What metal(s) do you want in the new coins?
March 9, 2011 12:24 PM   Subscribe

The United States mint is asking for public feedback regarding what kind of metals to put in the next batch of coins. Here is a bit of history of the metal composition of US coins
posted by robbyrobs (111 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 


PURE GALLIUM
posted by Sticherbeast at 12:26 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Adamantium.
posted by nathancaswell at 12:26 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Unobtanium!
posted by Threeway Handshake at 12:26 PM on March 9, 2011 [5 favorites]


Sodium, bayyyyyybee!
posted by Madamina at 12:27 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


I cannot wait until the teabaggers demand gold in everything
posted by banal evil at 12:27 PM on March 9, 2011 [8 favorites]


Byzantium.
posted by yeti at 12:27 PM on March 9, 2011 [4 favorites]


I just want something that'll develop a nice patina.
posted by box at 12:28 PM on March 9, 2011


PANTERA
posted by dismas at 12:28 PM on March 9, 2011 [6 favorites]


Nasturtium. Oh METALs, thought you meant petals.
posted by polymodus at 12:29 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Iron Maiden!
posted by dr_dank at 12:29 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


The United States Mint is not soliciting suggestions or recommendations on specific metallic coinage materials, and any such suggestions or recommendations will not be considered at this time. The United States Mint seeks public comment only on the factors to be considered in the research and evaluation of potential new metallic coinage materials.
It's like "So we're not asking what KIND of metals we should include, but IF WE WERE to include them, what should we consider?" Very coy, US Mint, very coy.
posted by electroboy at 12:29 PM on March 9, 2011 [3 favorites]


Lead. Shaped like candy.
posted by rh at 12:30 PM on March 9, 2011


Electrum! It's like half gold and half silver! Some taverns will not accept it, if your DM is a douche.
posted by Mister_A at 12:31 PM on March 9, 2011 [25 favorites]


Metal composition
posted by Joe Beese at 12:31 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Plastic. Seriously, why not? Make coins out of recycled plastic.
posted by Pastabagel at 12:32 PM on March 9, 2011 [4 favorites]


Anti-zinc, as a hedge against inflation.
posted by Iridic at 12:32 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Londinium!
posted by nooneyouknow at 12:32 PM on March 9, 2011


Transparent aluminum.
posted by Faint of Butt at 12:33 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Gallium? No, Indium.

No, GALLIUM NICKELS AND INDIUM DIMES! Know what happens when you press indium and gallium against each other? Eutecticalizationalism! See: eutectic alloy [YT]

DU! DU! DU! DU! DU! Heavy coinage?

Also: in the USSR they used to get rid of radwaste by spreading it wide: they dribbled it into glass production for beer bottles...
posted by billb at 12:33 PM on March 9, 2011 [4 favorites]


Mercury, of course.
posted by Burhanistan at 12:34 PM on March 9, 2011


PURE GALLIUM

Melts in your mouth, not in your hand (if you have cold hands).
posted by Mister Fabulous at 12:35 PM on March 9, 2011


GOLD PRESSED LATINUM YOU FOOLS
posted by entropicamericana at 12:37 PM on March 9, 2011 [13 favorites]


While not even close to metal, I for one would like to see Fred Durst processed into coins.
posted by Chichibio at 12:38 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Make them out of steel, like all the sub-$1 Canadian coins.
posted by Pruitt-Igoe at 12:38 PM on March 9, 2011


Why do we need coins again? Can't i do everything with my phone?
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 12:38 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


rh: "Lead. Shaped like candy."

China's already got that covered for ya.
posted by symbioid at 12:38 PM on March 9, 2011


Please make only one big huge heavy coin so we can all learn a lesson about sharing.
posted by notmydesk at 12:39 PM on March 9, 2011 [9 favorites]


Metalfilter.
posted by rh at 12:39 PM on March 9, 2011


American coins should be minted from the blood of smaller, lesser coins. That's how we roll here.
posted by Mikey-San at 12:40 PM on March 9, 2011 [4 favorites]


Pastabagel: " Seriously, why not? Make coins out of recycled plastic."

Because coins need to last a long time and be manufactured cheaply. That's the whole reason zinc pennies (and copper pennies before them) are stupid: we lose something like 2 cents on each one.

