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Englishman in New York
February 26, 2010 9:54 AM   Subscribe

Craig Ferguson talks to Stephen Fry. In five parts, without an audience.
posted by Harry (89 comments total) 122 users marked this as a favorite

 
On a workday?!

Anticipation...
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 9:55 AM on February 26, 2010


Without an audience? And what are we?
posted by TwelveTwo at 10:00 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


This is like chocolate and peanut butter.
posted by The Whelk at 10:00 AM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


This is great. I love the lack of audience; love Ferguson for trying it. It's weird; he still pauses for laughter/applause when he says something that would normally engender a response, and there's a brief deer-in-headlights oh that bombed flicker before he jumps back in.
posted by Shepherd at 10:00 AM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


Not even an audience machine?
posted by the other side at 10:03 AM on February 26, 2010


These guys have both seen Charlie Rose, right? Wake me when they lose the set, both dress in turtle necks and talk as floating heads for an hour.

(I guess the Beatles already did this?)
posted by JBennett at 10:11 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I really do love this format. I don't watch late-night TV but I have growing respect for Ferguson and of course Fry is always worth watching. Thanks for posting this! Hope to see more experimental, lengthy and intelligent audience-free interviews of this type from Ferguson in the future.
posted by The Winsome Parker Lewis at 10:13 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Wow, I really like this audience free format. It makes it feel like the studio is full of stern faces staring down the host and guest, and I can empathize with that.
posted by TwelveTwo at 10:17 AM on February 26, 2010


I'll have to watch the whole thing later, just popped in to say.
  1. It's not that unusual for daytime talk shows to have audience-free interviews; I know Oprah has done it a couple of times, but normally for celebrities that simply don't want to rub shoulders with the common plebs.
  2. I have the biggest man-crush on Stephen Fry. I'm not even sure what it is exactly, he just seems so solidly nice. Known colloquially as England's "national treasure".
  3. Never knew about Ferguson's tatto, it is badass, particularly as a naturalized citizen.
  4. If and when Charlie Rose does kick the bucket, I think Ferguson would make an admirable replacement. He's incredibly smart and actually does interview the guests and bring out interesting things. As much as I enjoy(ed) Conan, he was actually sort of a lousy interviewer in the sense of helping you learn about the person being interviewed (although he was often excellent at revealing that person's character, a different thing altogether).
posted by Deathalicious at 10:32 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


JBennett: These guys have both seen Charlie Rose, right?

Yes. In fact, Craig references him specifically in his explanation of why he's doing this particular episode of his show this way.
posted by tzikeh at 10:34 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


5. What on earth are those things on the table? Yerba maté gourds?
posted by Deathalicious at 10:34 AM on February 26, 2010


Dana Stevens agrees with us
posted by Think_Long at 10:36 AM on February 26, 2010


This is why I was such a fan of the old Tom Snyder show. Nothing beats listening to smart or funny people talk at length. More of this, Craig.
posted by davebush at 10:41 AM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


This is lovely. Thanks.
posted by lholladay at 10:46 AM on February 26, 2010


Dana Stevens has apparently never seen Ferguson's show before since she had no idea what the snake mugs were. That was definitely a great conversation, though. I laughed my ass off at the Wordsworth "Solitary Reaper" pleonasm bit (which was a discussion topic in my lit class recently) -- you just can't go a week without that tired old vaudeville gag coming up on one talk show after another.
posted by FelliniBlank at 10:50 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


oh great another craig ferguson love fest you guys know he reads metafilter right?

DONT GET TOO BIG FOR YR BRITCHES C-DOG JUST BECAUSE YOURE THE BEST HOST OF A TV SHOW EVER AND PRETTY MUCH THE ONLY THING I WATCH ON NETWORK TV BESIDES FOOTBALL
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:51 AM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


Craig never has an audience... just an audience machine operated by a couple of teamsters backstage.
posted by painquale at 10:55 AM on February 26, 2010


You also missed the intro
posted by Bonzai at 10:57 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


All we need now are posts on Alan Davies, Jo Brand, and Rich Hall and we'll have a QI episode.
posted by wanderingmind at 11:01 AM on February 26, 2010 [6 favorites]


How can you not love Fry when he says, in his lilting London accent "yes, well, just to pinch the loaf of that thought..."
posted by fatbird at 11:02 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


> Craig never has an audience... just an audience machine operated by a couple of teamsters backstage.

