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BBC on broadband
August 28, 2005 3:44 AM   Subscribe

The BBC announces plans to make its TV channels available on the internet. As you already know, you can already listen to all BBC radio channels live and view news clips and some news programmes. Now the BBC has ambitions to expand its internet offer even further. Starting next year, on demand radio and tv content will be available through MyBBCPlayer, with the past seven days of programmes, along with live streaming of BBC tv channels (apparently to be restricted to UK viewers only) and access to the archives. Plans also include the ability to purchase music downloads.
posted by funambulist (26 comments total)

 
There should be a BBC internet licence (£50.00 or so) so people from all over the world can join in. I'm not happy spending my £100.00 quid a year so that the whole world can get for free what I pay for, but if they chipped something in, that'd be cool.

I also wonder how easy it would be to set up some sort of proxy to bypass this restriction. I don't think it'd be that hard.
posted by seanyboy at 3:56 AM on August 28, 2005


I'd be happy to pay too - particularly to listen to the footie. I think there are proxies out there for radio, I just can't remember how to get around them (hint, hint)
posted by Sk4n at 4:10 AM on August 28, 2005


seanyboy: I'm not happy spending my £100.00 quid a year so that the whole world can get for free what I pay for, but if they chipped something in, that'd be cool.

You did read this bit, right:
"A BBC spokesman said the corporation was aiming to simulcast a channel permanently but would restrict it to UK viewers only."

Now, if you are talking about what is already available on the beeb website, fine - but thats ever so slightly off-topic, as this news is about future plans, innit? Plus, as I understand it, much of bbc material is already uk restricted. Which in fact goes somewhat against innernet ethos anyway. I don't want to have CNN or der speigel or news.com.au restricted to natives.
posted by dash_slot- at 5:04 AM on August 28, 2005


I think there are proxies out there for radio, I just can't remember how to get around them (hint, hint)
There was an ask-me question on that about a week ago.
posted by chill at 5:42 AM on August 28, 2005


There was an AskMe question recently about streaming football outside of the UK. I love the beeb.
posted by peacay at 5:43 AM on August 28, 2005


Now, if you are talking about what is already available on the beeb website, fine...

Not fine! UK residents can access BBC's web content and radio services for free: you don't need a license. It's only the TV you need a license for. Therefore there's no argument on grounds of fairness for charging the international audience for the BBC's web content. If they expand the online TV to an international audience it's a different story.

Fingers crossed this all involves making TV and radio broadcasts available as DRM-free high quality downloads.
posted by nthdegx at 5:52 AM on August 28, 2005


The BBC is a great PR tool for you guys. It spreads a positive image of your culture and attitudes to the world.

Don't think you aren't getting anything back by sharing it for free, goodwill is priceless.
posted by furiousxgeorge at 6:00 AM on August 28, 2005


So if Auntie starts putting TV programmes on the net, ditch your TV. Simple. You can watch your DVDs on your computer too so hoorah, you've got no reason to keep your TV anymore. Well, OK, Channel 4... but they'll clearly follow suit at some point.
posted by Decani at 6:11 AM on August 28, 2005


The BBC is a great PR tool for you guys. It spreads a positive image of your culture and attitudes to the world.
The problem is, prevailing opinion in the UK is dictated by what the newspapers want you to believe. They (e.g. Murdoch) have a vested interested in privatising the BBC and so arguments such as this (which I agree with) are lost in favour of berating it for not appealing to the lowest common demoninator.
posted by chill at 6:18 AM on August 28, 2005


There are several BBC programs I'd love to be able to watch here in the States. I'm not sure what I'd be willing to pay to be able access the programming block, but I would consider paying a fee. BBC America never seems to broadcast the BBC programs I'm itching to see.
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 6:36 AM on August 28, 2005


Ohmygodohmygodohmygod that means DOCTOR WHO!! Yay!
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 6:54 AM on August 28, 2005