My proposal: Abolish the penny. Make mostly-zinc dollar coins. Abolish the paper dollar. The mint is happy, the zinc lobby is happy. The Bureau of Printing and Engraving is slightly unhappy maybe, but that's not terrible.
posted by Plutor at 12:41 PM on March 9, 2011 [3 favorites]


How about silk coated with quicksilver? We can grow it right into our bodies and transmit Facebook messages and ads at the same time. Right in the iris. Novus Ordo Seclorum!
posted by effluvia at 12:42 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Depleted uranium. If it was good enough to use in Bosnia and leave it lying around everywhere, so why not for coins?
posted by Zack_Replica at 12:42 PM on March 9, 2011 [3 favorites]


I'd like to see a $10,000 coin made of weapons grade plutonium. When you get too rich you hit critical mass and go thermonuclear.
posted by rocket88 at 12:42 PM on March 9, 2011 [6 favorites]


You know the penny gets a lot of shit but those damned one-cent euro coins are like sequins. I'm always afraid I'm gonna accidentally inhale them.
posted by The Whelk at 12:43 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Ice. So you have to spend it quickly, giving the economy a boost.
posted by notmydesk at 12:43 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Chocolate, with a foil outside.
posted by bondcliff at 12:43 PM on March 9, 2011 [5 favorites]


Little vials of oil.
posted by drezdn at 12:44 PM on March 9, 2011


Orichalcum, obviously, since we're all sinking..
posted by k5.user at 12:44 PM on March 9, 2011


Plutonium - it's time to move to the Röntgen Standard.
posted by zippy at 12:46 PM on March 9, 2011


Black Metal. And all the designs should be done by H. R. Giger.
posted by blaneyphoto at 12:46 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Progressive Symphonic Blackened Death Metal, obviously.
posted by KingEdRa at 12:52 PM on March 9, 2011


Yep, dollars are losing value fast enough that even the modern crap coins they're using are becoming too expensive to make.

At this rate, we're going to have to do away with at least the small coins. Eventually, I think that may extend to all of them. A dollar will not be able to buy enough material to make four quarters, no matter what cheap shit we source.

Not so long ago, everything from the dime on up was made of silver. Even now, those coins are still worth a lot -- you can probably buy about as much with a silver dime today as you could in 1960. A silver dime from back then looks to be worth about $2.65 at today's prices. (note, however, that there was a long period in which silver was very low, because the Treasury was selling off its five billion ounces. During that period, those dimes were very cheap, worth maybe a quarter each.) But even at the height of the selling, they couldn't exactly make dimes that cost 25 cents each.

I dunno, I like the idea of coins that actually have value.
posted by Malor at 12:52 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Make them little tiny sharp throwable ninja stars.
posted by notmydesk at 12:53 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Plutor: " My proposal: Abolish the penny. Make mostly-zinc dollar coins. Abolish the paper dollar. The mint is happy, the zinc lobby is happy. The Bureau of Printing and Engraving is slightly unhappy maybe, but that's not terrible."

I have mixed feelings about getting rid of the penny, but I'm onboard with letting go of one-dollar bills. It's odd that the Mint has been claiming to try and increase circulation of dollar coins, but hasn't made the obvious step of distributing fewer dollar bills.

Also: it was made clear to me by spending time in Canada that in order for dollar coins to take off, we need $2 coins. Five $1 coins feels like way more crap in your pocket than two $2 and a $1.
posted by roll truck roll at 12:53 PM on March 9, 2011


An advanced resin coin would be awesome. It could be a composite metal/plastic. Get rid of all bills less than $20, replace with awesome coins. I never have more than 5 bills per small denomination anyway.
posted by polyhedron at 12:53 PM on March 9, 2011


Magnets. Because understanding how the economy works is as easy as understanding how magnets work.
posted by ardgedee at 12:54 PM on March 9, 2011


kingedra: Opeth!
posted by leviathan3k at 12:55 PM on March 9, 2011


You know, that ain't such a bad idea. If they were made of magnets it'd be way easier to find 'em, anyway.
posted by NoraReed at 12:56 PM on March 9, 2011


I dunno, I like the idea of coins that actually have value.

Making them of a metal that has little use except as money will not help with this.
posted by atrazine at 12:56 PM on March 9, 2011


Programmable matter. Then the end-user can custom-skin them (or, more likely, just download a theme.)
posted by Zed at 12:57 PM on March 9, 2011


(ObJoke). I think they should be made of tears and desperation.

