May 28

It’s a step of friendship and peace between two peoples.

Iceland district repeals decree allowing Basque sailors to be killed on sight. A memorial dedicated to the 32 Basque whalers who were killed in the West Fjords in 1615 in what’s known as Iceland’s only mass murder Spánverjavígin was unveiled in Hólmavík, the West Fjords, on April 22, the last day of winter. At the occasion, West Fjords district commissioner Jónas Guðmundsson revoked the order allowing Basque sailors to be killed on sight. [more inside]
posted by three blind mice at 2:23 AM - 2 comments

May 27

RMS says Windows, OS X, iOS and Android are all malware

Should you trust an internet of proprietary software things? - "Richard Stallman, known for his instrumental role in the creation of Linux, has written an opinion piece arguing that nearly any operating system you might use today can be considered malware, and that goes for popular mobile platforms as well as desktop operating systems." (via; rms previously)
posted by kliuless at 11:42 PM - 37 comments

A world of handmade sound

If you like unusual musical instruments along the lines of those designed and built by microtonalist Harry Partch, or sound sculpture artist Jean Tinguely, for example, you might want to check out the Anarchestra.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:59 PM - 8 comments

Swords Into Plowshares: Military veterans turn to farming

What happens when veterans trade in their combat boots for muck boots? Sara Creech, a surgery nurse during the Iraq War, is part of a growing movement to help vets transition back into civilian life—and find a measure of peace—by going back to the land (NYT, mentions suicide). [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes at 6:17 PM - 8 comments

Fake Science Journalism

“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. I got a call in December last year from a German television reporter named Peter Onneken. He and his collaborator Diana Löbl were working on a documentary film about the junk-science diet industry. They wanted me to help demonstrate just how easy it is to turn bad science into the big headlines behind diet fads. And Onneken wanted to do it gonzo style: Reveal the corruption of the diet research-media complex by taking part.
posted by contrarian at 5:59 PM - 21 comments

Additional props are potato chips, pickles and olives

The New York Times has been around long enough to report on more or less everything, and its First Glimpses feature occasionally dives into the archives to see when some notable thing was mentioned for the very first time. This week, it's cheeseburgers. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 5:55 PM - 23 comments

I'm 9 years old. And I'm an illegal alien.

Alan, Alien
posted by Michele in California at 4:51 PM - 12 comments

♫ "Is he strong? Listen bud, he’s got radioactive blood." ♪

"The Secret History of Ultimate Marvel, the Experiment That Changed Superheroes Forever"
posted by zarq at 3:56 PM - 68 comments

Good evening. Please watch the following very, very carefully...

Every Alfred Hitchcock cameo ever in his own films.
posted by jim in austin at 2:44 PM - 10 comments

Nebraska makes 19

Nebraska is the 19th U.S. state to repeal the death penalty. [more inside]
posted by duffell at 2:21 PM - 37 comments

"But you did a great job of making me feel safe."

hey girl: you can use my shoulder as a rifle stand, as you’re the better shot of the two of us. (feminist mad max tumblr)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 1:32 PM - 149 comments

You won't regret that tattoo.

You won't regret that tattoo. Single link Vimeo. A short, sweet first documentary by Angie Bird, via the Tattoo Historian at Tattoo History Daily. (Somewhat previously on the Tattoo Historian, Dr. Anna Felicity Friedman.)
posted by blue suede stockings at 11:02 AM - 82 comments

And nobody used this for a fantasy novel yet?

So it turns out rather than religious fanatics unused to the freedom found in Holland, New England was actually founded by a bunch of Anglo-Saxon sell swords who had fled the British Isles after the Norman invasion on land given by a grateful byzantine emperor on the north-east coast of the Black Sea. Confused? Intrigued? Let Dr. Caitlin R. Green explain and set out the evidence for the existence of a 11th century New England/Nova Anglia.
posted by MartinWisse at 10:37 AM - 32 comments

"Facebook Messenger defaults to sending a location with all messages."

