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Scottish brewery launches beer with 32% alcohol content.
November 27, 2009 8:40 AM   Subscribe

'World's strongest' beer with 32% strength launched.

A warning on the label states: "This is an extremely strong beer; it should be enjoyed in small servings and with an air of aristocratic nonchalance. In exactly the same manner that you would enjoy a fine whisky, a Frank Zappa album or a visit from a friendly yet anxious ghost." (from the BBC)
So, who's in?
posted by Neekee (81 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
Extrapolating from my experience of other brews that were extra-strong for the sake of being extra-strong... *shudder*
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 8:43 AM on November 27, 2009 [5 favorites]


C'mon, what's the big deal... it's 68% alcohol-free!
posted by Crane Shot at 8:44 AM on November 27, 2009 [10 favorites]


Fraserburgh-based BrewDog have released the 32% Tactical Nuclear Penguin...

...it should be enjoyed in small servings and with an air of aristocratic nonchalance.

Heh.
posted by threetoed at 8:47 AM on November 27, 2009


This is beer that has been partially frozen to extract water and increase the concentration of alcohol. It's probably a philosophical point, but when is beer not a beer? (NOT-REINHEITSGEBOTIST)
posted by kuujjuarapik at 8:48 AM on November 27, 2009 [6 favorites]


In exactly the same manner that you would enjoy a fine whisky...

Then why wouldn't I just enjoy a fine whisky? I doubt this stuff would be better.
posted by rocket88 at 8:50 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


> aristocratic nonchalance

That's just a fancy-pants way of saying "drunken stupor."
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:52 AM on November 27, 2009 [4 favorites]


They appear to be using some form of freeze distillation to enhance the alcohol content. I don't think there are any yeasts that can make something even close to that strong.
posted by caddis at 8:54 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


kuujjuarapik: This is beer that has been partially frozen to extract water and increase the concentration of alcohol. It's probably a philosophical point, but when is beer not a beer? (NOT-REINHEITSGEBOTIST)

So-called "freeze distilling" isn't a new idea, and in fact, it isn't considered counter to the Reinheitsgebot.

Personally, though, I would bet money that there are many liqueurs with a similar ABV, better taste, and a lower price.
posted by paisley henosis at 8:55 AM on November 27, 2009


Eh. Ice is cheating, unless you're Canadian. More fermentables + sturdy multiple waves of yeast + insane amounts of leafy hops = the gentlemanly way.
posted by RobotVoodooPower at 8:55 AM on November 27, 2009


I'm just relieved this hasn't been launched in a country that has a particularly acute problem with alcoholism and underage drinking.
posted by game warden to the events rhino at 8:55 AM on November 27, 2009 [13 favorites]


It's probably a philosophical point, but when is beer not a beer?

It has a lot to do with how the spirits were made in the first place. Does a brandy (brandywine) still count as a wine because it was made from fermenting grapes, or count only as a liquor because of the distillation?

Given that it started its life as a beer, and probably tastes like a beer, it doesn't seem particularly wrong to call it a beer. I mean, it's not being distilled down and purified to tastelessness like vodka.
posted by explosion at 8:58 AM on November 27, 2009


> This is beer that has been partially frozen to extract water and increase the concentration of alcohol.

What, like Labatt Ice? Maybe they can get Michael Ironside or the (late) guy who dies at the end of Die Hard to plug it!
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:58 AM on November 27, 2009


If I thought something like this was a good idea I'd just dump some Everclear in my Miller Lite, but the idea of that is kind of revolting and I can't picture the Scottish brewery improving very much on the idea. I recall several years ago I homebrewed a case of Russian Imperial Stout, which was almost off the chart as far as beer goes. Fantastic stuff, but the calories will probably kill you before the alcohol does.
posted by crapmatic at 8:59 AM on November 27, 2009


Must be my age, but I'm definitely one for the 'session beer' rather than these over-powered ales that seem aimed at the student race-off-your-face market.
posted by Abiezer at 9:01 AM on November 27, 2009 [3 favorites]


oh for pete's sake, they're limiting the run to 500 bottles and charging 30 pounds per bottle, would take serious effort and cost to binge on that
posted by lizbunny at 9:02 AM on November 27, 2009 [5 favorites]


would take serious effort and cost to binge on that

Some people like a challenge.
posted by The Whelk at 9:04 AM on November 27, 2009


An interesting thing about these really strong beers is that they have enough alcohol to prevent or dissolve the usual head of foam. Mmm, solvent.