(ObSerious.) Zinc, alone, is bad -- too reactive. It's used to protect steel because it's more reactive than steel, but that combination isn't very good -- witness the 1943 zinc coated steel pennies.

Zinc alloys are better, but fundamentally, for coinage, it's really hard to beat copper-nickle alloys. The problem, of course, is the cost of copper keeps rising.

The real reason for this survey. The problem is that the US Mint has, until this point, kept the mass of nickels and above the same, even when we transitioned from silver to copper. (Why? Coin operated machines.) To do this, you ended up with the clad coins for the dime and quarters -- a copper core, clad with 75% copper/25% nickel.

The penny did become less massive when they migrated to the copper clad zinc they use now, but nobody cared, because it was a penny. If it turns out that mass isn't important, they can replace the copper core with another metal, or strike the whole coin out of cupro-nickle, and save a great deal of money. Indeed, I suspect what they'll aim for is a 50-50 or 25-50 cupro-nickle core and the current 75-25% cladding. Dimes and Quarters could be done with the current alloy at a savings, but the Nickel will need to go to something besides it's current 75-25 alloy -- it's getting close to five cents worth of metal in a nickel.

The problem with the current penny is, well, current. Copper and Zinc are basically two parts of a battery. Add an electrolyte -- say, sodium chloride in water (read, sweat) and you get galvanic corrosion. It's pretty easy to see -- dig through your penny jar and compare 1981 and 1982 pennies. Of course, the easy fix is to just give up on pennies, but that's more a religious argument than anything.
posted by eriko at 12:57 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


...it was made clear to me by spending time in Canada that in order for dollar coins to take off, we need $2 coins.

A twonie is large enough to be useful, at least. Even the loonies are useful in parking meters. The mint keeps making noises about $5 coins too. That may happen, or the bills may go plastic, as Australia has done. Those are very cool bills.

Anyway, if I ran the mint, every coin smaller than a quarter would be removed from circulation.
posted by bonehead at 12:58 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Madamina : Sodium, bayyyyyybee!

Potassium.

Or better: Rubidium.

Where "better" equals "much much worse".
posted by quin at 12:59 PM on March 9, 2011


Just make it candy.
posted by Burhanistan at 1:00 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


(I actually enjoy it when they give me candy instead of near-worthless coins.)
posted by Burhanistan at 1:01 PM on March 9, 2011


Anyway, if I ran the mint, every coin smaller than a quarter would be removed from circulation.

I wonder if anyone's done any research on whether the removal of smaller money denominations affects the prices of goods and services, thus leading to potential long-term currency inflation problems. E.g., if you remove nickels, do "$9.95" prices get bumped to the next dollar value over time? (Thus making lots of things cost more, for no particular reason other than the available currency having changed. Now my dollar doesn't go as far.) .95 sounds better than 1.00, but .75 implies (at least, to me) a drop in quality, instead of simply price. So as a merchant, I might bump up to a nice, round $1 instead, for reasons of psychology.

Either way, fuck pennies and the zinc they rode in on.
posted by Mikey-San at 1:04 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Helium and watch as deflation takes hold.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 1:05 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Dolomite!
posted by annsunny at 1:07 PM on March 9, 2011


Nanomorph mimetic poly-alloy. Liquid metal.
posted by notmydesk at 1:11 PM on March 9, 2011


thus leading to potential long-term currency inflation problems.

Compared to the underlying problem of all those trillions of dollars being flooded into the system, those effects would be invisible. At most, you'd see a bit more 'chunkiness' to the month-to-month figures. Those numbers are already massaged to such an extraordinary degree as to be essentially valueless anyway, and they'd just add yet another fudge factor to get the results they want.
posted by Malor at 1:13 PM on March 9, 2011


I wonder if anyone's done any research on whether the removal of smaller money denominations affects the prices of goods and services, thus leading to potential long-term currency inflation problems.

