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Bleeding cool
July 7, 2008 10:39 AM   Subscribe

Dress patterns made from bleeding markers. Simple, but totally awesome. (via ymk)
posted by mathowie (33 comments total) 9 users marked this as a favorite

 
Ah, the pattern on the fabric. I thought you meant that the pattern used to determine the shape of the dress and I was thoroughly confused.

That is a pretty cool idea though. I like the little pockets.

I don't read French, please tell me that someone got this idea by unexpectedly having a pen unload itself in their shirt pocket right before a meeting: "No, no. It's meant to look like that... Uh, I've got a whole line of clothes coming out based on this... yeah."
posted by quin at 10:47 AM on July 7, 2008 [2 favorites]


Hmm... I wonder if you would get a similar result if you laid the markers and cloth flat.
It would make a cool design on a tablecloth.
posted by meringue at 10:52 AM on July 7, 2008


If you did as meringue suggests, you'd have to make sure you didn't damage whatever surface you placed the cloth and markers upon. The advantage to the way it was displayed in the pictures is that you'd not get ink on other items.
posted by onhazier at 10:56 AM on July 7, 2008


Wonder how well they wash.
posted by small_ruminant at 10:58 AM on July 7, 2008


This is very cute. I would want a dress without the makers attached.
posted by LoriFLA at 11:00 AM on July 7, 2008


At first I was like "where are the ink-stained ones" and then I realized that all that regular geometry came from pens. Wow.
posted by DU at 11:01 AM on July 7, 2008


Wonder how well they wash.
posted by small_ruminant at 10:58 AM on July 7


My sharpie-and-sneaker experiment of '00 suggests "not so well".
posted by Benjy at 11:02 AM on July 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


Color me (heh!) confused as well. I assumed it would be instructions how to make dresses out of some kind of blood-identification tag that I wasn't familiar with called a "bleeding marker".

The alternative was that Matt had spontaneously acquired a British accent through some bizarre head injury.
posted by yhbc at 11:02 AM on July 7, 2008


A quick translation of...

En plaçant des feutres colorés dans les petites poches de la robe son aspect change avec le temps, en 1 heure à 1 heure trente, l'encre imprègne le tissu pour créer une robe unique - la robe peut ensuite être lavée pour être colorée à nouveau, à chaque fois, d'une manière différente…

By placing colored markers in the small pockets of the dress its appearance changes with time. In 1 to 1 hour and a half, the ink is absorbed by the fabric and creates a unique dress - the dress can then be washed so that it can be colored anew in a different way.
posted by splice at 11:05 AM on July 7, 2008


I was watching some Project Runway on the PVR last night, and Heidi Klum tricked me with the same wording: she chastised a contestant for "using a pattern" for her dress, and I momentarily thought the show had some stricture against using the 'cutting guide' type of pattern. But no, Heidi was against the coloured pattern on the fabric itself.

This was really cool to see, Matt. Thanks!
posted by chudmonkey at 11:08 AM on July 7, 2008


Ha! Neat.

And yeah, one more double-take on the "patterns" usage. I couldn't even find an M-V-C reference anywhere on the page, let alone Abstract Factory.
posted by cortex at 11:15 AM on July 7, 2008 [3 favorites]


I take fromt he consistency fo the diamond shaped ink spots that all these dresses are cut from the same fabric. It would be cool to see the various bleed-pattens other fabrics have.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:29 AM on July 7, 2008


I suppose you could load the markers with proper dyes if you wanted something more permanent.
posted by jedicus at 11:32 AM on July 7, 2008


They look better from a distance than they do up close.
posted by orange swan at 11:39 AM on July 7, 2008


Surf this site from across the room.
posted by netbros at 11:47 AM on July 7, 2008


Oops, yeah, I should have said "fabric patterns" instead of "dress patterns" in my post.
posted by mathowie at 11:55 AM on July 7, 2008


Wonder how well they wash.

Perhaps the colours fade enough to be completely hidden by the colours from the new markers.
posted by bjrn at 12:02 PM on July 7, 2008


The next step is to use Mr. Sketch smelly markers.
posted by aubilenon at 12:08 PM on July 7, 2008


Strange coincidence: Fernando Brizio is on the front cover of the magazine I work for this month. It hit newsstands about a week ago. The ink apparently washes right out. You pop the markers in the pockets just before going into a party, and then blossom as time goes on. He also casts pots by shaping them on a wheel in the normal manner and then, while the clay is still a bit wet, putting them in the back of a Land Rover and tearing around a dirt track. They come out a bit wonky and seasick. Interesting guy.
posted by WPW at 12:19 PM on July 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


I was totally hoping this would be some sort of "draw on your GF with a magic marker, put a white dress on her, get her all hot and sweaty, dress patterns!" Alas, no.
posted by jessamyn at 1:56 PM on July 7, 2008


This is just too cool.
posted by puddinghead at 3:10 PM on July 7, 2008


this is wonderful.
reminded me of this.
posted by Sreiny at 3:26 PM on July 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


I once had a white shirt that came out of the dryer completely patterned with graceful looping black lines.

It turned out that a black Pentel had survived the wash and gotten dumped into the dryer with the clothes. There, it managed to get wedged into one of the (Pentel-sized) ventilation holes in the back of the dryer. As the drum turned, it dragged the wet shirt across the pen, creating the pattern.

Well, I think it beats a piece of toast that kinda looks like the HVM.
posted by hexatron at 3:34 PM on July 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


I have a history of playing with fabrics and colors that began with smashing pomegranate seeds on a T-shirt when I was 12. Years of playing with dyes, natural and man-made, led to hand-painting lace in glorious, intricate detail. But alas, one day I realized I don't really like wearing colors; I prefer wearing clothes in white, black and gray solids. All those lovely hand-dyed silks were fine as pillows but when I made them into garments, they largely went unworn.

These days I confine my color experiments to canvas. Lately I've been imagining what it would be like to pour colors down a 1 foot by 6 foot panel.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 3:56 PM on July 7, 2008


Simple, but totally awesome.

No need for the "but"! Totally awesome and simple are so often synonymous!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:51 PM on July 7, 2008


FUCK YES
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 6:02 PM on July 7, 2008


Cool. I was fooled by 'patterns' too but pleasantly so. An ink-related (sorta) fashion thing I recently found: Ink blot fashion.
posted by madamjujujive at 6:03 PM on July 7, 2008


Way cool textile design!
posted by Jikido at 6:20 PM on July 7, 2008


Pretty.
posted by Arturus at 8:36 PM on July 7, 2008


onhazier writes "If you did as meringue suggests, you'd have to make sure you didn't damage whatever surface you placed the cloth and markers upon."

A sheet of glass is good for this kind of thing; basically impervious to the vast majority of household fluids. If you need to buy something specific a tempered sheet is more durable and safer.
posted by Mitheral at 11:01 PM on July 7, 2008


Lately I've been imagining what it would be like to pour colors down a 1 foot by 6 foot panel.
V V V
V V V
V V V
V v v
V v v
v v v
v v v
v v v
v v
v v
v v
morris louis
posted by sexyrobot at 12:28 AM on July 8, 2008


morris louis
V V V
V V V
V V V
V v v
V v v
v v v
v v v
v v v
v v
v v
v v
Sister Corita Kent
posted by rusty at 6:41 AM on July 8, 2008


Very cool, but this needs a time lapse video of the bleeding process.
posted by JBennett at 7:58 AM on July 8, 2008


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