...the first thing I noticed when I started to write my code was that the latitude and longitude coordinates of the message locations have more than 5 decimal places of precision, making it possible to pinpoint the sender’s location to less than a meter.
Stalking Your Friends with Facebook Messenger
posted by griphus at 10:32 AM - 72 comments

"It’s embarrassing to be such a cliché"

I Was a Proud Non-Breeder. Then I Changed My Mind, by Michelle Goldberg, author of To Breed Or Not To Breed [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 10:21 AM - 145 comments

A Game of Clones: Video Game Litigation Illustrated

Eric Adler of the Adler Vermillion law firm and the Legal Hackers group dives into the odd nuances of copyright laws as applied to video games.
posted by boo_radley at 9:06 AM - 14 comments

A Goode Soop

Cooking In The Archives: recreating recipes from the Early Modern Peroid (1600s-1800s) in a modern kitchen. Not old enough? Then try some authentically medieval recipes.
posted by The Whelk at 8:41 AM - 33 comments

“Although of course you end up becoming yourself.”

The End of the Tour [YouTube] [Trailer]
The End of the Tour is based on the true story of David Lipsky, a Rolling Stone reporter who interviewed legendary author David Foster Wallace for five days in 1996. Lipsky catches up with the author as he’s about to hit the final stop on the book tour for the release of Infinite Jest, then and now considered one of the great novels written in our lifetimes. Over the course of the next few days, the reporter develops a complicated relationship with the icon.
posted by Fizz at 8:23 AM - 32 comments

The Theology of Consensus

The prime appeal of consensus process for forty years has been its promise to be more profoundly democratic than other methods. But let’s face it: the real-world evidence is shaky at best. [more inside]
posted by anotherpanacea at 7:41 AM - 123 comments

A non-guide to avoid awkwardness when greeting human beings

"I've always been fascinated by how human beings move through crowds.

How many millions of minute calculations must our brains be making in order for us to navigate from one end of a packed space to the other?

But despite being the owner of all this incredible processing power, there's still one thing my brain will never be able to figure out...

...one code it will never crack...

HOW DO I GREET PEOPLE IN MY LIFE?"

posted by moody cow at 7:03 AM - 66 comments

Home space ball is blue, and there’s nothing I can do

Space Weird Thing Space Oddity redone, Up Goer Five style
posted by Jeanne at 6:57 AM - 31 comments

On your mark

Hayao Miyazaki's - On Your Mark "In 1994, Hayao Miyazaki took a break from writing the script for Princess Mononoke to work on this music video from Japnese pop duo Chage & Aska" [via]
posted by dhruva at 6:48 AM - 16 comments

The Departed Queen

When amateur chess player Dana Mackenzie sat down against International Master David Pruess in the last round of the 2006 Western States Open, he was outrated by 345 points, making the game a huge mismatch on paper. The game took a strange turn when as early as his sixth move Mackenzie gave up his queen for only a bishop and knight, a preposterous speculative sacrifice that seemed incredibly unlikely to work, especially against a player much more skilled than him. But what his opponent didn't know was that Mackenzie had already practiced this position against his computer a hundred times. [more inside]
posted by dfan at 6:04 AM - 45 comments

R.I.P. Anne Meara

Anne Meara passed away this past weekend at the age of 85. Meara was a remarkable actress and commedian who is known to modern audiences for her work on "King of Queens", "Sex and the City" and, of course, her slightly famous son Ben Stiller. But Meara also laid claim to one of the longest comedy partnerships in the entertainment industry with her husband Jerry Stiller, whom she first met in 1953 and started working with in the early 1960's. Here are some choice clips from five decades back: Highlights from Stiller and Meara on the Ed Sullivan show. Stiller and Meara illustrate how to break up with someone. Audio of their "Last Two People in the World" and "Moments of Truth behind TV Commecials" sketches.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 5:44 AM - 29 comments

Doctoring, Without the Doctor

Nebraska became the 20th state to adopt a law that makes it possible for nurses in a variety of medical fields with most advanced degrees to practice without a doctor’s oversight. Maryland’s governor signed a similar bill into law this month, and eight more states are considering such legislation, according to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Now nurses in Nebraska with a master’s degree or better, known as nurse practitioners, no longer have to get a signed agreement from a doctor to be able to do what their state license allows — order and interpret diagnostic tests, prescribe medications and administer treatments.
posted by wondrous strange snow at 5:33 AM - 49 comments

Let Me Heal: The Opportunity to Preserve Excellence in American Medicine

When I started my first year of residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1998, there were 20 percent more patient admissions per intern in my residency program than there had been just three years earlier. The sheer number and complexity of my patients was nearly overwhelming—and I was worried that at best, they were not getting the care they had a right to expect, and at worst, that they were not safe.
posted by ellieBOA at 4:43 AM - 12 comments

