Louisiana's budget irresponsiblility so bad, it threatens football team
February 13, 2016 12:06 PM   Subscribe

The state of Louisiana is facing a massive budget shortfall. Former governor Bobby Jindal positioned himself for a presidential run by slashing taxes and cutting spending, pinning his fiscal policy on the hopes that oil revenues from the Gulf of Mexico would continue to grow. Those revenues have failed to materialize, leaving the state with a deficit. Since higher education funding is one of the largest components of the state’s discretionary spending, it was one of the hardest areas hit. Louisiana has made deeper cuts to education than any other state, and colleges in Louisiana are receiving 55% less state funding than they did before the recession. The state now finds itself with a gap of $850 million for this year, and more than $2 billion next year. The result has been steeply rising tuition and decreased enrollment. It’s about to get much, much worse.

Last night, in an address to the state, Governor John Bel Edwards warned that the state’s flagship university, LSU, will be unable to pay bills past April 30th, and that the university would shut down unless an emergency session of the legislature approves additional spending. Classes would be cancelled, students would receive grades of “incomplete” for spring semester classes, campus construction projects would stop, and the university might lose its accreditation.

If that’s not enough, Edwards played his ace: the shutdown would render LSU’s student-athletes academically ineligible for fall competition. The LSU Tigers are currently expected to be one of the best teams in the country in 2016, and have the early Heisman frontrunner in RB Leonard Fournette. In the football-mad South, maybe that’s enough to get the attention of the state’s citizens.

As for that presidential run
posted by kevinbelt (61 comments total) 26 users marked this as a favorite
 
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posted by Mitheral at 12:19 PM on February 13, 2016 [2 favorites]


Jindal positioned himself for a presidential run by slashing taxes and cutting spending, pinning his fiscal policy on the hopes that oil revenues from the Gulf of Mexico would continue to grow.

What a polite way to say Jindal is a fucking asshole who fucked the state so hard it's an insult to fucking.
posted by Melismata at 12:24 PM on February 13, 2016 [102 favorites]


Just a reminder that most of LSU's students (who have the most to lose here) were not old enough to vote when Jindal made these cuts.
posted by schmod at 12:25 PM on February 13, 2016 [22 favorites]


Oh, don't worry. I'm sure that the legislature will find some way to keep classes open for football players, if not for anyone else.

Sigh. I am terrified that this is the wave of the future. I mean, it's the wave of the present in a less-extreme form.
posted by ArbitraryAndCapricious at 12:25 PM on February 13, 2016 [6 favorites]


Same as it is everywhere, at every level of discussion regarding education. In high schools, parents get up at arms not when their students' schools are having trouble finding qualified teachers, and then the state adds a new layer of scrutiny on teachers (when the state is already having trouble filling the vacancies at all its schools, urban and rural), but talk about taking Junior out of his sport because his grades suck? Suddenly the parents are taking a serious interest in education, though usually to ask for special consideration for their child.

When educational systems aren't valued, teachers are mocked, educated people are seen as snooty or putting themselves above others, of course it makes sense to threaten college sports. See also: the University of Missouri taking charges of overt racism seriously when the football team took part in the student boycotts.
posted by filthy light thief at 12:26 PM on February 13, 2016 [20 favorites]


So let me get this straight: tuition's been going up, state aid has been slashed, fewer kids are going to state universities, minorities are disproportionally affected, and LSU might shut down altogether.

But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?
posted by chrominance at 12:26 PM on February 13, 2016 [22 favorites]


Worth noting that LSU's Gabriela González is one of the principal scientists, and Louisiana hosts one of the two observatories, of the LIGO project which just upended physics with the gravitational-wave discovery. Weirdly, I've seen zero journalism making this connection; they're all apparently too busy talking about the effect on LSU football.
posted by RogerB at 12:27 PM on February 13, 2016 [59 favorites]


... pinning his fiscal policy on the hopes that oil revenues from the Gulf of Mexico would continue to grow ...

Also: something about putting all your eggs in one basket that is labeled both "finances" and "environmental policies."
posted by filthy light thief at 12:28 PM on February 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


FOOTBALL?