Actually I'm guessing that the ethanol interacts with some weird hydrogen-bonding shit involved in normal beer foam.
posted by exogenous at 9:04 AM on November 27, 2009


This is a distilled spirit, not beer. Harumph.
posted by boots at 9:05 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


The Card Cheat: What, like Labatt Ice?

No, not really anything like that. No-hamburgers.

explosion:
Given that it started its life as a beer, and probably tastes like a beer, it doesn't seem particularly wrong to call it a beer.


Similar products tend to be quite a bit different from what one normally expects from beer.

crapmatic:
If I thought something like this was a good idea I'd just dump some Everclear in my Miller Lite, but the idea of that is kind of revolting and I can't picture the Scottish brewery improving very much on the idea.


Couldn't agree more, personally.
posted by paisley henosis at 9:05 AM on November 27, 2009


aristocratic nonchalance

The state of mind which positively emanates from every street corner, underpass and housing estate in Scotland.
posted by fire&wings at 9:09 AM on November 27, 2009


oh for pete's sake, they're limiting the run to 500 bottles and charging 30 pounds per bottle, would take serious effort and cost to binge on that
Oh you and your 'facts' and 'reading the linked article'; you only spoil it for the rest of us. Anyway, here's some more of my opinions...
posted by Abiezer at 9:10 AM on November 27, 2009 [10 favorites]


Dogfish Head 120 minute IPA and Sam Adams Utopias are made conventionally. That is, they started with champagne yeast, good for maybe 14%, then worked up to 20% and 25% respectively. Freezing and removing water is cheating.
posted by fixedgear at 9:10 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


explosion: It has a lot to do with how the spirits were made in the first place.

I guess I meant that if whiskey is heat distilled from beer-like fermented grain mash to extract the alcohol and this stuff starts with fermented grain wort and is ice distilled to extract the water, the difference becomes slight. I'm not sure if I would still call distilled beer "beer". At least brandy gets a different name.
posted by kuujjuarapik at 9:14 AM on November 27, 2009


This is like 4 times the Alcohol of Hoppasarus Rex from Steelhead in oregon , which is mighty mighty bitter. Shouldn't they just call this a "sour" and get it over with?
posted by NiteMayr at 9:16 AM on November 27, 2009


Durn Bronzefist : Extrapolating from my experience of other brews that were extra-strong for the sake of being extra-strong... *shudder*

Agreed. I like good, strong ales - Microbrewed stouts, for the most part, but anything with a good amount of flavor and body to it. I like my beers/ales to practically count as a meal on their own, to give some context here.

And when you see offerings that start to get up over 16% alcohol, in my experience they universally taste like complete crap. First of all, to get that high, the brewmaster tends to sugar the hell out of them and then referment, which gives a taste more like burned molasses than a proper yeasty beery flavor.

Then to go even higher, you either need to use freeze distillation or directly add pure grain alcohol; and although the latter may sound aesthetically less pleasing, I'd call it the better approach. Non-beer fans may consider removal of ice crystals, such as with Molson Ice, a clever way to boost the ABV and add some flavor. That works only if you start with watery camel-piss, however. If you start with something actually having flavor (and as I mentioned, already getting into some unpleasantly strong sweet notes), you end up with something reminiscent of drinking coke syrup without reconstituting it.
posted by pla at 9:19 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


But does it follow the German Purity Laws?
posted by drezdn at 9:21 AM on November 27, 2009


Do they plan on making a version with caffeine?
posted by drezdn at 9:21 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


Ask a Belgian about the German Purity Laws and they'll tell you to stuff it. Rightly so, imho.
posted by kuujjuarapik at 9:23 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'm with Abiezer - the first and foremost important thing in a beer is flavour. If this process makes a great tasting beer, then it's good. I love a strong Trappist Ale, though I drink it in a wine glass out of deference to the 12% alcohol. (It's really a barley wine - a tasty barley wine.)