Go Tell It on the Mountain

The last time he hiked to the top of Stone Mountain before embarking on a new life in South America, longtime Atlanta writer and novelist Charles McNair saw a ghost, had a dream and found a new, pure heart in the old mountain.”
posted by ob1quixote at 12:18 AM - 17 comments

May 26

More items from Shaun Tan's federal department of odds and ends

Shaun Tan (previously, twice) is most identified with his distinctly surreal style of 2D still art, but he has also worked in sculpted and animated forms, as seen in his pieces inspired by recently revised stories of the Brothers Grimm, and The Lost Thing, a short film based on his book of the same name.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:38 PM - 4 comments

FIFA officials arrested on corruption charges

FIFA officials, in Zurich for their annual meeting, were arrested this morning by Swiss authorities. They will be extradited to the United States to face charges of wire fraud, racketeering, and money laundering.
posted by thecjm at 9:11 PM - 213 comments

It's true because pictures

(1 + 2 + … + n)2 = (13 + 23 + … + n3) [animated GIF]
(unanimated version)
posted by Wolfdog at 6:19 PM - 48 comments

Now Something for the Ladies: Feminine Pictorialities

Feminine Pictorialities is "British Pathé's classic 'special selection for the ladies' from the 1930s [and] covers bathing and hat fashions, hairstyles, and women's sport." Among the 55 short films from 1934 and 1935: Woollies! Handbags! Cartoon fashions! And my favorite, a forerunner of 100 Years of Beauty (previously), Whirly, Curly Girls! [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes at 6:05 PM - 8 comments

Dog Dancing

In a relatively unknown sport, humans and dogs dance together. Headquartered in Germany, DogDance International says it's a fast-growing dog sport. Enjoy Sandra and Lizzy dancing; she says it's the perfect sport. The 2012 world championship finalists. Two 2014 finalists, and one more with that giant fluffy dog.
posted by stoneweaver at 6:02 PM - 35 comments

Mary Ellen Mark (March 20, 1940 – May 25, 2015)

Documentary photographer Mary Ellen Mark died on May 25, 2015 at the age of 75. Perhaps her most famous project is the documentation of the lives of homeless people in Seattle in the early 1980s, specifically Erin "Tiny" Blackwell, a 13-year-old sex worker. This Life Magazine editorial was then turned into a documentary film called Streetwise in 1984. Mary and her husband, Mark Bell, have more recently followed up with Tiny 30 years later for a successful Kickstarter campaign for a book and film to be released this later this year.
posted by girlmightlive at 5:58 PM - 25 comments

Everything you didn't want to know about Unicode

Unicode is Kind of Insane
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 5:17 PM - 58 comments

"The map began as just a doodle."

In the summer of 1963 Jerry Gretzinger began drawing a map of an imaginary city. You can now use Jerry's Map to zoom in on any of the over 3,200 eight by ten inch panels of the original paper map, executed in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print. This short film by Greg Whitmore takes a fascinating look at the project and the artist's process, which "is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions." [via]
posted by Room 641-A at 5:09 PM - 2 comments

The Real No-Go Zone

"When you imagine France and its scenic countryside, you might think of the picturesque villages, vineyards a plenty and endless rolling green hills to drive through on a blissful summer road trip. But there’s one corner of this scenic country that no one has been allowed to enter for nearly a century, known as the 'Zone Rouge'."
posted by orange swan at 4:46 PM - 31 comments

I’m a woman who writes about rock and roll

"The record store, the guitar shop, and now social media: when it comes to popular music, these places become stages for the display of male prowess. Female expertise, when it appears, is repeatedly dismissed as fraudulent. Every woman who has ever ventured an opinion on popular music could give you some variation (or a hundred) on my school corridor run-in, and becoming a recognized 'expert' (a musician, a critic) will not save you from accusations of fakery." The World Needs Female Rock Critics, by Anwen Crawford for the New Yorker. Discussed in the piece is Jessica Hopper's new collection of essays, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, which has been greeted with glowing praise. Here's an interview she did with Hazlitt: 'Am I Womansplaining To You?' And here she speaks to Meredith Graves of Perfect Pussy: "Being a fangirl is all the qualification you need. And don't wait for anyone to give you permission. They won't. And you should do it anyways." [more inside]
posted by naju at 4:11 PM - 11 comments

"Dylan told us he would call us on Monday."

