Doggo in the dictionary
January 10, 2018 5:57 PM   Subscribe

 

They're good posts, Josh.
posted by fizzix at 6:03 PM on January 10 [14 favorites]


What's a pupper? A small doggo.

What's a doggo? A big 'ol pupper.
posted by Mr.Encyclopedia at 6:05 PM on January 10 [22 favorites]


Is pupper going to be added too?

Because if not that is doing me a concern
posted by middleclasstool at 6:07 PM on January 10 [33 favorites]


Can I invest in doggo?
posted by oceanjesse at 6:12 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


Now *I* have a word of the year: hypocoristics
posted by Miko at 6:13 PM on January 10 [20 favorites]


Cf. kiddo
posted by Sys Rq at 6:16 PM on January 10 [3 favorites]


I call my children kiddo, but I tend to call all dogs “dog-head” and all cats “cat-face.” I have no explanation for this behaviour.
posted by Construction Concern at 6:22 PM on January 10 [13 favorites]


I'll stick with my old-school "pooch".
posted by Greg_Ace at 6:24 PM on January 10


Turns out Australian English is perfect for mobile phone usage.
posted by awfurby at 6:45 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


Many wonderful things came up in Merriam-Webster's Twitter thread discussing doggos.

The article refers to this thread but for unfathomable reasons goes off and talks about the word instead.
posted by dilettante at 6:48 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


When I am addressing them directly, I sometimes prefer the more descriptive “pooper dog”.

Are you a good pooper dog? You’s a good pooper dog.
posted by middleclasstool at 6:50 PM on January 10 [5 favorites]


I use 'dogging' just coz it's really easy to say when ur face is all scrunched up from the cuteness
posted by Panthalassa at 6:52 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


literally never heard a person use this term in spoken conversation
posted by indubitable at 7:08 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


Hm, you might want to reconsider using the word dogging (unless of course that's your thing).
posted by awfurby at 7:20 PM on January 10 [5 favorites]


Still holding out for "pupperz" (singular; plural would be "pupperzes", of course).
posted by Halloween Jack at 7:21 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


I use "kitty" for cats, dogs, lizards, and babies/toddlers.
posted by unknowncommand at 7:27 PM on January 10 [7 favorites]


Can I invest in doggo?

Yes
posted by Teegeeack AV Club Secretary at 7:28 PM on January 10


doggo
noun
: a big pupper
posted by Slap*Happy at 7:29 PM on January 10 [8 favorites]


pupper
noun
: a smol doggo
posted by Slap*Happy at 7:31 PM on January 10 [10 favorites]


literally never heard a person use this term in spoken conversation

Nor have I. In fact, I never really noticed it as a written word in wide use until the last few years on the internet.

Same with (what I think are similar internet-isms) "kitteh" and "babby", unless they're pronounced "kitty" and "baby", respectively. I presume they are not intended to be pronounced as such.

I have three dogs. When I address them, I call them "dog" if I'm not using their proper names. Except for the youngest, a small stubborn xolo, whom I call "little bastard".
posted by 2N2222 at 7:34 PM on January 10 [4 favorites]


I have referred to doggos of all sizes as noodles for a long time, at least 20 years. Noodle is short for puppernoodles. And now I see pupper a lot, too.

The only exception is if they are German Shepherds or Dachunds, they are puppernudeln.
posted by oflinkey at 7:43 PM on January 10 [9 favorites]


Thank you Australia, we appreciate it! I can't see a heckin dang doggo without trying not to say "heckin dang doggo" out loud.
posted by bleep at 7:48 PM on January 10 [4 favorites]


I'll assume that "heckin dang" is an American thing...
posted by awfurby at 8:47 PM on January 10


Huh. I've heard Pupper for decades. It's how my FIL refers to all dogs. All doggos are puppers!

I call my Hounds all manner of things, but mostly I call dogs Puppybutt.
posted by MissySedai at 9:08 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


I'll assume that "heckin dang" is an American thing...

Only in the fictive or apocryphal sense.
posted by Greg_Ace at 9:14 PM on January 10


i've never heard anyone in real life say doggo or pupper or most everything else you people in this internet comment thread have said.

but i like it
posted by numaner at 9:22 PM on January 10 [2 favorites]


I use 'dogging' just coz it's really easy to say when ur face is all scrunched up from the cuteness

You are going to want to avoid that in parts of the world that speak British English. 'Dogging' refers to public sex.
posted by axiom at 9:26 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


Same with (what I think are similar internet-isms) "kitteh" and "babby", unless they're pronounced "kitty" and "baby", respectively. I presume they are not intended to be pronounced as such.