That joke's done, thanks.
posted by ardgedee at 11:05 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I now find myself desperately wanting a grubby tweed iPhone cozy emblazoned with trolls and Scrabble tiles...
posted by Diagonalize at 11:07 AM on February 26, 2010


tzikeh. Yeah, I was just reacting to their start where they seemed to marveling at the format.

I am all for the varying of rigidly formatted shows. I never understood why all the late night shows had to have the exact same format from episode to episode. It's just too bad that this is so rare in latenight. Glad to see CF trying it out. It works.
posted by JBennett at 11:08 AM on February 26, 2010


This indeed reminded me of old-style interview shows. Or Charlie Rose, although Rose's show was never this laid back. Tom Snyder was mentioned... Didn't Dick Cavett do a show without an audience? The short lived Bob Costas interview show was also great.

Even Bill Maher did some longer-form interviews sans audience last season.

And Fry is looking toward becoming a US citizen? How totally groovy! Fry is like a more well-read, less fanboy-followed version of Douglas Adams in so many ways. I've followed him for decades (although not on twitter). I keep waiting for him to make his big breakthrough here in the US, so he can be as widely appreciated as he seems to be in the UK. Although maybe it's better that he's sort of under the radar. That way, his awesomeness won't be quite as tainted by the giant corrupting machine.
posted by hippybear at 11:10 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


Saw this when it aired on Tuesday. It was a refreshing change of pace and he couldn't have had a better guest for the experiment. Craig realizes what kind of audience he attracts and he takes a few liberties to be truly different from all the other late night hosts. His show is less about cheap topical laughs but being silly and having fun with his guests, throw in a few puppets and off you go.

That said, I love Mr. Ferguson with his exciting trousers and his desire for a vacuum with the proper amount of suction. If you folks haven't read American On Purpose, stop what you're doing and do so now.
posted by cgomez at 11:13 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'm gonna have to make some kind of Stephen Fry trap with a nice bottle of port and a kicky cravat under a cardboard box or something....
posted by The Whelk at 11:13 AM on February 26, 2010 [9 favorites]


Thanks for this. I know folks often complain about YouTube links, but as someone who can stream it to my TV, I would like to vote for as many as possible when they are this awesome because the more TV time gets taken up by things like this, the closer this TV loving fool gets to eliminating my cable bill.

(This will probably never happen, but my checking account can dream.)

I've read a lot of love for this online through out the week but hadn't thought to catch it online until this post. Late night talk show with conversation between funny, intelligent guys I find entertaining but no audience sounds a lot like Charlie Rose (except with funny, intelligent guys I find entertaining).

If I'm going to be up this late, I need to start watching Craig Ferguson more often. I'm never disappointed.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 11:19 AM on February 26, 2010


Thanks SO much for this!

Not only do I have an unnatural obsession with Stephen Fry (which I will do my best not to pursue now that I know he's living in LA,) but I absolutely would have had no idea this interview even happened.

Fry & Laurie was great, Fry & Ferguson I could TOTALLY get behind! I could watch these two talk for months on end and be riveted.
posted by buzzkillington at 11:20 AM on February 26, 2010


How did I not know he's Jewish?
posted by Astro Zombie at 11:22 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


Deathalicious, the things on the table are ceramic mugs shaped like coiled snakes. Craig uses one every night and has thoughtfully provided one for Mr. Fry.

And speaking of refreshment, I could listen to these two gents all day. This is lovely, thanks for posting.
posted by kinnakeet at 11:22 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Best youtube comment of the week:
hawaiisaywhat (1 hour ago) 0 Reply
As a troll I feel quite offended by Stephen's remarks. Yes we are vulgar and irritating but don't disregard us out of hand. We are merely lonely people who want to be heard.

posted by Potomac Avenue at 11:22 AM on February 26, 2010 [19 favorites]


The thought of Stephen Fry and Douglas Adams geeking out over UK Macs #1 and #2 makes me smile endlessly. This interview was just wonderful. I stumbled upon it in a fit of sleeplessness when it aired and was pretty much in heaven.

