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Mediated Reality With Remote Expert
October 21, 2012 12:25 AM   Subscribe

"As a result, it creates a mediated reality environment, or what we call a visual filter, which is a proper superset of augmented reality." Realtime High Dynamic Range Imaging adapted for TIG Welding (video)

Abstract: HDRchitecture: Real-time Stereoscopic HDR Imaging for Extreme Dynamic Range (PDF)

Paper: Realtime HDR (High Dynamic Range) Video For Eyetap Wearable Computers, FPGA_Based Seeing Aids, And Glasses (Eyetaps) (PDF)
posted by the man of twists and turns (28 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite

 
This was part of SIGGRAPH 2012 'Emerging Technologies' exhibition. SIGGRAPH is 'the international conference and exhibition on computer graphics and interactive techniques.'
posted by the man of twists and turns at 12:29 AM on October 21, 2012


bet those would really come in handy in fighting exotic fires, oil rig blowouts, etc.. also the cops should wear them, just cause they'd scare the crap out of folks
posted by facetious at 12:54 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Amazing. That is simply one of the most stunning videos I have ever seen. In all my years I have never seen a jargon to English ratio quite so high. It is a very impressive feat. This research has produced an extreme dynamic range of jargon, which, as we know, is a proper superset of lingo. I can't wait to see how this progresses in the years to come.
posted by Ad hominem at 12:57 AM on October 21, 2012 [11 favorites]


For those who just have to know: TIG welding.
posted by benito.strauss at 12:58 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


I am pretty sure that is Steve Mann he is credited on the page, and listed in the bibliography, but I'm not 100% sure that is him behind the mask. The video shows them welding a hydraulophone which was also invented by Mann.

Not much to say about him, except he is certainly a trailblazer.
posted by Ad hominem at 1:18 AM on October 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


And here we see it putting the lotion in the basket.
posted by hal9k at 1:51 AM on October 21, 2012


In all my years I have never seen a jargon to English ratio quite so high

Well then... allow me to fix that
posted by revmitcz at 2:06 AM on October 21, 2012 [7 favorites]


Oh, lord. It's Mad-Eye Manny.
posted by Joe in Australia at 2:23 AM on October 21, 2012


In all my years I have never seen a jargon to English ratio quite so high

Well then... allow me to fix that


There is a difference between those two - the Rockwell video is a parody of overly-technical sales videos - the presenter is deliberately talking nonsense. The HDR video is the real thing (i.e. jargon-riddled presentation).
posted by YAMWAK at 2:39 AM on October 21, 2012


Yay, another perfectly simple, cheap and user-fixable solution made complicated, expensive and disposable by the addition of computers!
posted by DU at 3:37 AM on October 21, 2012


made complicated, expensive and disposable by the addition of computers

Huh? I am no expert, but my understanding is that TIG welding is really fucking difficult, and even what looks like correct work is not always sound. This new tech allows you to actually see what you are doing, and provides feedback on how to improve the weld in real time. Sounds like a useful application.
posted by Meatbomb at 3:44 AM on October 21, 2012 [11 favorites]


Yay, another perfectly simple, cheap and user-fixable solution made complicated, expensive and disposable by the addition of computers!

Yay, another snarky commenter who doesn't see the value of research!
posted by victory_laser at 3:45 AM on October 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


I see what you're saying DU and I respect that sentiment. This particular tool might not actually be that useful, but I think work like this is probably another stone in the road towards some cool shit.
posted by victory_laser at 3:51 AM on October 21, 2012


Better teaching tool for TIG welding - I think that's great. When you can't clearly see what you're doing, it's hard to get feedback you can learn from.

As for the future, how about driving glasses that eliminate glare? If the time-delay is sufficiently low, it could be possible. That would save lives, and it could be a better solution than we have now, computer aided or not.
posted by YAMWAK at 4:01 AM on October 21, 2012


I would have given anything for something like this when I was trying to learn stick/smaw welding. I think it'll make a huge impact in both increasing hand-weld quality and flattening the learning curve.
posted by klarck at 4:31 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


For a second, I thought this post was a double - until I realized that, no, in fact, there was simply another post, about a year ago, featuring technology demonstrated at SIGGRAPH, that involved real-time HDR video capture at HD resolution, that showcased TIG welding, done by a completely different team!
posted by kcds at 4:55 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


So hipster welding is a thing now
posted by fallingbadgers at 5:10 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yeah, but you want to make sure you start with a stringer bead attaching their faces.
posted by laconic skeuomorph at 5:25 AM on October 21, 2012


If you've never spent hours behind the dark green lens of a welding shield staring at a bright white dot you'd probably not understand why this is so fucking sweet. TIG welding today generally looks like this from the welder's perspective. I'd love to be able to use this for learning new welding techniques and processes. I'd use it all the time if it gets small enough to fit in the same space as a standard lens. They have solar-powered auto-darkening lenses now and would have been a sci-fi stuff 40 years ago.