Both Australia (1989) and New Zealand (1990) have actually removed the penny. NZ has even removed the nickle recently (2006). In all three cases, there's no spike in inflation rates in the year or introduction or the year following that's distingishable from background. The normal busness cycle and debt effects on inflation seem to be very much more important.
posted by bonehead at 1:15 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


According to the inflation calculator, the half-penny was worth more than 10¢ in today's money when it was taken out of circulation.
posted by 1970s Antihero at 1:18 PM on March 9, 2011 [3 favorites]


Heavy metal
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 1:19 PM on March 9, 2011


Isn't part of the problem of $1 coins that coinage is produced by the Mint, while bills are produced by the Bureau of Engraving & Printing, but they are not both directly managed by a single bureaucracy?
posted by rikschell at 1:20 PM on March 9, 2011


I was told by an ex-stripper once that the US will never go to a dollar coin cause then they'd have to pay dancers a living wage.
posted by The Whelk at 1:24 PM on March 9, 2011 [4 favorites]


instead of copper coated zinc like modern pennies, if you make some copper and some zinc, school kids can learn electro-chemistry at home with common coins.
posted by -harlequin- at 1:24 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Aluminium foam, glass, ceramic, plastic, or resin. In any case, please pick something that can be made for much less than the face value of the coin, at least for pennies which go to the landfill anyway. The treasury is not responsible for protecting the livelihood of vending machine operators. Especially if they give them lead time to make changes.
posted by BrotherCaine at 1:25 PM on March 9, 2011


I can't understand why anyone wants $1 coins. Bills are so much easier to manage than coins. I lose coins all the time (admittedly if coins were like $20 I'd probably pay much closer attention, but they'll still fall out of things easier than paper).

Of course, cash is rapidly becoming obsolete for 99% of purchases (even for person-to-person you can do PayPal, etc -- cash is still needed for illegal purchases and non-trackable purchases (not necessarily the same thing)).
posted by wildcrdj at 1:29 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


We need to move to Inter-Stellar-Kredits (ISK).
posted by no1nose at 1:30 PM on March 9, 2011


. E.g., if you remove nickels, do "$9.95" prices get bumped to the next dollar value over time?

No. sometimes prices go down to $9.95, and sometimes they stay the same and sum of all your purchases is rounded down at checkout to the nearest five cents.
Merchants and shoppers are both happy either way.
posted by -harlequin- at 1:30 PM on March 9, 2011


Of course, cash is rapidly becoming obsolete for 99% of purchases

In a few social classes, yes.

In others, no.
posted by The Whelk at 1:32 PM on March 9, 2011 [8 favorites]


I like $2 and $1 coins. I always have more money than I think I have
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 1:39 PM on March 9, 2011


In a few social classes, yes

Fair enough. I should have said "for me".
posted by wildcrdj at 1:43 PM on March 9, 2011


FUCK YEAH BISMUTH



Nobody posted this, even after 74 comments?
posted by parhamr at 1:44 PM on March 9, 2011


I've tried three times and still can't figure out how to even begin giving a shit.
posted by Legomancer at 1:50 PM on March 9, 2011


Melts in your mouth, not in your hand (if you have cold hands).

Demonstration -- melting point 86F / 30C, and safe to play with in your hands. What could be more fun?
posted by Rhomboid at 1:56 PM on March 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


You could use all the metal that's left from turning swords into ploughshares.
posted by longbaugh at 1:59 PM on March 9, 2011


Thermite is the way to go. Penny is iron dust, nickel is aluminum dust, and the quarter is a bit of magnesium to get things going. Trying to remember if I need something else...acid, maybe, to get the mag lit?

Anyway, the economy will be on fire after that.
posted by maxwelton at 1:59 PM on March 9, 2011


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_super_metals

Lulz.
posted by Pickman's Next Top Model at 1:59 PM on March 9, 2011


Metallic Hydrogen
posted by fings at 2:07 PM on March 9, 2011


> if I ran the mint, every coin smaller than a quarter would be removed from circulation.
Amen. Sales tax should also be applied on the price tag (like in the UK) so there are no stupid remainders, and Swedish rounding to the next 25¢.
posted by scruss at 2:09 PM on March 9, 2011


Magnesium. Pyromaniacs are people, too.
posted by kozad at 2:10 PM on March 9, 2011


I can't understand why anyone wants $1 coins.

Businesses want them because you'll spend more, to get rid of said coins. The Feds want coins because bills damage easy.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 2:16 PM on March 9, 2011


I'd actually like to see some kind of smart plastic that would be better suited than metals.
An apple for a blue coin, anybody?
posted by hal_c_on at 2:34 PM on March 9, 2011


Anyway, the economy will be on fire after that.
Larry? Is that you?
posted by roystgnr at 2:42 PM on March 9, 2011


Declare that all pennies are now worth $5.00. Instant stimulus!
posted by Uncle Ira at 3:02 PM on March 9, 2011


I like the idea of replacing it with plastic.