Wow, I miss Douglas Adams.
posted by mintcake! at 11:22 AM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


Stephen Fry is a bumptious ponce and a corporate whore. He's more like a walking brand than a real person - bottles of port and cravats indeed - carefully cultivating his image as the quintessential English upper class boffin and then renting it out to Marks & Spencers, Tescos, Twinings etc....
Shame he irritates me so much because I actually find him very interesting to listen to. It's all those adverts that grind me down.... and the time he apparently got an award for his depression.... and the time he gave up twittering because he couldn't handle the trolls poking fun at precious little twotty Steven... :) /rant lol
posted by Monkeymoo at 11:24 AM on February 26, 2010 [3 favorites]


This is great. Thanks for posting.
posted by brundlefly at 11:30 AM on February 26, 2010


Didn't Stephen describe exactly the kind of thing Monkeymoo is doing in that interview? How very very Meta!
posted by hippybear at 11:33 AM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


I wonder if Fry's eloquent defense of Twitter (pleonasm!) will change the minds of any of MetaFilter's bizarre Twitter-hating sqad.
posted by Astro Zombie at 11:33 AM on February 26, 2010


This episode was like candy to me -- I love moments where Fry demonstrates he's not necessarily as highbrow, or Ferguson not as lowbrow, as one might expect from their usual material.

Speaking of which: what the hell is up with Ferguson's nonstop jaunts into queeny stereotyping? I'm relatively new to the show and overall just love it to death, but those bits just reek of bad '80s standup. (Wasn't too impressed with his comments re: the "90% straight" email the other night either.)
posted by Lazlo at 11:34 AM on February 26, 2010


Learn new words with The Whelk! Today's word Persona
posted by The Whelk at 11:34 AM on February 26, 2010


This is fantastic so far and I love them both.

Btw, I wonder how much crossover there is between 'early adopters' and 'drug users'.
posted by empath at 11:49 AM on February 26, 2010


Oooh, I need a firefox plugin that extracts youtube audio so I can listen to this on the go.
posted by mecran01 at 11:50 AM on February 26, 2010


That Brow Beat blog is good readin'.
posted by GuyZero at 11:57 AM on February 26, 2010


mecran01: dirpy.
posted by ocherdraco at 11:57 AM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


That tattoo is bad ass.
posted by brundlefly at 12:16 PM on February 26, 2010


So great. Emailed the show via their form to let them know how much I appreciate the experiment. I don't watch a lot of TV, but will have Craig in mind when I do.
posted by CharlesV42 at 12:17 PM on February 26, 2010


I got a little heartbroken hearing about Stephen Fry's bipolar disorder. Sometimes it seems like smart and clever almost always = sad.
posted by moons in june at 12:35 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Ferguson is so damn great. He was brilliant as Mr. Wick in the old Drew Carey show and I could not believe our luck when the network execs chose him for the Late Late Show. And did everyone see his amazing eulogy to his father? (I know I have posted it before but part 1, part 2.
posted by LarryC at 12:38 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


5. What on earth are those things on the table? Yerba maté gourds?

Not quite, they are coiled rattlesnake mugs. He got the mugs at the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque. Growing up in Arizona, with a HUGE fear of snakes in general and rattlesnakes in particular, it creeps me out no end.

Read more about this broadcast and the Audience in general.

I do love me some Craig Ferguson. We DVR the show and watch it instead of the usual crap during prime time. Most of the time I'd rather watch Craig do his stuff, the interview is ancillary and while I think he does a great interview (so much better than say Letterman asking Hugh Laurie about his father's olympic gold medal in rowing) his regular happy self is such a hoot.
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 12:38 PM on February 26, 2010


Ooops--part 2.
posted by LarryC at 12:38 PM on February 26, 2010


I love moments where Fry demonstrates he's not necessarily as highbrow, or Ferguson not as lowbrow, as one might expect from their usual material.