Welcome to the SEC.
posted by edeezy at 12:32 PM on February 13, 2016 [7 favorites]


But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?

Spoken like someone who went to a private university. Yes, public universities are, at this point, sports franchises with a legacy residential education and research program.
posted by pwnguin at 12:40 PM on February 13, 2016 [25 favorites]


LSU does a lot of important scientific work, but yeah, shutting down the football team is what will get everyone's attention. The amusing fact is that the football program is actually self-funding -- it brings money into the university system. But they can't play in the SEC if the university shuts down or loses its accreditation.

The special Legislative session to try and fix this starts today but it's far from clear how it will shake out. Jindal was infamously beholden to his pledge to Grover Norquist to never raise new taxes, ever, but the state's revenue has been slashed by crisis-level low price of oil. (It ain't doing the rest of the economy any good either, what with the oil industry going into hibernation and laying off tens of thousands of people who won't be paying sales or income taxes for awhile either.) Jindal and enough of his buds in the Lege studiously ignored this and robbed Peter to pay Paul instead of fixing the problem so that now we have what is approaching a $2 billion deficit for a state with a population of about 4 million.

Unfortunately, there are still quite a few Norquist-drone twits in the Lege who would rather burn the state down than raise taxes to keep the roads, universities, and hospitals open. It will be very interesting to see whether sanity can prevail in the next few weeks.
posted by Bringer Tom at 12:40 PM on February 13, 2016 [7 favorites]


How Jindal broke the Louisiana economy

Jindal is "delusional"

Jindal previously on Metafilter

Sorry, I have a special hate for these right-wing nutbags (Jindal, Le Page, Walker) who manage to get themselves elected as governor...
posted by Melismata at 12:42 PM on February 13, 2016 [16 favorites]


Absolutely Football is the ace in this. That's not surprising in any way whatsoever. Football and Oil, practically the American way.

Canada also bet heavily on oil and now our dollar is not doing so great. All the conservatives in the Republican and Conservative teams keep clinging to it even though it's clearly the least safe bet now. I wonder when their drum beat will change. I mean, seriously, embrace green energy because it's stable and gives people good paying jobs and we'll work on the climate change thing.

Jindal was a complete and utter garbage fire. To hear him talk about himself when he was running for president was always nauseating. I just hope that this sticks with him for a long, long, long time.
posted by Neronomius at 12:43 PM on February 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


Yes, public universities are, at this point, sports franchises with a legacy residential education and research program.

I don't want to be a dick about this, but there are people reading this who work at public universities, and when you say things like this it devalues not only our own work but the work of the many, many citizens and public officials who support our educational and research missions. The public may not see the university exactly the same way the faculty does -- why would they? -- but the public values having a great state university, not just a great state university football team.
posted by escabeche at 12:45 PM on February 13, 2016 [81 favorites]


But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?

I'm finding it hard to believe that anyone in 2016 could be surprised by this.
posted by octothorpe at 12:47 PM on February 13, 2016 [11 favorites]


Yes, public universities are, at this point, sports franchises with a legacy residential education and research program.

Unlike USC, Miami, Notre Dame, Duke, Stanford, Syracuse...
posted by Etrigan at 12:48 PM on February 13, 2016 [9 favorites]


You have to hit them where they feel it. In the sportsball.
posted by Roger Dodger at 12:49 PM on February 13, 2016 [7 favorites]


I don't want to be a dick about this, but there are people reading this who work at public universities, and when you say things like this it devalues not only our own work but the work of the many, many citizens and public officials who support our educational and research missions.

And as a fellow public university employee, it's clear where administrative priorities lie: "Please leave the office by 4pm today so we can sell your parking space for tonight's game."
posted by pwnguin at 12:53 PM on February 13, 2016 [36 favorites]


Not sure if this is still true, but at one point recently, the highest paid federal employee was the Navy football coach.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 12:53 PM on February 13, 2016 [4 favorites]


In public administration circles this sort of thing is called a "closing the Washington monument" strategy. Threaten popular services first as leverage in negotiations.
posted by shadow vector at 12:55 PM on February 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


In public administration circles this sort of thing is called a "closing the Washington monument" strategy. Threaten popular services first as leverage in negotiations.

