On our way to Shangri-la-di-da
May 26, 2006 4:44 PM   Subscribe

A recent diet book offers a new, easy, work free way to lose weight. Big surprise. However, the technique and the way it was "discovered" raise some interesting questions. Is it so simple and safe to play at "hacking" the body, and is a physician's self experimentation really entirely trustworthy?
posted by BrodieShadeTree (16 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
He's not a physician.
Not that it matters.
posted by Feral at 4:52 PM on May 26, 2006


AskMe thread.
posted by ND¢ at 4:56 PM on May 26, 2006


That last blog link, "entirely trustworthy," was hyperbolic.
posted by u2604ab at 5:04 PM on May 26, 2006


South Bronx paradise baby!
posted by puke & cry at 5:07 PM on May 26, 2006 [1 favorite]


All diets involve hacking the body. The difference is that this one is counterintuitive, and it also flies in the face of the idea that virtue and common sense (consciously denying the desire to eat, sticking to healthy, nonprocessed foods) lead to thinnness.

The link criticizing it takes issue only with the possible dangers of fructose and canola oil specifically, not the idea of eating tasteless calories to
posted by transona5 at 5:26 PM on May 26, 2006


South Bronx Paradise!

This is just another dumb fad diet, this time based on an interesting idea that may or may not have some truth to it, but likely is just a half-decent placebo. What do you expect when instead of doing any kind of science, you simply spit out a hypothesis and recommend everyone act as if it's been properly tested already?
posted by rxrfrx at 5:57 PM on May 26, 2006


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0399153640/metafilter-20/ref=nosim/

Are we getting kickbacks for this FPP?
posted by knave at 6:05 PM on May 26, 2006


This has happened with all Amazon links on MeFi for a long time now.
posted by Jenga at 6:56 PM on May 26, 2006


you simply spit out a hypothesis and recommend everyone act as if it's been properly tested already?

Welcome to the 21st century America, baby. This is how it's done now. This approach applies to everything... unless it's unpleasant, inconvenient or not good business (like global warming, peak oil, or evolution), and then we insist it's only a theory and that there's no real basis for it.
posted by Tommy Gnosis at 7:30 PM on May 26, 2006


I've lost 25 pounds on the "Eat and Drink Less, Exercise More" diet. I believe it's sold over five copies in the states.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 7:57 PM on May 26, 2006


Previously discussed here, although it didn't have a fancy name then.
posted by caddis at 9:21 PM on May 26, 2006


Just for the record, I did this for two months last year, lost 20 pounds, and have kept it off since. Thanks for the link to the book; I had no idea it'd been released.
posted by jtron at 9:53 PM on May 26, 2006


Is there really a reason to buy the book? Isn't the whole thing that you just swallow some olive oil every day, a couple of hours before lunch?
posted by bingo at 9:56 PM on May 26, 2006


Sssshhhhhhhh!
posted by caddis at 10:34 PM on May 26, 2006


"Is there really a reason to buy the book? Isn't the whole thing that you just swallow some olive oil every day, a couple of hours before lunch?

Essentially, yes (actually after lunch is better), but I've just finished the book and it's quite an interesting read. There are some interesting sections on Roberts' theories behind America's obesity epidemic, recommendations of what else you can do (being an adventurous eater is good, apparently) and an appendix about some of the research scientists that got Roberts thinking. He's also fairly candid. My main concern is that almost all of the positive feedback seems to have come from people that have being on the diet for a matter of weeks - I'd like to hear more long-term stories.

That said I am giving it a go, and as of three days I can definitely vouch for a dramatic reduction in appetite. I'm using sucrose in hot water rather than the oil, but if I see the right kind of oil I'll probably give it a whirl.

This answer in the Ask MeFi thread completely misses the point:

"At best, it's just a appetite-regulation method that may or may not work. That's not really too good to be true. You're still going to be reducing calories as a means of losing weight."

Sure, you lose weight by consuming fewer calories, but the "too good to be true" part is that you forego the hunger associated with eating less.
posted by nthdegx at 3:43 AM on May 27, 2006


I went on the South Beach diet 2 years ago & lost 50 pounds, which I've kept off & remained at my ideal weight. Now I just avoid sugar & eat more whole grains.
posted by mike3k at 6:38 PM on May 27, 2006


« Older Kissinger told China communist takeover in Vietnam...   |   Even monkeys fall from trees! Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments