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Space Photography, explained
May 1, 2012 8:15 PM   Subscribe

Should you find yourself in orbit with a camera and spare time, here's a how-to.
posted by pjern (11 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite

 
1. My advice to women in space: cut your hair short!

2. I take my camera wherever I go, the sad part is there isn't anywhere I go that is as fascinating as space.

3. although, I guess I could get the same shots of space vehicles, just from the opposite perspective and I would need a longer lens.
posted by HuronBob at 8:34 PM on May 1, 2012


The first time I get into zero-g I'm going for the water balloons.
posted by twoleftfeet at 9:21 PM on May 1, 2012


Posing looks like an interesting problem for portraits, because gravity isn't there to mark particular poses as relaxed or natural. In the group shot it looks like they're positioning their arms in imitation of what would look relaxed if gravity were present, but its not quite convincing, their hair and clothing is floating around them. So try even harder to look like you're influenced by gravity, or try to come up with some space-specific poses that people won't find strange?
posted by Hither at 9:23 PM on May 1, 2012


Can I have a how-to on how to find myself in orbit?
I feel that would be useful considering I am neither a Russian Oiligarch, American Billionaire, nor member of a popular 1990s boy band.
And not of that rubbis Low Earth Orbit jazz.

More seriously, these are stunning. There Aurora Australis just replaced my old desktop.
posted by Mezentian at 9:24 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


The shot of "Rick working outside at night" looks like something from a Hollywood sci-fi thriller - repairing the ship before the aliens return. And who knew that legs are for carrying stuff?

Nice find, thanks for posting.
posted by Quietgal at 9:24 PM on May 1, 2012


So try even harder to look like you're influenced by gravity, or try to come up with some space-specific poses that people won't find strange?

Or perhaps find a way to embrace the strangeness?
posted by RobotHero at 9:40 PM on May 1, 2012


Related: Hasselbald's NASA Astronaut's Photography Manual (pdf).
posted by James Scott-Brown at 5:10 AM on May 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


This image does a decent job of capturing life in space.

I don't want to live in space yet.


And geez, learn how to resize with resampling, genius astronauts! Some of these pictures could be really cool if they weren't pixelated as hell.
posted by chundo at 6:54 AM on May 2, 2012


Understatement of the day: "Using reflected light from Earth as an illumination source is a technique that not many have been able to experience."
posted by rouftop at 10:51 AM on May 2, 2012


I think that this picture - Milky Way from Discovery Flight Deck is amazing because I'm so used to looking at all the colour-corrected/infrared/uv/gamma ray sensitive pictures of galaxies on the APOD, that it's amazing to see a "regular" camera pick up the Milky Way and it's blue! For reals! Also I hate the pictures of the crew because they're in space and weightless (I'm upside-down and it doesn't matter!) and doing cool stuff and I'm jealous.
posted by Zack_Replica at 12:41 PM on May 2, 2012


This is a really outstanding article. I like his writing style.

NASA generally puts high-res versions of their photos in the public domain, so I'm surprised they aren't linked from this article.
posted by scose at 5:22 PM on May 2, 2012


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