With Louisiana's constitution forcing the government to fund public schools and Medicaid there aren't any other cows they can sacrifice little alone wondering if it's sacred.
posted by Talez at 1:05 PM on February 13, 2016 [5 favorites]


Also, the big talk on WWL the last couple of days has been how even if LSU football doesn't shut down, how the very threat has already hurt the team in recruitment because Nick Sabin (and some other lesser SEC coaches) will have this threat queued up for quick play for high-school athletes who might be considering LSU.
posted by Bringer Tom at 1:05 PM on February 13, 2016


Keep in mind that LSU is a R1 institution and has a ton of research going on. Shutting down the campus is mega bad news for not just athletes and students but also a whole research cluster. I imagine that ULL and U of NO are also going to be hit ridiculously hard by this.

Probably good if you are a Chancellor for a rival research institution (or football powerhouse) because you can send your Provosts (and Coaches) down to Baton Rouge to poach talent but this is monumentally bad news for Louisiana and probably a bellweather for some of the creative financing other Republican governors have followed.
posted by vuron at 1:05 PM on February 13, 2016 [6 favorites]


Yes, public universities are, at this point, sports franchises with a legacy residential education and research program.

I work at a public university too. And fuck this lie and the people who use it as an excuse to denigrate higher reeducation.
posted by happyroach at 1:19 PM on February 13, 2016 [16 favorites]


even if LSU football doesn't shut down, how the very threat has already hurt the team in recruitment because Nick Sabin (and some other lesser SEC coaches) will have this threat queued up for quick play for high-school athletes who might be considering LSU.

That's the meta that keeps me coming back for more. It's an I'll wind and all that.

But yea, fuck these people. And I say that as an Alabama alumni and Tide fan. The university, not to mention the state in general, deserves better.
posted by RolandOfEld at 1:20 PM on February 13, 2016


"Not sure if this is still true, but at one point recently, the highest paid federal employee was the Navy football coach." He gets paid 1.7 Mil.

Holy fuck.

But he's not the highest paid federal employee. That honor goes to the head of the TVA at 5.9 million (that number includes bonuses).
posted by el io at 1:34 PM on February 13, 2016


Alaska is in the same economic free fall for the exact same reasons. However, we have no sportsball that might entice the legislature to get off their asses. Good luck LA.
posted by Foam Pants at 1:37 PM on February 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


Disclaimer: I'm an employee at UIUC, although I have nothing to do with financial matters.

Same thing is happening in the state of Illinois. There has been a budget stalemate since before the start of the fiscal year (July), which means none of the state universities have received any funds. Not budget funds. Not state tuition grants (Monetary Aid Program, aka MAP). Not even paying employees' healthcare costs*.

For the University of Illinois this is a loss of ~$600 million across all three campuses, and ~$400 million at the Urbana-Champaign one. Eastern Illinois University just announced layoffs of 200 employees, Chicago State University will not have enough money to finish this semester, and Western Illinois University is in similar trouble. It's likely that the big ones (UIC, UIUC, SIU, and ISU) will survive, but it's dire for the smaller state schools.

As this is Illinois, schools have seen this coming for a long time. At UofI I believe less than 15% of our operating budget (excluding employee benefits) comes from the state. This is the second year I've worked here where we have received almost none of our state funds (the other being 2009). Every single year I've sat through staff meetings where we're told to plan for 5%, 7%, and 10% cuts. Our budget situation is scary, but I can't imagine how terrifying it would be if 60% of our funds came from the state.

[* a lawsuit might have "fixed" this, but there are so many right now it's hard to tell]
posted by sbutler at 1:42 PM on February 13, 2016 [8 favorites]


This is three years old, but I can't think of any massive social forces that would have changed matters: most states' highest paid state employees are football or basketball coaches.
We should spin off the big NCAA sports into a separate system of gladiator academies funded by their respective private leagues, to end the distorting relationship sports have to higher education. Of course, if we did that, legislatures would abandon their institutions of higher learning altogether.
posted by gingerest at 1:45 PM on February 13, 2016 [6 favorites]


Obligatory reminder that state budget cuts generally hit non-flagship schools harder, because they get less research money and less out-of-state tuition. And the non-flagships often educate more students from disadvantaged or nontraditional backgrounds.
posted by ArbitraryAndCapricious at 1:51 PM on February 13, 2016 [21 favorites]


Yes, public universities are, at this point, sports franchises with a legacy residential education and research program.
Not so much in the Northeast, thankfully enough.