But strong beer just for the sake of strong beer? You might as well be a bunch of 16-year olds circa 1993, and drink Labatt's Ice as quickly as possible, noses plugged. Why not just drink straight Alcool instead? Or perhaps be more direct, and just hit yourself on the head multiple times.
posted by jb at 9:25 AM on November 27, 2009


Bloody lightweights don't even sell it by the pint...
posted by twine42 at 9:27 AM on November 27, 2009


From the company website:

Of the 500 330ml bottles released, 250 will be available for £35 with a further 250 available for £250 – the latter will include a share in the BrewDog company as part of its ‘Equity for Punks’ campaign which is aiming to raise £2.3m to build a new eco-friendly, carbon-neutral brewery in Aberdeen.

Well my plans to buy one just flew out the window. Noble cause tho...
posted by lizbunny at 9:30 AM on November 27, 2009


This is like 4 times the Alcohol of Hoppasarus Rex from Steelhead in oregon , which is mighty mighty bitter. Shouldn't they just call this a "sour" and get it over with?

The bitterness doesn't come from alcohol, it comes from hops... thus the Hop in the name. And a sour is something else entirely... the sourness usually comes from the yeast, often a wild strain.

Strong ales are usually characterized by a malty, sweet flavor and are much better IMO with little to no hops flavor.

Gulden Draak FTW.
posted by Huck500 at 9:35 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


I could have sworn that every STRONG beer i've had was so bitter due to the alcohol, well that's one to grow on.
posted by NiteMayr at 9:44 AM on November 27, 2009


STRONG being a relative term
posted by NiteMayr at 9:44 AM on November 27, 2009


the sourness usually comes from the yeast, often a wild strain

Or lactic acid bacteria.
posted by exogenous at 9:47 AM on November 27, 2009


The bitterness doesn't come from alcohol, it comes from hops... thus the Hop in the name. And a sour is something else entirely... the sourness usually comes from the yeast, often a wild strain.


And/or bacteria! (Flanders brown ales and what not.)
posted by Telf at 9:50 AM on November 27, 2009


The firm now plan to submit Tactical Nuclear Penguin, which was verified at Herriot Watt University in Edinburgh at 32%, to the Guinness Book of World Records.

Guinness Book of World Records, tee hee hee.
posted by bookish at 9:56 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


And there are penguins brewing/distilling it...
posted by patricio at 9:57 AM on November 27, 2009


They pretty much only did this to make a point. Binge drinking results from cheap beer, not high alcohol beer. If high alcohol was the problem liquor is a much bigger issue than high alcohol craft beer.

I like imperial stouts and double IPAs a ton, but anything with more alcohol than about 10% is nasty. Yes, especially the Dogfish 120.
posted by furiousxgeorge at 10:00 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


Man, and I thought lagers where bad...

But seriously, to me the whole point of beer (good beer) is to have a drink that lasts more than 3 seconds, is complex and tasty and doesn't knock your brains out if you have a pint or two.
posted by edgeways at 10:02 AM on November 27, 2009


"If I thought something like this was a good idea I'd just dump some Everclear in my Miller Lite"

I had an uncle that would do that. He called it an "Amnesia".

He's dead now.
posted by mr_crash_davis mark II: Jazz Odyssey at 10:03 AM on November 27, 2009 [8 favorites]


I could have sworn that every STRONG beer i've had was so bitter due to the alcohol

Well, think about it: it's the same thing that's in distilled spirits. Scotch is quite lovely, for instance, and typically has about 40% alcohol. And vodka is pretty much pure alcohol and water, and hasn't a trace of bitterness.
posted by Malor at 10:04 AM on November 27, 2009


lemme get a 40 dogg of that, kind sir

I'll stick with Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout (9% ABV, takes me 2 hours to drink a 12 oz bottle)
posted by porn in the woods at 10:05 AM on November 27, 2009


i've seen brew dog bottles at a local store - 16 bucks for 22 oz

it can't be that good
posted by pyramid termite at 10:10 AM on November 27, 2009


This is basically a massive eisbach beer. They store it at -20 while preparing it, which readily implies that it freezes and they pull the ice off to increase the alcohol.
posted by Maztec at 10:28 AM on November 27, 2009


I'll stick with Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout (9% ABV, takes me 2 hours to drink a 12 oz bottle)