However, I mean replace it with plastic. Government-operated, zero overhead debit cards. No cost for transactions. Get rid of cash entirely.
posted by mullingitover at 3:06 PM on March 9, 2011


Get rid of cash entirely.

It would work, too, if not for those Medellín kids...
posted by chavenet at 3:19 PM on March 9, 2011 [3 favorites]




Also: in the USSR they used to get rid of radwaste by spreading it wide...

I like this idea!

This, and irradiate $100, $500, and $1000 bills.

Since the rich have way more money than I do, it might reduce their reproduction rate.
posted by BlueHorse at 3:32 PM on March 9, 2011


Oh man, that would cause my parents to run off to the woods within the next six months to never be seen again.


Yeah, the wingnuts would definitely split their wigs and run for the hills. However, before we get all excited, let's try to consider any possible drawbacks.
posted by mullingitover at 3:43 PM on March 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Pastabagel: " Seriously, why not? Make coins out of recycled plastic."

Because coins need to last a long time and be manufactured cheaply. That's the whole reason zinc pennies (and copper pennies before them) are stupid: we lose something like 2 cents on each one.


Well, in Japan the one yen (roughly one cent U.S.) coin is made of plastic. Yep, all of em! Totally plastic. I'm sure they last as long as the metal ones, and even if they don't, we've got plenty of raw material that needs recycling.

But screw the penny. Let's get rid of it altogether. Along with one dollar bills. Dollar coins are the way to go. Maybe after a few years of dollar coins being the norm, we can move on to five dollar coins and get rid of the five dollar bill.

But make all the coins plastic. We can phase them in over a decade or so.
posted by zardoz at 3:47 PM on March 9, 2011


As long as there are $1, $2, and $5 pieces, they can make them from dried unicorn poo for all I care.
posted by HumanComplex at 3:52 PM on March 9, 2011


Also: in the USSR they used to get rid of radwaste by spreading it wide...

actually encasing radioactive waste in glass is a pretty good idea. Glass is impervious to most substances ie. doesn't break down, corrode or react. If it was only and alpha/beta emitter and the glass was thick enough it wouldn't even be danegourous in beer bottles. I am not certain but i bet that the beer isn't harmed at all. In fact it might preserve its freshness by a lot. Of course if you used a case as a chair or something it would be danegerous...

BTW the above is mostly a commentary about how many people do not understand the nature of radiation, the different kinds and the dangers it poses. The real dangers with making food containers contimanaited with heavy metals (which is mostly what radwaste is) is heavy metal poisioning not radiation.

BTW I would really like to see the dollar bill go away and maybe even the 5 and move to coins. I would say eliminate everything below the dime. And yea watchign the wingnut gold and silver folks get pant shitting hysteria (psh) would be half the fun.
posted by bartonlong at 4:06 PM on March 9, 2011


Make them out of fiberglass so I don't have to take them out of my pocket before I go through the damned metal detector.

Although, I've had to do some research into fiberglass at work lately and apparently it tends to adsorb water. Then, if you hit it with lightning, the trapped water tends to rapidly vaporize, causing the fiberglass to explode.

Moral of the story, don't get stuck in a thunderstorm if you're carrying fiberglass pennies.
posted by backseatpilot at 4:15 PM on March 9, 2011


> "Please make only one big huge heavy coin so we can all learn a lesson about sharing."

Canada is waaaaaaaay ahead of you. It powers the socialism!
posted by auto-correct at 4:15 PM on March 9, 2011


auto-correct: Ah, Sudbury, amazing what 50 years of industrial pollution will do to a place innit?
posted by Grimgrin at 4:23 PM on March 9, 2011


zardoz: Googling says that 1 yen coins are aluminum?
posted by Pruitt-Igoe at 6:04 PM on March 9, 2011


Hm. Is stainless steel feasible as a coin material? That could be pretty nifty.
posted by NMcCoy at 6:54 PM on March 9, 2011


Take our hopes and dreams, take our tired, our poor, and our huddled masses yearning to be free. Take our rights and freedoms, our joy, and our liberties. Compress them until they form a dark, black lump. Then form that into coins, and allow us to spend the only thing we have of worth until we are literally broken.
posted by blue_beetle at 7:31 PM on March 9, 2011


I think that the $9.95 thing is a total non-issue. Most places have sales tax, right?

