Skip

savoring the everyday
April 7, 2007 6:37 PM   Subscribe

Ukiyo-e, a collection of dreamy, mostly charming, flash animations of Edo period Japanese paintings. Pictures of the floating world (everyday life) by Hokusai, Hiroshige, Utamaro. Encyclopedic list of floating world images on the web. Hokusai sketches in flash. [related]
posted by nickyskye (23 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite

 
I've been fascinated with Ukiyo-e for years so I appreciate this post. I've got print books of Hojusai and Hiroshige that are awesome to flip through. Very relaxing.
posted by puke & cry at 6:48 PM on April 7, 2007 [1 favorite]


great post. i've always liked that era.
posted by willie11 at 6:58 PM on April 7, 2007


That's a great link. Hokusai's 24 views of Fuji has always been one of my favorite collections.
posted by Pan Agan at 7:07 PM on April 7, 2007


My understanding is that Ukiyo refers to the culture that arose around the red-light districts of Edo-era Japan. One history I read indicated that there was a connection between the persecuted Christian minority and the beginnings of the artform, specifically the mass-production aspect. But the artform didn't really take off until it was tied to the theatre, nightlife, and geishas in Edo.
posted by lekvar at 7:11 PM on April 7, 2007


Also worth mentioning is Masami Teraoka's earlier works.

And... erm... shunga .[NSFW]

Oh, and before I get carried away, great post nickyskye!
posted by lekvar at 7:21 PM on April 7, 2007


Sugoi desu ne!
posted by vito90 at 7:45 PM on April 7, 2007


That's lovely. The art style seems oddly appropriate for flash, and the initial building of the scene reminds me of Twin Kingdom Valley.

Also: OMG Furries!.
posted by Artw at 8:09 PM on April 7, 2007




Hokusai's 24 views of Fuji has always been one of my favorite collections.

Hokusai did 36 views. Hiroshige did 36 as well. I believe the 24 number comes from a connection with a novella by Roger Zelazny. Or both numbers are divisible by 12.
posted by y2karl at 8:51 PM on April 7, 2007


Thanks for the post, nickskye. That "Guide to the Ukiyo-e Sites of the Internet" is very handy.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 9:11 PM on April 7, 2007


what levkar said, basically. If I had a better liberal arts education I would know the fancy French terms that most closely represents the uki-yo idea. . . "bourgeoisie milleu" comes to mind.
posted by Heywood Mogroot at 9:19 PM on April 7, 2007


as always, thanks nicky.
posted by shoepal at 11:06 PM on April 7, 2007


Hokusai's series was indeed called "Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji" but there were actually 46 prints in the series.
posted by typewriter at 5:15 AM on April 8, 2007


If you're interested in this style of painting, you should also check out the Kenji Mizoguchi film, Utamaro and His Five Women.
posted by jonp72 at 8:51 AM on April 8, 2007


Oh YAYY, pleased you all were pleased. :) Chocolate Cadbury eggs all around. Happy Easter from this non-theist in NYC.

Wonderful additional links! Thanks all for making this a rich thread.

Just wanted to share those likeable flash animations and ended up doing more research on the subject than expected to make a presentable post. And then I learned so much more from your comments.

The term, "floating world" appealed to my sense of the world in change, in flux. I like the warm vulgarity depicted in some of the paintings of simply being human, a person sleeping with the bedclothes half kicked off.

Apparently, the word ukiyo-e also is a homophone meaning Sorrowful World," the earthly plane of death and rebirth from which Buddhists sought release". Perhaps it's like the Sanskrit word for that, samsara? There is a gentle melancholy and lonely quietude in the landscape paintings, the deep indigo.

But then there are the other aspects of of ukiyo-e I didn't know about until this thread like shungo, hot sex in all kinds of fun positions. The Japanese shungo paintings are marvellous, the formality, seriousness and abundant fabric of the subtly woven kimonos contrasted with the surprisingly raw private parts.

It seems "the floating world" and the contemporary term for this, "water trade", the night life of bars and brothels, courtesans, geisha, the entertainment world too, including kabuki, are part and parcel of the same idea.

jonp72 I really appreciate the film reference. I adore old Japanese movies, the few I've seen anyway and am looking forward to seeing Utamaro and His Five Women.
posted by nickyskye at 10:42 AM on April 8, 2007


jonp72 I really appreciate the film reference. I adore old Japanese movies, the few I've seen anyway and am looking forward to seeing Utamaro and His Five Women.

Unfortunately, it only appears to be available with English subtitles in an out-of-print VHS edition. I think there's a DVD with Spanish subtitles, however.
posted by jonp72 at 11:58 AM on April 8, 2007


Not to worry jonp72, bet my wonderful local library has a copy or can order one in the NYC public library system. But thanks for the heads up. (/derail, it just started snowing popcorn sized flakes a few minutes ago and then cleared up with a sparkling blue sky. Unexpected Easter parade weather.)
posted by nickyskye at 12:48 PM on April 8, 2007


mmmmmm....floooooaaaatiiiiiiing woooooooorrrrlllld....
posted by UbuRoivas at 5:21 PM on April 8, 2007


This is one of the best uses of Flash I have seen on the interwebs. Awesome post!
posted by grapefruitmoon at 8:31 PM on April 8, 2007


grapefruitmoon, a present, fireflies.
posted by nickyskye at 8:47 PM on April 8, 2007


Ha! These are excellent, thanks.
posted by dreamsign at 1:18 AM on April 9, 2007


Oooooh! Those fireflies are soooooo CUTE!
posted by grapefruitmoon at 8:11 AM on April 9, 2007


Hokusai did 36 views. Hiroshige did 36 as well. I believe the 24 number comes from a connection with a novella by Roger Zelazny. Or both numbers are divisible by 12.

Bah, I knew I'd get that comment the second I posted. From the link in the original post is a list of Hokusai's work, where 24 are compiled (Yes, the 24 comes from the novella. Perhaps Zelazny got tired of writing after 24?). But, yes, there are indeed 36 in the original series, or even 46 with the 10 later prints. All are worth viewing if you get the chance.
posted by Pan Agan at 3:26 PM on April 9, 2007


« Older Do the Muppet Thing   |   Plagiarists are stupid, throw rocks at them Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments



Post