Mmm... must go for some stout after work. This thread is making me thirsty.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 10:36 AM on November 27, 2009


For the responsible drinker and/ or designated driver, they DO have a lite version that is only 28%...
posted by jcworth at 10:38 AM on November 27, 2009


I've tried one good beer around 15% from Dogfish Head (American), but all the others above 10% that I've tried have kinda sucked.
posted by jeffburdges at 10:46 AM on November 27, 2009


Strong beers are far too sweet for me, if I were to drink it it would only be for the point of saying I have tried it. I imagine thats the same for most people who will buy this. The irony of course is i have drunk some of this breweries previous brews and they have been quite good and a little different..
posted by andrewnixon0 at 10:55 AM on November 27, 2009


Well, the strong Belgians I've had were always very (sometimes terribly) sweet, but somehow the doubles and triples from Unibroue (Quebec) don't tend to be. Then again, they top out at 9%.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 11:00 AM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'm just relieved this hasn't been launched in a country that has a particularly acute problem with alcoholism and underage drinking.

Yeah, it's also a good thing that it's impossible to find cheap beer or fortified wine - imagine the trouble that could cause.
posted by The Light Fantastic at 11:01 AM on November 27, 2009


Brew Dog ales tend to taste like the very worst of over hopped American craft beers. Not delicious. Not even good by British Ale standards.

If you want quality high alc beer then Belgian is the only way to go.
posted by srboisvert at 11:02 AM on November 27, 2009


Maudite is strong enough for me, thankyewverymuch.

If I want a whisky, I'll pour one.
posted by clvrmnky at 11:10 AM on November 27, 2009


Brew Dog ales tend to taste like the very worst of over hopped American craft beers

With you on the West Coast Problem. As a general guide, the further west the brewery is in the United States, the a given beer style will be. And I don't get it.

Which is why I like midwest and east craft brews -- give me Bell's, Schlafly's, Three Floyd's, etc. I don't mind hops, and an IPA should be hoppy, but Stone Brewing's Ruination IPA is a ruined beer.

The uber-strong beers all tend to be sweet because you load them with malt and keep fermenting them until they simply won't ferment anymore more. When you have specific gravities this high, hop utilization plummets, so you end up with the malt sweetness being paramount.

This is also why Stone Brewing's Arrogant Bastard is quite nice and drinkable, compared to Ruination IPA, despite them having similar hopping rates. There's much more malt in Arrogant Bastard, so the hop utilization is lower, and you get a decent balance.
posted by eriko at 11:10 AM on November 27, 2009


If straight life is so horrible for you you should just off yourself.

Or admit that you're bi-curious.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 11:16 AM on November 27, 2009 [3 favorites]


With you on the West Coast Problem. As a general guide, the further west the brewery is in the United States, the a given beer style will be. And I don't get it.

I think I get the gist of this, and may even agree. A few notable exceptions, Sierra Nevada in general is decent, not my absolute fav. but they are very drinkable and do come in pry top bottles which is good when I'm collecting for a home-brew batch, also Anchor Steam is also ok, but my biggest problem with that is, of course, the absurdity of trademarking "Steam", thereby effectively disallowing anyone else to make and sell Steam bear (or at least call it by it's correct name thereby making it easy to find and compare).

My baseline is Summit Pale Ale.
posted by edgeways at 11:42 AM on November 27, 2009


clvrmnky: I'll stick with Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout (9% ABV, takes me 2 hours to drink a 12 oz bottle)
posted by porn in the woods at 1:05 PM on November 27 [+] [!] [Q]


Same point for beers aged in bourbon (or other whiskey) bottles.
posted by paisley henosis at 11:54 AM on November 27, 2009




Same point for beers aged in bourbon (or other whiskey) bottles.