We'll get the new Who in the states sooner or later; maybe only on DVD, but we'll get it. It's the stuff Slack-a-go-go alludes to that I'd love this for: no one is ever going to pick up the Mark Steel Lectures over here, for instance. True, there's other ways to get this stuff online, but something VOD from the Beeb itself would allow one to sample and explore a little easier. The international rights issues are probably impossible to resolve at this time though, so I guess I better start boning up on proxy tricks and the like.
posted by PinkStainlessTail at 7:02 AM on August 28, 2005


dash_slot- I understood completely that any streaming would be for UK addresses only. I just think that the programming should be opened up to the rest of the world for a subscription fee.
posted by seanyboy at 8:28 AM on August 28, 2005


Sounds neat. I trust linux/BSD/MacOS-compatible clients will be available? :)
posted by kaemaril at 9:08 AM on August 28, 2005


PinkStainlessTail writes "We'll get the new Who in the states sooner or later;"

If your in transmitter range of Canada you can get the new Who on the CBC.
posted by Mitheral at 9:13 AM on August 28, 2005


I'm only marginally interested in current BBC content. But I'm DEEPLY interested in stuff from the archives, especially old radio dramas. But I live in the US. Does anyone know if they're planning to limit the archives to UK-access only? I would GLADLY pay for this. I might even have to move to the UK if that's the only way I can get it.
posted by grumblebee at 9:15 AM on August 28, 2005


If you're in transmitter range of Canada you can get the new Who on the CBC.

I am, but with a pretty weak signal unfortunately. My PC on the other hand, seems to be able to pick up the show all the way from the UK, though there's a bit of a delay from the time it's actually broadcast for some reason...
posted by PinkStainlessTail at 9:19 AM on August 28, 2005


Mitheral - I get CBC on cable, I sort of assumed everybody did. I guess it must be because I'm in Washington.

As a Brit living in the US I was overjoyed to find than I'd be able to see Dr Who there, and slightly miffed that I'd laid out extra for BBC AMerica and that it hadn't delivered the goods.

By the way, WTF is with all the Benny Hill on BBC America? It's like a nightmare form my childhood or something. Do Americans actually think it's good?
posted by Artw at 10:33 AM on August 28, 2005


Actually, I wanted to write an open letter to the BBC propositng that they do the following:

1) Create a mixed streaming and P2P (BitTorrent like) client for their content.
2) Charge an internet fee for the streaming part
3) But even the streamer upload bits to the freeloaders as

Numerous reasons for this:
a) its good for the internet for home users to upload, as it helps keep upload costs down and prevent upload quotas.
b) saves the BBC money
c) saves third world countries money
d) creates a model for non-mainstream internet broadcasters who lack resources
etc.
posted by jeffburdges at 10:56 AM on August 28, 2005


Yes, please do this. I've emigrated from the UK recently, and I miss the beeb, largely for the news and the sporadically brilliant comedy series. I think I might be missing the "sequel" to The Office right now. Bugger.
posted by Jon Mitchell at 11:50 AM on August 28, 2005


this calls for the Royal Doulton with hand-painted periwinkles.
posted by clavdivs at 12:16 PM on August 28, 2005


Ricky Gervais - Extras.
(previous longer comment eaten by Jrun.)
posted by dash_slot- at 3:35 PM on August 28, 2005


By the way, WTF is with all the Benny Hill on BBC America? It's like a nightmare form my childhood or something. Do Americans actually think it's good?

Pathetic isn't it. Benny Hill wasn't even a BBC program. And about all PBS can get anymore is "Keeping up Appearances", which is a dated, one-joke series about middle class snobbery, a UK stereotype which doesn't travel. Thus its one joke is not even detectable by Americans. I can't imagine who watches it.
posted by George_Spiggott at 6:30 PM on August 28, 2005


Benny Hill wasn't even a BBC program.

Well, neither was Father Ted, but I'm quite glad they showed that.
posted by PinkStainlessTail at 7:54 PM on August 28, 2005


BBC World has been online for some time now.
posted by calwatch at 9:31 PM on August 28, 2005


Thus its one joke is not even detectable by Americans. I can't imagine who watches it.

this calls for the Royal Doulton with hand-painted periwinkles.
posted by clavdivs at 12:16 PM PST on August 28 [!]

oh George.
posted by clavdivs at 4:06 PM on August 29, 2005


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