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Don't Forget it Jake, it’s Pie-Town.
November 17, 2013 2:32 PM   Subscribe

Pie-Town was held today (in Chicago) with America’s Baking Competition finalist Francine Bryson and her (no kidding) Chocolate Peanut Butter Bacon Pie! And with National Pie-Day coming up in January, again, you'll be all ready for the Great American Pie Festival next April with the National Pie Championships in Florida. Or stay at home and try out the winning recipes from last year (mostly non-bacon, non chocolate, non-peanut butter fruit pies, but still...Pie!)
posted by Smedleyman (24 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
In Florida? What does Florida know about pies? Pie championships should be held in the Northeast or Midwest where pie is a supplementary religion.
posted by GenjiandProust at 2:47 PM on November 17, 2013


What does Florida know about pies?

Pecan, mostly. Oh, and Key lime.
posted by Sys Rq at 3:24 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


In my circles, National Pie-Day is March 14th celebrated at 1:59 PM. Our international colleagues celebrate it on the 22nd of July.
posted by persona at 3:26 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


> finalist Francine Bryson and her (no kidding) Chocolate Peanut Butter Bacon Pie!

Aren't we finally past the stage of expressing surprise that bacon works well in certain kinds of sweets?

Breaking it down for a moment: You have chocolate, peanut, salt, pork, and smoke flavors...We're not talking orange juice and toothpaste, people. The only real difference between two otherwise-equal chocolate peanut butter pies is that the one with bacon will be smokier, richer, and have little chewy bits of damn fucking wonderment in it, bits which will have absorbed some of the sugar in the pie and released a lot of rich salty, smoky oil into the pie filling.

*(Please note: Pineapple and ham pizza is an abomination. However, many millions of people like it. They're wrong, but they've helped ensure pineapple and ham pizzas are neither unusual nor strange, and the point I am trying to make is that sweet pig flesh is not an unusual, strange thing.)
posted by ardgedee at 3:28 PM on November 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


In my circles,

I secant what you did there.
posted by GenjiandProust at 3:57 PM on November 17, 2013


Serious Question : why are traditional American pies virtually all sweet and fruit-based ( I question whether chicken pot pie is really a pie) whereas British and Australian/NZ pies are mostly savory and meat&veg based? I'm not sure about Canada - I think it may be somewhere in the middle.
posted by Bwithh at 4:09 PM on November 17, 2013


I think the pizza (and it's weird step-child the calzone) long ago eclipsed the savory pie in the USA. Although I occasionally find a pasty shop in a city I am visiting.
posted by GenjiandProust at 4:12 PM on November 17, 2013


I'm not sure about Canada - I think it may be somewhere in the middle.

Nope. Sweet. We don't have meat pies at all really, but we do have pot pies (as does, I assume the US) which is basically just a pie full of soup. Even that's pretty uncommon, though.
posted by Sys Rq at 4:17 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


If it's sweet, and it doesn't have fruit IT ISN'T PIE.
posted by aspo at 4:32 PM on November 17, 2013


Nope. Sweet. We don't have meat pies at all really, but we do have pot pies
a Canadian I know has been recently excitedly posting photos of an Anglo-style meat pie shop in Canada to their Facebook so I was wondering about that... maybe the excitement was for the novelty of it though.

I object to North American pot pies being pies on on the major ground of soupiness and the secondary ground that they often only use an edible pie crust for the "lid" only (the rest is just a inedible metal/plastic bowl).
posted by Bwithh at 4:57 PM on November 17, 2013


I see Pie-town and I think HGTV.

Yes, I do like me some real estate porn.
posted by IndigoJones at 4:59 PM on November 17, 2013


If it's sweet, and it doesn't have fruit IT ISN'T PIE.
posted by aspo at 4:32 PM on November 17 [+] [!]


America and Britain are two nations divided by a common love of pie
posted by Bwithh at 4:59 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ardeegee: if you think Hawaiian Pizza is an abomination you're coming from such an alien culinary universe that any other opinion you might express is basically meaningless to me. However, as delicious as that and deli ham and sugar cured ham are I don't want any of them for dessert.

Second, while chocolate may have smoke flavors in it I don't want smoky-bacon level smoke flavors in my dessert.

Third, bacon is meat. I really am not too keen on significant amounts of beef, chicken, seafood, or pork in my dessert.

Award or no, my universe doesn't need any bacon in pies, thank you very much.
posted by Reverend John at 5:03 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


The go-to place for meat pies in the U.S. is central Louisiana, specifically Natchitoches. Bonus points for anyone who pronounces it properly.
posted by TedW at 5:15 PM on November 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


No, Pie Day should be held in Pie Town. (Disclaimer: I knew Russell Lee)
posted by jim in austin at 5:24 PM on November 17, 2013


Natchitoches. Rhymes with acidosis?
posted by bz at 5:24 PM on November 17, 2013


Nope. Sweet. We don't have meat pies at all really...
Is tourtiere not a pie?
posted by islander at 7:33 PM on November 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


The go-to place for meat pies in the U.S. is central Louisiana, specifically Natchitoches

Cool, that counts - it appears to be in the Latin empanada tradition. But I wonder what happened to Anglo- savory meat pie tradition in the US? Why did it get completely swamped by sweet fruit pies? Was it like the switch to coffee? Part of the cultural declaration of independence from Britain?
posted by Bwithh at 8:35 PM on November 17, 2013


The go-to place for meat pies in the U.S. is central Louisiana

This is reminding me that the Hubig's pies factory in New Orleans burned down last year. I only found out today, a day that I am actually in New Orleans. :(
posted by Pruitt-Igoe at 1:27 AM on November 18, 2013


IIRC there was a certain amount of panicked hoarding. I wonder if any are still uneaten.
posted by elizardbits at 5:50 AM on November 18, 2013


I would think that the extreme humidity of Florida would ruin many pies. Shoo-fly pie would just absorb water and become a soggy mess. And good shoo-fly pie in Pennsylvania Dutch Country is a wonder.
posted by X-Himy at 6:25 AM on November 18, 2013


Is tourtiere not a pie?

Sure, but so is seal flipper pie. Tourtière is regional cuisine, not (at all) national.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:49 AM on November 18, 2013


Canada has many savory pies: tourtiere, rappy pie, quiches, potato pies, fish pies, and variants of Brit originals like Cornish pasties. I can buy most of these at my local supermarket deli section. To say these are regional rather than national is to ignore the fact that most Brit pies are also regionally-based. If the poster was trying to say that there is no steak-and-kidney pie in Canada, he/she is also mistaken. Game pies are difficult to come by, but no more so here than Britain, I should think. (Unless, in either country, you know a hunter who is willing to share.) /derail

That pie that won the US contest, though... Dependent on canned milk (not unusual but not prize-worthy, either). Microwaved bacon? And some chemical concoction called "vanilla butter nut flavor". Nothing wrong with combining bacon, peanut butter, and chocolate, but this pie sounds disgusting.
posted by CCBC at 2:52 PM on November 18, 2013


Natchitoches. Rhymes with acidosis?
posted by bz at 8:24 PM on November 17 [+] [!]


No, but there's a town in Texas that comes close.
posted by TedW at 3:55 PM on November 18, 2013


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