Barrels?
posted by fixedgear at 12:09 PM on November 27, 2009


It's a great name, however the beer itself turns out taste-wise.
Living on the northern edge of the Land of Pilsners I have been drinking my way through this end of the beer rainbow. So so so many exceptional German beers, brewed in small batches sold pretty much only in the eastern end of the country and available - I tried to find some to gift to my brother in law - and they simply are not available - it's a crying shame except that I doubt they would travel so well anyway. Fresh Berliner Pilsner makes me about as happy as fresh not-cold Guiness.
Back in Brooklyn I was really partial to the Unibrue beers (Maudite, Trois Pistoles, etc.) but they were pretty heavy and not 'refreshing' in the way of a good pilsner.
posted by From Bklyn at 12:11 PM on November 27, 2009


That's no beer. It's a space station.
posted by ...possums at 12:13 PM on November 27, 2009


chillmost : They released a 1.1% alcohol beer in September called Nanny State after getting crap for their last high alcohol percent beer.

Best... Response... Ever.

You really have to wonder about the other side, though... "Campaigners welcomed the 1.1% alcohol Nanny State but said the name showed a lack of appreciation of the problem". Wow. Way to completely miss the point, guys - BrewDog didn't release that as a serious offering (and probably took a bath on it financially, just to make a point), they released it solely to tell you where to stick your, well, "nanny state" whining.

And "The company had insisted the £9.99 high strength beer would help tackle the country's binge-drinking culture, because customers would drink it in smaller quantities. But Alcohol Focus Scotland had branded that argument ''deluded''" . Dunno about the rest of you, but at the equivalent of USD$20 per pint, you can bet you wouldn't see me chugging these like happy-hour pitchers of Swiller Lite. Not that the existence of a $20 pint will stop the party crowd from getting sloshed on those same happy-hour pitchers, but really, to suggest that a significant number of people will drink more because of a fairly high-priced limited-edition beer, that I would call "deluded".
posted by pla at 1:30 PM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'm guessing most of the people on the thread haven't tried their beers. I'm not much of a beer drinker, but out of curiosity I've tasted shot-glass size measures of Brewdog beers from my other half's purchases of their wares, and they are wonderful. They do a beer called Paradox which is aged in really peaty malt whisky casks and it is one of the tastiest things ever. Their last really strong beer Tokyo had a gorgeous taste.

Tokyo is also the strongest beer we have ever made. It is a 18.2% imperial stout brewed with jasmine and cranberries added in the kettle.

After fermentation we dry hop the beer with a combination of North American and New Zealand Hops. Furthermore we then age this beer for 4 weeks on toasted vanilla French oak chips.


I'd happily sip tiny glasses of these, and I'll be interested to see how the Tactical Nuclear Penguin tastes. I have a feeling it will shortly be coming to a man near me and his beer glass.

Brewdog beers tend to be sold in very upmarket pubs in Scotland, they're posh and not very likely to be the rocket fuel of choice of most problem drinkers who prefer the cheapest drink possible. The huge problem in Scotland is with ultra cheap drink and the popularity of tipping it down our throats. But attacking alcohol pricing is politically very difficult, our SNP government just tried and can't get the other parties to support them (lots of people vote and they like cheap drink), it's much easier to do 'tough on demon alcohol' posturing where people fulminate about drink regardless of whether it's likely to do any harm or not. Thus the hysteria about a super-posh beer hardly anyone will ever see a bottle of. Brewdog know this and use it as marketing tool - they like to tweak the nose of the anti-alcohol police.
posted by Flitcraft at 1:36 PM on November 27, 2009


I don't mind hops, and an IPA should be hoppy, but Stone Brewing's Ruination IPA is a ruined beer.

I will admit to having had a flirtation with these super-hopped IPAs, but lately I've been caught dallying with far more balanced beers. There's a reason so many traditional beer styles (but not all, Belgium I'm looking at you) avoid such extremes.

And high alcohol beers have never interested me much at all.
posted by tommasz at 1:42 PM on November 27, 2009


our SNP government just tried and can't get the other parties to support them (lots of people vote and they like cheap drink

And BrewDog launched the beer on the very day the SNP launched their attempt to get the Alcohol Bill through (as it happened, the attempt stalled the same day).

Whatever their beer's like, you can't fault their PR.
posted by penguin pie at 2:09 PM on November 27, 2009


I don't mind hops, and an IPA should be hoppy, but Stone Brewing's Ruination IPA is a ruined beer.

Agreed. Stone Brewing's output is massively overrated, and the whole Arrogant Bastard thing is a juvenile turn-off. Moylan's is where the action is for hop bombs.

