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better to hold the interest and attention of the class
October 18, 2012 2:18 PM   Subscribe


 
Interesting. all day today I was at Sturbridge Village (A Massachusetts living history museum set up like an 1840's village).
We spent a while in the school house writing on slates. I wonder if this is a talent he developed as a boy doodling while his school teacher recited tables.
posted by beccaj at 2:30 PM on October 18, 2012


Holy moley, these are righteous.
posted by Greg Nog at 2:31 PM on October 18, 2012


I wonder if this is a talent he developed as a boy doodling while his school teacher recited tables.

However he developed his technique, I think it's fair to say that as Director of Art at the Salem Normal School, he was most definitely investigating how a medium could be used to visually enhance the presentation of knowledge in the classroom, much as someone working today in Salem State University's School of Education might be looking into how to best make use of digital projectors and interactive graphics.
posted by RonButNotStupid at 3:14 PM on October 18, 2012 [1 favorite]


I love how the step by step instructions seem so easy to reproduce, except that the last step on each is basically "draw over the three or four strokes made in the previous steps to end up with beautifully detailed chalk artwork".
posted by OverlappingElvis at 3:34 PM on October 18, 2012 [2 favorites]


I mean, if I were trying to do any of these (except the trees, maybe?) I'll bet I could get as far as step three before quitting with a frustrated "oh, come on".
posted by OverlappingElvis at 3:38 PM on October 18, 2012


Those are amazing, thank you for posting them.
posted by LobsterMitten at 3:58 PM on October 18, 2012


Good golly moses, this fellow was a wizard with the chalk!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:04 PM on October 18, 2012


Wow, those are just amazing! I keep feeling like there must be some trick to this, and really the drawings are photographs, because they are just that good.
posted by misha at 5:41 PM on October 18, 2012


1) These remind me of learning how to draw with charcoal. And as a former teacher who had to use blackboards, I wish I had made that connection :P

2) A reminder than in the right hands with proper training, even old technology can be a powerful teaching tool.
posted by smirkette at 7:46 PM on October 18, 2012 [1 favorite]


I love how the step by step instructions seem so easy to reproduce, except that the last step on each is basically "draw over the three or four strokes made in the previous steps to end up with beautifully detailed chalk artwork".

I see that. It's the early 20th century version of How to Draw an Owl.
posted by Miko at 8:56 PM on October 18, 2012 [2 favorites]


I mean, if I were trying to do any of these (except the trees, maybe?) I'll bet I could get as far as step three before quitting with a frustrated "oh, come on".

Yup. You'd have a much easier time of it with a whiteboard.
posted by sebastienbailard at 9:58 PM on October 18, 2012


Part of me wishes that I could do this and then the other part of me thinks, well, if I managed to make something this great there is no way it would every get rubbed of the board... you want to teach maths? spelling? pfft, I drew a freakin' forest and it's staying!
posted by latch24 at 10:45 PM on October 18, 2012


I drew a freakin' forest and it's staying!

All glory is fleeting.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 1:51 AM on October 19, 2012


Wow, those are like magic.

As a kid in art class, I always felt a bit like it was cheating to use the tools to generate texture and detail - I wanted every mark to be deliberate and designed. I realise now that it's the same thing, I just wasn't skilled with the tools enough.
posted by lucidium at 5:26 AM on October 19, 2012 [1 favorite]


PLEASE LEAVE
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 7:51 AM on October 19, 2012


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