A welding shield that could give the heads-up display of the intended weld direction and speed would be a great way to speed up the learning process for any kind of welding.

Personally I dunno if I'd want to be wearing a helmet that records everything I do but I guess it'd be easy enough to just take it off.

Another thing I think would be neat would be to use the MIT hand-held cnc tech mentioned in another thread with a welder or even a cutting torch.
posted by glip at 6:22 AM on October 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


In all my years I have never seen a jargon to English ratio quite so high.

I don't know much about welding or HDR photography, but the video was understandable, and I didn't notice any unnecessary jargon. They define a new term, "quantigraphic camera", but they explain it clearly.

A few things are assumed the viewer already knows: HDR photography merges multiple exposures to show both bright and dark parts of the image. Welding makes an extremely bright light. PCs have very fast processors on their video cards called GPUs.
posted by jjj606 at 8:19 AM on October 21, 2012


Looks like we're well on the road to a wide-spectrum VISOR.
posted by spiderskull at 8:36 AM on October 21, 2012


Luke, let me see you with my own eyes...
posted by double block and bleed at 8:45 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Seriously, this is really cool. I never became a good welder because I couldn't see what I was doing. It takes a lot of practice to look at something and then work on it using mostly the memory of what it looked like and feel. That's why certified welders are among the highest paid workers of the trades.
posted by double block and bleed at 8:51 AM on October 21, 2012


It's not so much about the potential of this specific piece of technology, although this would be amazing for firefighting and delicate rescue or cleanup operations. Augmented reality may be the ultimate killer app, and it's good to see more than just concept art and pipe dreams for once.

Everyone from surgeons to truck drivers could benefit from the filtering effects or the visual overlay of information. Hell, imagine how much easier it would be to play "Hungarian Rhapsody" if the proper keys lit up for you, or being able to cook the perfect soufflé after being given real-time tips and instructions. Imagine having an artificial synesthesia that allows you to visualize smells and detect sources of harmful chemicals or environmental hazards. I'm definitely overreaching here, but you know you're on to something when you start to turn science fiction into plain ol' science.
posted by Johann Georg Faust at 11:00 AM on October 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yay, another perfectly simple, cheap and user-fixable solution made complicated, expensive and disposable by the addition of computers!

So yea, saying that this is a waste because... computers, I guess... is pretty asinine. It's like saying "Why would you design and build a special camera to record the Aurora Borealis when a point and shoot pocket special is at hand? Or better yet, just go and see them yourself instead of recording/studying them [accurately] later." Or telescopes or, worst of all I suppose, computer assisted telescopes! The humanity of it...

TIG welding is really fucking difficult, and even what looks like correct work is not always sound. This new tech allows you to actually see what you are doing, and provides feedback on how to improve the weld in real time. Sounds like a useful application.

Right on. I can MIG, but even learning how to get halfway decent welds with a MIG welder is tough because, even with a good/great hood, you're basically Thor wielding molten iron in realtime and everything that can go wrong will go wrong and it's not always possible to back up and fix something without a whole lot of PITA factor. TIG is similar in that it's harder but can be used on stuff like stainless or other alloys that you probably wouldn't want to MIG.

Good on this guy for working up a training/teaching tool that seems to also make him look like something out of the Fallout series.
posted by RolandOfEld at 6:08 PM on October 21, 2012


> Hell, imagine how much easier it would be to play "Hungarian Rhapsody" if the proper keys lit up for you, or being able to cook the perfect soufflé after being given real-time tips and instructions.

Seriously? If you're going to do it like that, why bother playing the piano at all, just have the computer play it for you ... I for one would get no satisfaction out of doing things this way.
posted by crazy_yeti at 6:11 PM on October 21, 2012


crazy_yeti: "> Hell, imagine how much easier it would be to play "Hungarian Rhapsody" if the proper keys lit up for you, or being able to cook the perfect soufflé after being given real-time tips and instructions.

Seriously? If you're going to do it like that, why bother playing the piano at all, just have the computer play it for you ... I for one would get no satisfaction out of doing things this way.
"

see, the deal is to make 'training yourself to do it' easier. not necessarily to have a machine that can do it, or to take the difficulty out of the activity itself.

we already have machines that can weld stuff.
posted by ArgentCorvid at 8:05 PM on October 21, 2012


The most basic way of learning any new skill is to do it slowly. Unfortunately, this isn't always an option. Time-critical, highly dynamic processes like welding, glass blowing, cooking, or driving a manual car just can't be slowed down, or they don't work. So learning them is damn hard. Augmented reality apps like the welding one shown correcting the tip height and rate of weld would be invaluable for quickly teaching those tricky skills that are so often helpfully described as "You just gotta get a feel for it!". After you do it correctly a few times assisted, you'll get that "feel", without the weeks of frustrating failure.
posted by CaseyB at 9:07 PM on October 21, 2012


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