Both pretty standard Northern English, no? If Mrs. Slocombe were ever to make do with just the one entendre, I mean.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:06 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


Depending on how they've behaving lately, my two buddies are addressed as either: A) Doggy-man's, or B) Fuck-o's

The latter is reserved for the days they get on the table and eat entire 1/2# boxes of Kerrygold Irish Butter.
posted by sideshow at 10:33 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


I'm Australian and I use it as a noun when talking to dogs, and it comes out in a barely recognisable high pitched squeal anyway, so all in all I think it's pretty easy to disambiguate. I appreciate the concern tho
posted by Panthalassa at 11:35 PM on January 10 [1 favorite]


"Goober" is the best way to refer to doggos.
posted by Cocodrillo at 12:18 AM on January 11 [1 favorite]


I am afraid that I refer to all dogs, mentally, as 'puppily buns'.

How thoroughly the appearance and behavior of the dog affects my brain-to-speech filter determines how much of this phrase actually comes out of my mouth. To date the farthest it has gotten is 'AW PUPPILY', which is just as well, as if the whole phrase ever makes its way forth, a): I will literally die of whatever cuteness causes it, and b): should I survive I will have to divest myself of all personal possessions and join a mendicant order to atone for the shame of it all.

So, as you can see, I don't know whether I hope this ever happens or not.
posted by Rush-That-Speaks at 12:44 AM on January 11 [4 favorites]


Keep it in a meme book from Chronicle Books, like Sniglets. I vote no.
posted by rhizome at 1:06 AM on January 11 [1 favorite]


To me, adding an ‘o’ to express familiarity doesn’t really make a new word, any more than calling Mr Smith ‘Smithy’ is renaming him.
posted by Segundus at 2:05 AM on January 11 [1 favorite]


So are they also considering kitteh? Because if doggo is going in, kitteh better be included.
posted by like_neon at 2:43 AM on January 11 [2 favorites]


I just... Can't. It's just dogs and cats. I can't even kitty and doggie. It's too much when people do this. "Doggo" is a trigger for strong emotions, none of them good.
posted by saysthis at 2:51 AM on January 11


...in parts of the world that speak British English. 'Dogging' refers to public sex.

At least in US literature, for many years, it referred to following persistently; "dogging his footsteps." There was also "bird-dogging," which was what we would probably now call stalking.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 2:52 AM on January 11


I call my children kiddo, but I tend to call all dogs “dog-head” and all cats “cat-face.” I have no explanation for this behaviour.

This is weird, because I call my child "Short Face"
(Her face is normal sized)
posted by Just this guy, y'know at 3:15 AM on January 11


Keep it in a meme book from Chronicle Books, like Sniglets. I vote no.

+1. Too soon; pandering to the internet; 10 yards.
posted by thelonius at 3:25 AM on January 11


If doggo is not chosen that's a heckin' bamboozle!
posted by Splunge at 5:18 AM on January 11 [6 favorites]


I call all dogs bunny, but only when addressing them directly as in Come on, Bunny, let's go for a walk.
posted by (Over) Thinking at 6:12 AM on January 11


To me they are all just pups. Don't let the brevity of this term of endearment belie my level of affection for all the doggos.
posted by achrise at 6:17 AM on January 11


I've never had the teaser of an item on the blue make me say "Oh goody!" out loud, to no one in particular.

Or rather, I hadn't ...
posted by DrAstroZoom at 6:54 AM on January 11 [1 favorite]


I call my cat Monkey (that is not her name).
All dogs are puppies, all cats are kittens. Doggo, pupper, and kitteh are acceptable substitutes on the internet or among close friends.
posted by sandraregina at 7:03 AM on January 11


Said it before and I'll say it again... DOGGO > DOGE.
posted by oneswellfoop at 7:03 AM on January 11


There are subsets of doggos. Corgis are 'corgos', sighthounds (greyhounds, whippets, etc) get called 'noodles', Samoyeds are 'clouds', Great Danes are 'long bois', bully types are 'house hippos', etc. There are also boofers (big dogs) and some who who are thicc (maybe a little pudgy). And don't forget, the eternal enemy of good bois everywhere: STINKING CADES (or cattos, as you like).

In my house we got stuck on the ERMAHGERD meme, so now we have DERGS.
posted by workerant at 8:36 AM on January 11 [2 favorites]


"Doggo" is fine, though never a word I'd use to refer to a dog, which is a "pup," irrespective of age. "Kiddo," on the other hand, sets my every nerve on edge. Is there a written-word equivalent of misophonia? Because reading it is like being repeatedly poked in the eye while undergoing unanaesthetized dental work.
posted by the sobsister at 10:36 AM on January 11 [1 favorite]


At least in US literature, for many years, it referred to following persistently; "dogging his footsteps."

It's me that's been doggin' your shadow
It's me that's been a shadowin' your dog
posted by Segundus at 2:19 PM on January 11


We frequently use “doggo” and “pupper” in our house. My kids are moderately impressed by my h*ckin’ great knowledge of doggo-speak, 9/10, would dad again.
posted by wintermind at 3:50 PM on January 11


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