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April 19, 2003 6:08 AM   Subscribe

Howard Dean writes about the Bush doctrine (and more) for Common Dreams.

"I am what is commonly referred to as a social liberal and a fiscal conservative."

In other words, he's not only about the war, it's the economy stupid.
posted by CrazyJub (17 comments total)

 
God, I've got such a political boner for that guy.
posted by Phatbank at 9:09 AM on April 19, 2003


Op-Ed WarFilter.

Still an interesting article though.
posted by Mark Doner at 9:47 AM on April 19, 2003


Oh no. A Common Dreams link by Howard Dean? Hoi polloi are going to scream bloody murder. Can I get the requisite DeanFilter comment out of the way?
posted by UrbanFigaro at 9:53 AM on April 19, 2003


"He divides us by class by rewarding his campaign donors with enormous tax cuts while the rest of us are deprived of affordable health care, prescription drugs for our seniors, and good schools for our kids. He divides us by gender by seeking to restrict reproductive choice for women. He divides us by sexual orientation by appointing reactionary judges to the bench, and as he did in Texas by refusing to sign the Hate Crimes bill if it included gay or lesbian Americans as potential victims."
At least one paragraph was related to domestic issues. It'll be great when the media (and thus the candidates) can talk about more than just the war. Apparently Bush was supposed to talk about his economic policy this week. Have you heard anything about a "policy" besides the tax cut? His speech got a lot of cheers at a Boeing plant in St. Louis this week. I wonder if the laid off Boeing employees are cheering? All about the Straight Talk.

Sorry, I got caught up in the moment. I like Dean too.
posted by jdb at 11:08 AM on April 19, 2003


Draft Clark.
posted by homunculus at 11:36 AM on April 19, 2003


"I am what is commonly referred to as a social liberal and a fiscal conservative."

So, Dean likes entitlements, but doesn't think anyone should have to pay for them?

Sounds just like everyone else.
posted by trharlan at 2:18 PM on April 19, 2003


I have to agree on the excitement for howard dean since i first saw him here. Unfortunately i don't think he's ever going to get real national coverage...but then again Clinton came out of arkansas so who knows

...not to say i have good taste as i'm also excited to see this
posted by NGnerd at 3:05 PM on April 19, 2003


From one who has observed Dean as Governor -- I have a great deal of respect for him. His views are balanced, he is humanistic and proactive, and he THINKS.
posted by vers at 5:11 PM on April 19, 2003


His views are balanced, he is humanistic and proactive, and he THINKS.

I'm not sure this benefits him in the dnc star-maker machinery.
posted by victors at 5:28 PM on April 19, 2003


Victors, I am not at all certain those attributes benefit him on the widescreen (though they should -- the Jimmy Stewart, indeed), but they could very well benefit us... if he can pacify the lions at the gate. It is not as though the man lacks personality, charm, will, or influence, so there is the chance he may pass if he is forgiven for having principles as well. Also, in an almost unprecendented way, the public has a chance at making it more likely.
posted by vers at 6:14 PM on April 19, 2003


from common dreams:

Editors Note: We are experiencing extremely high traffic which is slowing our website. Our 'E-Mail Article to a Friend' feature is temporarily down.
posted by Slagman at 6:53 PM on April 19, 2003


I am what is commonly referred to as a social liberal and a fiscal conservative."

So, Dean likes entitlements, but doesn't think anyone should have to pay for them?



trharlan: It probably means he won't spend 70 billion on a war, other untold billions on a military occupation of a foreign country while simultaneously cutting funding for social infrastructure to the bone.
posted by sic at 3:20 AM on April 20, 2003


It looks like Dean's chances of getting the nomination are pretty slim. Interestingly, it seems that the longer Hillary Clinton keeps out of the race, the more people out there would like to see her get the nomination.

But as thing stand now , there's no way America will elect a Democrat.

From where I'm standing (the other side of the Atlantic), the Democrats seem greatly inadequate at the opposition thing. It's amazing to see how the Bush administration succeeded in labeling any objections to their war or indeed any of their schemes "unpatriottic" and/or "irresponsible". And on budget, Dean is already trying to defend himself against "tax and spend" allegations, while the Democrats should be on the attack on this issue: aren't they the only ones who balanced the budget in the last twenty years (= three Rep. presidents, 1 Dem.!), with this administration trying to out-deficit even Ronald Reagan? Why can't they get that message across?
posted by NekulturnY at 5:05 AM on April 20, 2003


but then again Clinton came out of arkansas so who knows

OK, but is Dean going to execute a brain-damaged man just to exorcise the ghost of campaigns past?
posted by matteo at 2:15 PM on April 20, 2003


From where I'm standing (the other side of the Atlantic), the Democrats seem greatly inadequate at the opposition thing.

Just wait. The primaries start in nine months and the general election is in 19 months. The Democrats will be up to the task.

Dean already has a retort to the "tax-and-spend" label. He calls Republicans "borrow-and-spend." With personal bankruptcies at an all-time high in the United States, the phrase "borrow-and-spend" will resonate.

The Democrats can use another potent campaign slogan, one I spotted a few weeks ago on a bumper sticker: "Another Bush, another recession."

The Democrats will make a stronger challenge than you think. Bush got fewer votes than the Democrat in 2000, and the same thing is likely to happen in 2004.
posted by Holden at 8:01 AM on April 21, 2003


Why is that likely to happen? From all the polls I follow, the opposite seems true.

And a tough primary is likely to divide the Democrats internally, whereas Bush will probably have no competition for the GOP nomination. It's not like he'll be flanked from the right or anything.
posted by NekulturnY at 9:05 AM on April 21, 2003



whereas Bush will probably have no competition for the GOP nomination.

Has a sitting president ever had a serious challenge for the nomination from his own party?
posted by hari at 9:19 AM on April 21, 2003


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