Curious that the ideologues should treat the places where ideas are the currency with such contempt.
posted by nothing.especially.clever at 1:59 PM on February 13, 2016


From the first link:
The state government has distributed $229 million more to corporations in tax credits and other incentives than it has taken from corporations since November, according to recent financial documents. Economists expect that to continue through the rest of the budget cycle, with Louisiana ending the year in the negative on corporate tax collections.
How can this be possible (cronyism) and why is it buried in the middle of a newspaper article instead of the focus of a massive protest? The state's corporate tax rate, on average, is literally negative and we wonder why they have a budget crisis? Shouldn't that be the kind of thing that sparks a riot? It would be all so hilarious if it didn't involve a ton of real people getting seriously hurt.
posted by zachlipton at 2:01 PM on February 13, 2016 [15 favorites]


One thing I'm always amused by is how these assholes always manage to get away by claiming they're responsible with money unlike the freewheeling democrats, and that people swallow that up every time. Even here, where the former prime minister (who grossly misrepresented the state of the economy leading to the election, including another bank collapsing) is acting now like he's Miss Responsible Economist 2015.
posted by lmfsilva at 2:02 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


A large amount of those tax credits are in the form of TV/Movie production tax credits and I assume the standard package of basically giving the farm away for free to attract a big employer to your state.

Of course big agribusiness and energy companies are also taking advantage of those juicy yummy tax credits.
posted by vuron at 2:07 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?

In the part of Louisiana I grew up in, church was scheduled around LSU and Saints games because if they made people choose, the church would be empty.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 2:09 PM on February 13, 2016 [5 favorites]


What is interesting is that, as someone else mentioned above, the athletic programs fund themselves at big schools like this. In fact, LSU's athletics program is transferring just over $10M to the school . . . though of course it falls far short of what is needed and is only ~$3M more than it would give over normally.
posted by auggy at 2:15 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


sbutler is entirely right about Illinois, and UIUC, specifically. I also work at UIUC. I heard yesterday that in the unlikely event that the budget impasse is resolved, we shouldn't expect there to be any retroactive funding. If there isn't any retroactive funding, then we have already had approximately a 60% cut to our state funding. So, we're now supposed to "prepare" for anything from a 0% to a 100% cut to next year's state funding as well. In my department, about 90% of our annual budget goes to faculty salaries. And we are actually pretty badly understaffed as it is. So ... yeah. There's not much we can reasonably cut.

Anyway, sbutler, we should grab coffee some time.
posted by Jonathan Livengood at 2:16 PM on February 13, 2016 [2 favorites]


My daughter's all set to start at LSU in the fall. Woohoo...😭
posted by artychoke at 2:17 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


@zachlipton That is how states attract businesses to come set up shop ("economic development"). Then the governors and legislatures can talk about all of the business boosting they are doing even while ignoring that they may be giving far more in incentives than the business provide in benefits.
posted by auggy at 2:18 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


I guess ESPN didn't get the memo. Again.
posted by butterstick at 2:44 PM on February 13, 2016


Just to be clear, I'm not happy or proud that it has come to this. As someone who went to a large public university and got a pretty damn good education, I think it's sad. I mean, if everyone gets incompletes this semester, an entire senior class won't graduate.

But this isn't exactly a new development. States have been cutting higher education budgets since at least when I started paying attention in high school in the mid-90s, but nobody outside the academy has seemed to care. Maybe this is what finally gets people to see what's happening, and to realize that funding education is actually pretty important.
posted by kevinbelt at 3:14 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


Since higher education funding is one of the largest components of the state’s discretionary spending, it was one of the hardest areas hit.
higher education funding is one of the largest components of the state’s discretionary spending
higher education funding is ... discretionary spending

I think I found the problem.
posted by kafziel at 3:45 PM on February 13, 2016 [5 favorites]


"But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?"