But I mostly drink PBR [NOT HIPSTER-IST] so what the hell do I know.
posted by porn in the woods at 2:16 PM on November 27, 2009


"Have you had anything to drink tonight, sir?"

"Jusht one beer, offisher."
posted by bwg at 3:30 PM on November 27, 2009


Agreed. Stone Brewing's output is massively overrated, and the whole Arrogant Bastard thing is a juvenile turn-off.

Wow. How drunk do you have to be to be so wrong?

I kid, but having relocated from Southern California (where the beer has FLAVOR) to Silicon Valley where the local microbrews tend to be meh at best... Man, I miss me some freshly growler'd Smoked Porter or Arrogant Bastard.
posted by mdaugherty82 at 4:22 PM on November 27, 2009 [1 favorite]


Everyone needs a chug.
posted by turgid dahlia at 5:21 PM on November 27, 2009 [2 favorites]


Well, the strong Belgians I've had were always very (sometimes terribly) sweet, but somehow the doubles and triples from Unibroue (Quebec) don't tend to be. Then again, they top out at 9%.

They did do one that was 13% a while back, although I'm darned if I can remember the name. I'm still waiting to try their new Chambly Noire.
posted by Zinger at 5:34 PM on November 27, 2009


I'm a fan of Stone and even I would agree that the marketing of Arrogant Bastard is pretty damn juvenile. Hey, congratulations, you figured out how to put a shitload of hops into a beer. What are you, Carl's fucking Jr?
posted by dhammond at 8:49 PM on November 27, 2009 [2 favorites]


total aside, but:

I love anything that advertises its use of "champagne yeast" as if this implies anything about the quality of the final product. Champagne yeast is popular because it is cheap, can survive high concentrations of alcohol and doesn't produce much sulphur.

And aged on oak chips. Jesus, don't even get me started.
posted by elwoodwiles at 11:12 PM on November 27, 2009 [2 favorites]


They did do one that was 13% a while back, although I'm darned if I can remember the name. I'm still waiting to try their new Chambly Noire.

Well now you've got me curious.

I see I was completely wrong (and they have far more brews -- or have had -- than I'd realized), and they run up to 10.5 and even one 11. No 13 listed, though, hmm.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 11:49 PM on November 27, 2009


Actually, I've had most of their active brews but missed most of their retired ones. That's sad.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 11:50 PM on November 27, 2009


I can't stop laughing at the "ZOMG BUT ALCOHOLISM! BUT TEENAGE BINGE DRINKING" comments. What the fuck, people? You think that a fine artisan craft beer that costs a whopping 30 quid a bottle is going to increase teenage binge drinking when they can get a 24-pack for 7? This is a craft beer for beer snobs.
posted by tehloki at 2:33 PM on November 28, 2009 [1 favorite]


I love a strong Trappist Ale, though I drink it in a wine glass out of deference to the 12% alcohol. (It's really a barley wine - a tasty barley wine.)

Trappist ales are not barley wines. There are different beer styles that fall under the umbrella of the Trappist category since Trappist just refers to the fact that the beer was brewed by monks. There are only seven Trappist breweries in Belgium.
posted by MaryDellamorte at 5:33 PM on November 28, 2009


Trappist just refers to the fact that the beer was brewed by monks.

The Trappist designation just means that the brewing process takes place within the walls of the abbey and "under control" of Trappist monks. I think that Westvleteren may be the only one where monks are still doing the actual brewing. Most of the abbeys hire townsfolk for the labor.

There are only seven Trappist breweries in Belgium.

There are actually only seven in the whole world(that produce beer). Six in Belgium, one in the Netherlands.
posted by esch at 2:06 PM on November 29, 2009


Doh, totally forgot one was in the Netherlands. I'm flooded with beer info 5 days a week so it's sometimes hard to keep it all straight.
posted by MaryDellamorte at 2:54 PM on November 29, 2009


I tend to prefer a lighter beer like Sam Adams Utopias.
posted by Horace Rumpole at 4:25 PM on November 30, 2009


by 'lighter beer' do you mean a beer that you can use to fuel your lighter?
posted by kuujjuarapik at 4:49 PM on November 30, 2009


one in the Netherlands.

De Koningshoeven, try the bock, it rocks.
posted by furiousxgeorge at 11:16 PM on December 1, 2009


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