When you're not merely highbrow, nor merely lowbrow, but conversant in both categories, are you, then... unibrow?
posted by Anything at 12:51 PM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


First: I watch his show occasionally, but I watch for him; I always shut it down once the first guest comes out. I find him compelling, but not his guests.

Having said that, this episode was fantastic, both for him (I enjoyed the opening without an audience, I find him much more compelling when he's being funny without the audience laughing for me) and Stephen Fry is always worth a listen. That made this the first episode I've ever watched all the way through, and I didn't delete it from the TiVo afterwards.

Now, was it a fantastic interview? Nope, but it was a crack at a new (to him) format, and I figure if he did this regularly, it would take about two weeks before he'd have the pattern and rhythm down. Of course, that assumes he'd be able to find guests as interesting as Stephen Fry. Good luck with that.

With any luck, he'll keep on doing his show as-is (the next day's show, he seemed refreshed from the experience somehow) but will switch to this format every time he lands a guest of that caliber.

Also: when they started talking about Twitter et al, I was really hoping they'd mention MetaFilter, and it would turn out they were both members. Alas, no.
posted by davejay at 12:57 PM on February 26, 2010


Oh, and watching the show, I started thinking that it would be nice to routinely pair up two (somewhat) famous people who are also old friends, for one night's worth of talk like this, as a regular series. There's something compelling about watching well-known people with a substantial public image being relaxed and a bit more intimate (in-jokes and all.)
posted by davejay at 12:59 PM on February 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


Not nation-ist, but not really beleiving I'm seeing this on mainstream American television. Is this really the same market (give or take an hour) that Jay Leno competes in?

This is smarter and more thoughtful than anything even Stewart or Colbert do.
posted by bicyclefish at 1:00 PM on February 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


Maybe it's just the accents.
posted by bicyclefish at 1:03 PM on February 26, 2010


Emailed the show via their form

Dear Show,

I'm writing in support of the experiment of not having an audience, whether for cost-cutting or varieties sake. I didn't miss the lack of 'braying' and 'hooting' dorks, and I hope you adopt it permanently. The only trick is you'll then have to only have interesting guests. Even c-dogg can't make a charlie rose style tete-a-tete with some b-list actor or Kathy Griffin unexcruciating. Only Shatner has that gift.

Anyway, keep up the good work,
-P


SENT
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:14 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Thanks for the link about the audience Ruthless Bunny! I'm curious why Craig Ferguson has to pay his audience to show up. He seems pretty popular, or at least popular enough to get people to sit through a free show. Don't most people like free stuff? Maybe he's just not that popular out in LA.
posted by bluefly at 1:15 PM on February 26, 2010


davejay: have you seen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iconoclasts_(TV_series)
posted by :-) at 1:27 PM on February 26, 2010


(updated the post to include the missing fifth part)
posted by mathowie at 1:31 PM on February 26, 2010


Wait. Fry & Grant Morrison are working together on a cross between Brigadoon & Twin Peaks? I am so there!
posted by Pronoiac at 1:36 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


/rant lol
Ah, good, ignorable.
posted by bonaldi at 1:42 PM on February 26, 2010


Yes, audience free talk is way much totally better.

Charlie Rose is an obsequious dunderhead. If only Larry Mantle could get that gig.
posted by mrhappy at 1:48 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


While I loved Tuesday's show, I hope it doesn't become a nightly permanent thing, because then we'd miss out on stuff like this.
posted by dirigibleman at 2:02 PM on February 26, 2010


I'm surprised they normally pay the audience members, it's such a small studio. If I had a TV show, I could probably fill that many seats with a facebook invite. Then again, it's filmed during the day, isn't it?
posted by empath at 2:06 PM on February 26, 2010


When you're not merely highbrow, nor merely lowbrow, but conversant in both categories, are you, then... unibrow?

Anything, one answer is hilobrow.
posted by cgc373 at 2:21 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


davejay: have you seen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iconoclasts_(TV_series)

Damn you cable television, why must you tempt me so? Thanks for that link!
posted by davejay at 2:42 PM on February 26, 2010


Astro Zombie: How did I not know he's Jewish?