You know, 39% of adults nationally, and 27.9% of adults in Louisiana, have college degrees. A smaller percentage than that went to public universities, in the state of Louisiana. The fact is that public colleges are a "special interest" whose fate matters to a minority of the voting adults in your state.

A clear majority of adults in Louisiana are fans of the LSU Tigers. Selling the benefits of a public research university to a voting public, especially one where people are struggling and where most people will see no direct benefit from the system, can be a little abstract and rely a lot on telling people about abstract benefits. "Fucking college football" is a way of getting many more people engaged in the health of the public university system and caring about its contributions to the state. It gives you an entry point to show what football means for tourism dollars (everyone knows SOMEONE who works in hotels, restaurants, bars, etc., who depend on sports event dollars), which gives you an entry point to talk about how SIMILARLY money LSU spends on science brings benefits back to Louisiana in the form of whatever.

But fundamentally college sports takes public universities from a minority voter issue to a majority one, and it'd be foolish to leave that on the table when the universities are fighting for their lives.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 3:50 PM on February 13, 2016 [12 favorites]


When I attended LSU in the late-90s, the main library's book budget was 100% funded from fees collected by the library. LSU's budget issues pre-date Jindal.
posted by LoveHam at 4:13 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


y'all, this is how you raise taxes when your legislature is stocked with oil and gas executives who are considering bankruptcy. "the barrel is worth more than the oil" and all that.

anyone know how to claw back these tax giveaways? Can I sue for damages?

Does anyone have any good ideas on how to charge him with treason? federal court?

The Advocate special report from 2014
posted by eustatic at 4:21 PM on February 13, 2016


2010

2013
posted by eustatic at 4:25 PM on February 13, 2016


But fundamentally college sports takes public universities from a minority voter issue to a majority one, and it'd be foolish to leave that on the table when the universities are fighting for their lives.

I mean, you're totally right, and I don't begrudge university administrators from using every possible tool in their kits to lobby for more funding, especially on the verge of a shutdown. And I'm not completely surprised that of all things, college football might be the thing that actually saves universities due to public outcry.

I guess it's just this: the reason public universities exist is to do research, educate students, and contribute to public knowledge and society in general. The reason public universities exist is NOT college football. And yet college football is now so powerful and so much the public face of higher education that to even conceive of universities without it is impossible. College football controls alumni donations. College football brings in publicity. College football is no longer a fun event that happens to involve colleges; it is the only reason many people have to care about colleges at all. This makes no sense. I understand that it's the reality now, but it doesn't suddenly make me think it's acceptable or logical.
posted by chrominance at 4:41 PM on February 13, 2016 [9 favorites]


I'm a Louisiana native and an LSU alumnus. I went through a bitter time several years when I applied for a position at the university for which I was highly qualified, but didn't even make the interview list. (It was a nasty case of institutional politics.) That's sadly turned out to be a blessing in disguise over the past few years, but it's hard watching the slow death of an institution that is very important to me.
posted by wintermind at 5:30 PM on February 13, 2016


I went to LSU from 04 through 08... (which Katrina happened in) and some things to note (but my knowledge is old ay this point)

There is a state program called TOPS unless it was disbanded that paid tuition for any state school for 4 years provided you had certian test scores, and kept a 2.5 GPA in college. Lots of students use and kept that scholarship.

The Housing prices on campus are seperate funding stream, and the prices are exorbitant compared to local housing prices. There isn't room to raise those prices to make up any shortfall, and people are trying to get off campus as it is.

Football is part of the lifeblood of Baton Rouge. lots of the restraunts, vendors, parking people, ect really depends on football season for tourist money and just the influx of cash.

Graduation is around the first week in may, and this is a problem I have with LSU POLITICS is they are clearly fucking over students. Nobody gets a degree, no one graduates.

After Katrina LSU dragged is feet on accepting transfer students credits and it wasn't until there was significant pushback that LSU accepted transfer credits to allow students from other universities to attend school to graduate. It was infuriating, and petty in at time where students were just trying to get by like everybody else.


