving dinner is like doing a surrealist Easter meal with glazed ham, deviled eggs and jello salad.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 12:09 PM on November 17, 2011 [9 favorites]


Last week I made the Beef and Bacon Pie from Inn at the Crossroads. There was some debate amongst my friends as to whether or not this would be disgusting, but I'm happy to report that it was fucking delicious.
posted by Parasite Unseen at 12:17 PM on November 17, 2011


Parasite Unseen: was just about the say that I had made that too... I made the "sweet" version; and there was something....odd about it.
Can't quite put my finger on; still quite tasty, and damn filling.
posted by ShawnString at 12:22 PM on November 17, 2011


Anyone for Soylent Turkey? Thursday can be Soylent turkey Day.
posted by Renoroc at 12:26 PM on November 17, 2011


Burhanistan: "Chicken Fried Muggle."

That's in the Death Eaters Cookbook
posted by zarq at 12:29 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Being that Harry Potter is English it doesn't make much sense to have a Harry Potter Thanksgiving. To the English the fourth Thursday in November is just the fourth Thursday in November.
posted by LoudMusic at 12:58 PM on November 17, 2011


Vastly incomplete without recipes from Redwall.
posted by Slap*Happy at 1:00 PM on November 17, 2011


So, you could probably actually ferment Mudder's milk.
posted by Gygesringtone at 1:03 PM on November 17, 2011


DU: The term "replicator" originated on Star Trek: The Next Generation, portrayed as a 24th century advancement from the 23rd century "food synthesizer" seen in Star Trek: The Original Series."

I am ashamed.
posted by biffa at 1:05 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


So, you could probably actually ferment Mudder's milk.

Jaaaayne! The man they call Jaaaaaayyyyne!
posted by zomg at 1:35 PM on November 17, 2011


My mudder was a mudder
posted by fusinski at 1:55 PM on November 17, 2011


Good to know, ShawnString, as I'd been planning to make the sweet version myself. I dig sweet fruit in savory recipes and I'll definitely still make it, but maybe not a double recipe like I was thinking of doing.
posted by pajamazon at 2:33 PM on November 17, 2011


So who's doing Breakfast in Mereen the authentic way, with meat from the source mentioned in the comments? Let me know so I can, uh, not stop by for dinner.
posted by pajamazon at 2:38 PM on November 17, 2011


Thanks for the links but I'm going to stick with the traditional Thanksgiving meal of pretzels, jelly beans, popcorn, and buttered toast.
posted by turaho at 3:02 PM on November 17, 2011


I tweeted the Inn at the Crossroads folks once (jokingly) asking if they were going to try the roast dog in honey from A Dance With Dragons., pajamazon. Alas, they were not.
posted by cmgonzalez at 4:42 PM on November 17, 2011


cute
posted by amykins at 3:45 PM on November 18, 2011


So. I tried both the candied lemon peel and the black bread and neither really came out well.
posted by DU at 4:53 AM on December 1, 2011


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