Bob Dylan sang The Night We Called It a Day on David Letterman's next-to-last Late Show episode. This was the third time he appeared on Letterman show. He played at the 10th Anniversary show in 1992 backed by an all-star band assembled by Dylan fan Paul Shaffer. But perhaps the most significant was in 1984, when Dylan's star was at a low ebb. He played three songs accompanied by LA Latino punk band The Plugz, Don't Stop Talking (Sonny Boy Williamson cover), and two tracks off Dylan's album Infidels, License to Kill and Jokerman. Two videos from the rehearsal also exist, featuring songs Treat Her Right (Roy Head cover) and I Once Knew a Man, which is probably a Dylan original, but nobody knows for sure. New York Magazine's Vulture blog interviewed The Plugz and told the story of the performance.
posted by Kattullus at 3:57 PM - 10 comments

What does one bring to Jupiter's neighborhood?

Well, if you're going to Europa, you definitely want to pack a magnetometer, among other neat tools.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 3:45 PM - 15 comments

Ive Got A Secret

Stephen Fry announces in an exclusive interview that Jony Ive has been promoted to Apple's Chief Design Officer (CDO). Ive becomes the third C-level executive at the company, a step up from his former position as Senior Vice President of Design. Tim Cook followed up on Fry's announcement with a company-wide email detailing all of the changes to the management structure of the design department.
posted by fairmettle at 3:29 PM - 24 comments

No wood in the wood stock

Sony's 2011 contract with Spotify has leaked. The Verge's calculations have Sony making a pretty sizable sum off the deal, without much of it trickling down to artists. Meanwhile, Sony has begun pulling all of its artists' music from Soundcloud. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue at 3:21 PM - 14 comments

“It’s disheartening. They should have known better.”

Loaded with Lead. America has an estimated 10,000 gun ranges and 40 million annual recreational shooters. But when guns are fired with lead-based ammunition, they spread a toxin: lead vapor and dust. A year-long Seattle Times investigation shows that due to poor ventilation and contact with lead-coated surfaces, thousands of workers, shooters and their family members have been contaminated and been made sick at shooting ranges nationwide. Reckless range owners/operators, unenforced regulations as well as a lack of oversight and inspections are to blame. [more inside]
posted by zarq at 2:40 PM - 75 comments

Like it or not, folks, those things are payloads of history

MeFi's own Jason Scott wants your goddamn AOL CDs. [more inside]
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 2:32 PM - 21 comments

A great place to visit.

How to Say or Pronounce USA Cities
posted by roll truck roll at 2:02 PM - 32 comments

But is it fools' gold?

The Golden Ratio or the Golden Mean is touted as universal principle of mathematics, aesthetics, and architecture. Its natural occurrences are often associated with beauty and health. But naysayers think the Golden Ratio is myth or even a scam. Golden ratio previously and previouslier.
posted by immlass at 1:56 PM - 27 comments

Breaking The Game For Fun And Profit

One Weird Trick to Winning EVE Online - Bitter Vets Hate Him!
posted by Evilspork at 1:29 PM - 28 comments

Hoverboards actually do work on water

Hoverboard inventor breaks world record for flight distance. Catalin Alexandru Duru sets a new world record by flying his homemade hoverboard 276m along Lake Ouareau in Quebec, Canada. [more inside]
posted by NailsTheCat at 12:27 PM - 18 comments

First Federal Monument Honoring LGBT Veterans Dedicated on Memorial Day

The first federally approved monument honoring LGBT veterans in a national cemetery was unveiled and dedicated in a grove at the Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood, Illinois on Memorial Day.
posted by MrJM at 10:49 AM - 38 comments

Who are you?

Answer the following questions in any language(s), formats, or paradigmatic expressions with which you are comfortable. Videographers are available for those most comfortable in physical languages. If you need further support to fully actualize your responses, do not hesitate to ask the Proctor for any materials or mediums you require. When you have finished, virtually or physically attach all answers to this questionnaire.
"Application for the Delegation of First Contact: Questionnaire Part B," a short story by Kathrin Köhler. Additionally: Köhler on the inspirations and influences for this piece.
posted by mixedmetaphors at 10:16 AM - 12 comments

Losing a bet should hurt

After his city's team lost a playoff round, the crowned top mayor in the world puts on a floor show to fulfill the terms of a bet with a rival politician. An alternative link (with possibly marginally better audio) has the mayor explaining why he took this particular approach and allows him to credit the performers. (Warning: Frozen music.)
posted by sardonyx at 8:59 AM - 14 comments

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