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July 1, 2006 8:20 PM   Subscribe

The Information Machine, [YouTube]. This short animated film was written, produced and directed by Charles and Ray Eames for the IBM Pavillion at the 1958 Brussels World's Fair [embedded sound]. Animation by Dolores Cannata. The topic is the computer in the context of human development.
posted by nickyskye (7 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
Pretty cool little film. It almost convinced me that this computer thing might catch on. Nice soundtrack by Elmer Bernstein too. Thanks for the post.
posted by octothorpe at 8:39 PM on July 1, 2006


This is very cool. I enjoy the equating of speculators and future predicters as artists. Great music also, and a nice upbeat ending. Ah, information, surely you will save us from ourselves.

But why not link to the archive.org version (available in mpeg 2 & 4).
posted by MetaMonkey at 9:08 PM on July 1, 2006


Cute. I liked the Flickr-like windowing interface around 3 minutes in -- even though it was just an illustrative analogy. How could they have known?

And the THINK signs (an IBM slogan).
posted by dhartung at 9:23 PM on July 1, 2006


Good film. Interesting how much they focus on simulations. I wonder if people thought that would be the main use for computers?
posted by Afroblanco at 10:20 PM on July 1, 2006


I wonder if people thought that would be the main use for computers?

If you measure in cpu-cycles spent, it might be.
posted by spazzm at 10:39 PM on July 1, 2006


The voice over sounded familiar. Does anyone know who it was?
posted by Cranberry at 12:10 AM on July 2, 2006


Cranberry, Your question prompted me to Google 1958 voiceover narrators and the only one I could find that might fit the bill is Paul Frees, but I'm not sure. I really like the voice over of The Information Machine and wish I knew who it was.

dhartung, When I was a kid it was possible to pick up those THINK signs for free from the IBM building here in NYC. I have one on my desk now. Always liked that sign.

posted by nickyskye at 6:22 AM on July 2, 2006


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