I'm really interested in hour it plays out, especially because of illinois current budget insanity, where lots of things are holding on by a tattered thread.
posted by AlexiaSky at 6:22 PM on February 13, 2016


TOPS payments did stop very recently.
posted by AlexiaSky at 6:54 PM on February 13, 2016


Unlike USC, Miami, Notre Dame, Duke, Stanford, Syracuse...

Not true! Stanford is a venture capital fund with a vestigial education program.
posted by MikeKD at 7:44 PM on February 13, 2016 [9 favorites]


But FUCKING COLLEGE FOOTBALL is the "ace," the part that might actually get people to care about any of this? FOOTBALL?

Have y'all even been to Louisiana?

Having been a student there who had to take Louisiana history classes, absolutely nothing about this current situation surprises me.

In the part of Louisiana I grew up in, church was scheduled around LSU and Saints games because if they made people choose, the church would be empty.

Grew up in southern LA but my family lives in Charlotte now. All the churches had Panthers themed sermons.

Even the Unitarians.
posted by bradbane at 7:52 PM on February 13, 2016 [2 favorites]


"So let me get this straight: tuition's been going up, state aid has been slashed, fewer kids are going to state universities, minorities are disproportionally affected, and LSU might shut down altogether."

Basically, less educated citizens, and the death of government socialism.

Louisiana: The new Libertarian paradise!

(You've got gonorrhea!!)
posted by markkraft at 9:32 PM on February 13, 2016


Even the Unitarians.

Wow, that's depressing.

That said, I had a conversation once with a fellow activist on the west coast who turned out to be from Boston, and we both admitted being excited about the Red Sox winning in 2004 after so many years waiting, especially of course the way that they won against New York. And we both questioned why it meant so much to us, and realized at least in part it represented the possibility that the underdog can win - the activist, the rebel _____, the outside candidate, etc.
posted by johnabbe at 11:08 PM on February 13, 2016


Worth noting that LSU's Gabriela González is one of the principal scientists, and Louisiana hosts one of the two observatories, of the LIGO project which just upended physics with the gravitational-wave discovery.

hey, i was just reading this great interview with her: "So in 10 to 15 years, I see bigger facilities that probably would need several countries collaborating to build. I see myself very involved in working in those."
posted by kliuless at 11:42 PM on February 13, 2016


We lived in Minnesota when Tim Pawlenty was governor and it was the same sort of bullshit. Slashing the budget to prevent raising taxes to bolster T-Paw's conservative credentials. Every fee the state could levy was raised and tuition skyrocketed. Spending on inconsequential things like infrastructure maintenance was non-existent. And that worked fine for little Timmy, until the 35-E bridge collapsed and people fucking died.

There's a special place in hell for people like Grover Norquist and every callous and cowardly politician that caved to him.
posted by Ber at 4:53 AM on February 14, 2016 [6 favorites]


Yeah, but T-Paw got out of any responsibility for the 35E collapse. Molnau was the firebreak and he got to triumphantly re-open 35E just in time for the Republican convention.
posted by jadepearl at 5:22 AM on February 14, 2016


Well. Looks like Louisiana has a lock in that coveted #1 Wors Education System in the US position for the next few years. This should handily help them beat out long-time rival Mississippi.

I miss a few things about New Orleans but I sure don't miss the state. The first 25 years of my life were all I'm spending there.
posted by egypturnash at 9:46 PM on February 14, 2016


"Even the Unitarians.

Wow, that's depressing.
"

To be fair, it was about whether or not the Panthers exist.
posted by klangklangston at 9:57 PM on February 14, 2016 [3 favorites]


Plaquemines Parish Public Defenders Office to close after state cuts
"Much of criminal and juvenile dockets will grind to a halt," Robnett told WDSU-TV last week. "At some point this scenario also becomes a clear constitutional violation, the courts will be left in a position of having to decide whether to release those persons in custody whose cases have not been able to proceed."

The Legislature's joint budget committee approved $38 million in state financial cuts, including the $472,000 reduction to state public defender services. Gov. John Bel Edwards has also unilaterally cut an additional $22 million this week -- for a combined $60 million in cuts to state services so far in 2016.
posted by rtha at 11:34 AM on February 16, 2016


Article in today's Salon
posted by Melismata at 12:35 PM on February 16, 2016


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