The loonie and twonie are great; I rarely carry them around in my pockets, though. Either in a jar at work or in a zipper pocket in my wrinkled black manbag. (Or when my building's laundry was coin op - loonies stacked in rows on a shelf.) It's nice when one happens to be "out of cash" but then finds that they've got enough change to cover a $5-$12 purchase. Or you check how much you have on Friday - hey! $14! - that's a splurge for an ok lunch at the better sushi place.

That's probably a not-insignificant net-plus for small businesses.

That said, unless the plastic coins are as heavy as the metal ones (without being much larger), I'd not be a big fan of plastic coins. Plastic bills? Bring 'em on! I hate getting a handful of grubby dirty smelly paper bills in change. With plastic; spray 'em down with 70% (eth/isoprop)anol and you're good.
posted by porpoise at 9:23 PM on March 9, 2011


I think that the $9.95 thing is a total non-issue. Most places have sales tax, right?

It wasn't a question of actual, total cost change driving anything, but of psychology indirectly driving a pre-tax cost change.

Pun intended, I buy Malor's argument. It seems that until you get to really large numbers, it would simply be noise. By that time, it would be difficult or outright impossible to discern real effects, if there were any at all.
posted by Mikey-San at 10:36 PM on March 9, 2011


Also: in the USSR they used to get rid of radwaste by spreading it wide...

interesting. i worked in a glass factory and sometimes they'd dump some of the hazmat stuff in a big pie of glass for disposal. strange and interesting. that job was a trip.
posted by rainperimeter at 10:58 PM on March 9, 2011


Either way, fuck pennies and the zinc they rode in on.

Back in the day we called em fuck pennies, but now it's $20, same as in town.
posted by krinklyfig at 12:21 AM on March 10, 2011 [1 favorite]


i am now strongly considering requesting a name change so i can be "fuck pennies"
posted by Mikey-San at 12:27 AM on March 10, 2011


bottle caps.
posted by Philby at 3:34 AM on March 10, 2011


Fuck pennies Roman brothel coins for areas thar didn't speak Latin.
posted by The Whelk at 6:09 AM on March 10, 2011


I believe the public had already spoken on the matter.

Eagles $10 247 4/8 grain (16.0 g) pure or 270 grain (17.5 g) standard gold
Half Eagles $5 123 6/8 grain (8.02 g) pure or 135 grain (8.75 g) standard gold
Quarter Eagles $2.50 61 7/8 grain (4.01 g) pure or 67 4/8 grain (4.37 g) standard gold
Dollars or Units $1 371 4/16 grain (24.1 g) pure or 416 grain (27.0 g) standard silver
Half Dollars $0.50 185 10/16 grain (12.0 g) pure or 208 grain (13.5 g) standard silver
Quarter Dollars $0.25 92 13/16 grain (6.01 g) pure or 104 grains (6.74 g) standard silver
Dismes $0.10 37 2/16 grain (2.41 g) pure or 41 3/5 grain (2.70 g) standard silver
Half Dismes $0.05 18 9/16 grain (1.20 g) pure or 20 4/5 grain (1.35 g) standard silver
Cents $0.01 11 pennyweights (17.1 g) of copper
Half Cents $0.005 5 1/2 pennyweights (8.55 g) of copper

I still look for my 1/2 cent of change from my $3.559 in gas and want to hang on to the coin 'till the Eagle grins
posted by rough ashlar at 6:29 AM on March 10, 2011


It wasn't a question of actual, total cost change driving anything, but of psychology indirectly driving a pre-tax cost change.

Pun intended, I buy Malor's argument. It seems that until you get to really large numbers, it would simply be noise. By that time, it would be difficult or outright impossible to discern real effects, if there were any at all.
posted by Mikey-San at 6:36 AM on March 10 [+] [!]


When countries join the Euro prices have to be adjusted since the currency values never line up exactly. In some cases businesses have used this opportunity to markup prices leading to a measurable spurt in inflation. Italy and Slovenia are two examples. (However neither Slovakia nor Estonia seems to have experienced something similar.) However the spurt is temporary. Once prices have found their new level the effect on inflation dies down. Of course if a country is suffering from high inflation such a short term spurt could really accelerate things badly so only do this in economically stable periods.
posted by Catfry at 7:22 AM on March 10, 2011


Sodium, bayyyyyybee!

For that money that's really burning a hole in your pocket?
posted by aught at 7:26 AM on March 10, 2011


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