Well, he isn't religiously, culturally, or politically. He has never been a part of the Jewish faith; he's one of England's most famous atheists, though not as outspoken as MeFi favorites Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins. He himself didn't know much about his Jewish heritage until he took part in a British geneaology show called "Who Do You Think You Are." His mother's parents (and his mum) had left eastern Europe in the late 20's. The rest of that side of the family died in the camps.
posted by tzikeh at 2:43 PM on February 26, 2010


Previously...
posted by JoeXIII007 at 3:21 PM on February 26, 2010


I started thinking that it would be nice to routinely pair up two (somewhat) famous people who are also old friends, for one night's worth of talk like this, as a regular series.

There is a series that crops up on Radio 4 over here called Chain Reaction which sort of does that. The previous week's guest interviews a guest of their choice, and on through the series. I'd certainly like to see a longer format show doing that sort of thing.

And I'll add... it seems I've finally grown to a point of quite liking Ferguson, after a long while of gradually warming to him. But I hope he continues doing this, and finding some guests as routinely fascinating as Fry, as I would probably wind up watching it regularly.
posted by opsin at 3:49 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I wonder if Fry's eloquent defense of Twitter (pleonasm!) will change the minds of any of MetaFilter's bizarre Twitter-hating sqad.

No, but CraigyFerg has completely changed my opinion of robot skeleton armies, and I find myself frequently muttering the totally great Check Ze Tweets jingle throughout the day.
posted by FelliniBlank at 4:06 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


he took part in a British geneaology show called "Who Do You Think You Are."

Ha! I was just reading about a U.S. version of the show being shot at the Massachusetts Historical Society, and thinking what a surprisingly tasteful reality show that was for NBC to be running. Of course it's a knockoff of a British show.
posted by Horace Rumpole at 4:49 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Speaking of which: what the hell is up with Ferguson's nonstop jaunts into queeny stereotyping?

That's long been a part of his shtick. I find him fairly uncomfortable to watch, and I'm rarely awkweirded out.
posted by mrgrimm at 5:33 PM on February 26, 2010


What is the title of the Robert Graves essay about poetry, compression, and Wordsworth, that Fry talks about?
posted by LobsterMitten at 6:03 PM on February 26, 2010


Rhaomi's previous paean to Ferguson...
posted by Cold Lurkey at 7:16 PM on February 26, 2010


Now look -- don't get mad at me just because I'm tryin' something

Ahhh... February experiment.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 8:36 PM on February 26, 2010


I'm finally getting around to watching this, and once again I'm fascinated by my reaction to Fry, the guy is just riveting. I honestly don't get it, but every time I see him in virtually anything, I'm just forced to watch the entire thing. I lost weeks once I found out about QI. It's like, everything the guy touches is compelling and interesting.

I saw Ferguson tweeting about his ideas for this a bit ago, and I figured it wouldn't happen, just due to the logistics of doing a full hour interview with no audience.

Glad to see I was wrong,
posted by quin at 10:17 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Charlie Rose is an obsequious dunderhead.

Agreed. Watching Charlie Rose simpering and giggling in an effort to match wits with Jon Stewart, for example is absolutely painful.

posted by KokuRyu at 10:22 PM on February 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I enjoy watching both of these men separately, so getting to watch them together in this type of setting was wonderful. What an excellent conversation to get to eavesdrop on, and without all the shouty and loud. I'd wanted to watch it on Tuesday, but didn't because I had something else that had to get done. Thank you, Harry, for the links.
posted by lilywing13 at 1:00 AM on February 27, 2010


LobsterMitten, the Graves essay appears to be called "Wordsworth by Cable" but I can't find an online copy.
posted by cgc373 at 5:24 AM on February 27, 2010 [2 favorites]


Mark Lawson has been doing a similar format on BBC Four for some years. Here he is talk to Brian Cox:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006mj91 (uk only, sorry)
posted by feelinglistless at 7:04 AM on February 27, 2010


Ha! I was just reading about a U.S. version of the show being shot at the Massachusetts Historical Society, and thinking what a surprisingly tasteful reality show that was for NBC to be running. Of course it's a knockoff of a British show.

Just think of it of a ripoff of PBS's ripoff of a British show.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:25 AM on February 27, 2010


That was a great show. But, then, it was Stephen Fry.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:13 AM on February 27, 2010


Love this:

"This is sort of a truth about all humans. When you arrive at a party and everybody in your mind is armed with a club and all you have a little q-tip behind your back and you think somehow everybody else was at a lesson at school where they learnt some life trick that you will never know because you missed that lesson and you'll never catch up. And they think the same of you."
posted by eperker at 10:36 AM on February 27, 2010 [3 favorites]


I'm gonna have to make some kind of Stephen Fry trap with a nice bottle of port and a kicky cravat under a cardboard box or something....

"Stephen Fry Trap" seems like the punchline to a joke about a carnivorous British plant of some sort. Not going to take the time to figure it out, but I'm sure it's there.
posted by me3dia at 12:24 PM on February 27, 2010 [1 favorite]


Thank you, cgc373!
posted by LobsterMitten at 2:00 PM on February 27, 2010


Thank you, so very, very much for this.

God, how I love Stephen Fry. And all the better for his foibles.
posted by CaptApollo at 9:39 PM on February 27, 2010


Now I'm going to have to slip the word "pleonastic" (defn) into at least one of my conversations within the next week.
posted by spherical_perceptions at 11:35 PM on February 27, 2010


I particularly identified with this exchange:

Craig: "... I'd always assumed that you were the golden, gifted child. You know, the Cambridge education, the studying of the classics, the knowing lots of clever people who were very attractive and rich. And I had a particular chip on my shoulder about that group of people. I had kind of grown up thinking that, that the intelligentsia..."

Stephen: "...That we were all ghastly. That we were all horrible, spoiled, pampered, over-praised... and I knew that that's how everybody thought of me. And I thought that I was from a generation that was born at least twenty years too late. That maybe if I had been born in the '50s, when wearing a tweed jacket, and smoking a pipe, and talking about Catullus and Ovid was somehow acceptable, and you were admired for it - whereas I felt that I was born into a "Post-Punk" era in which even the idea of speaking in sentences that didn't break up at the end, and go "sort of" and "like" and "oh, I wonder" but... Just having an articulate voice was in itself an offense. It was like rubbing people's faces in the dirt...

C: "Yes!"

S: "And I was *hated* for it. [...] So I genuinely felt that simply my affect, my manner, everything about me was guaranteed to make people despise me."

C: "Do you think that that still exists?"

S: "There are parts of me that think that, yes. But I know that that they would find me even less acceptable if I fraudulently attempted to be demotic, and street and hip. It just doesn't suit me. It's like when I wear sunglasses: no matter how bright the sun, people say 'what are you doing wearing sunglasses?'"

C: "Yeah, you're English, you should accept the brightness."

S: "But there are some British people: no one would say that to Mick Jagger."

C: "Right."

S: "You know, there are British people who are cool, hard to believe as it is. And then there are people like me who just seem to be made of tweed. I can't help it."

posted by stewiethegreat at 12:46 AM on February 28, 2010 [4 favorites]


I wish I was made of tweed. But I know I'm made of a a sort of cotton/nylon solution.
posted by feelinglistless at 12:55 PM on February 28, 2010


I started thinking that it would be nice to routinely pair up two (somewhat) famous people who are also old friends, for one night's worth of talk like this, as a regular series. There's something compelling about watching well-known people with a substantial public image being relaxed and a bit more intimate (in-jokes and all.)

I would absolutely watch this. I actually saw some fluff entertainment show try this with Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner, and not only was it a fun conversation, you could tell they were having an absolute blast themselves.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:35 AM on March 5, 2010


Craig talking with Steve Jones ( Sex Pistols ) on Steves ex-radio show .
A little extra for those who want them;

Shows
posted by stuartmm at 11:00 AM on March 8, 2010


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