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Death and Taxes
May 28, 2012 4:39 AM   Subscribe


 
I have to say, I think the concept of an apocalypse kind of negates the tax implications.
Unless it's a zombie uprising and we can live with the zombies doing drudge work.
Perhaps with some kind of control collars.
Like Fido.

I can't believe zombies are worth $5 billion
posted by Mezentian at 4:51 AM on May 28, 2012


Man what the hell I woke up at like 4:40 with the thought rattling around my head that I am totally dead in a zombie apocalypse. Then I pick up my phone for some internet distracting and I get THIS.
posted by egypturnash at 5:03 AM on May 28, 2012


The footnotes! Don't skip the footnotes...
posted by robcorr at 5:23 AM on May 28, 2012


The legal system could probably handle it fairly well. In the event of zombification, management of the zombies assets could be assigned to a trustee, given that it would be fairly easy to show in court that being a zombie precludes being competent to handle tax or other financial affairs.

I'd guess that eventually either the laws around estates would be changed to include the undead under the category of deceased, and the property held in trust would be disposed of like any other estate; a cure for the condition is found and individuals then reclaim their property and the courts have to deal with a certain number of lawsuits brought by ex-zombies due to incompetent or corrupt trustees; civilization collapses entirely except for a few grim enclaves of accountants who are responsible for managing all that exists and are permanently at war with a few grim enclaves of tax collectors who are determined that the taxes get paid; or the zombie outbreak is contained and it becomes vital to take fingerprints and dental impressions of the corpses of the infected before incinerating them in order to allow the proper disposal of assets held in trust.
posted by Grimgrin at 6:09 AM on May 28, 2012 [3 favorites]


In this situation, we might need to impose a "buffet rule" to keep the most industrious zombies from excessively consuming our limited supply of brains.
posted by BobbyVan at 7:00 AM on May 28, 2012 [3 favorites]


Keep in mind also the need to charge ex-zombies (should such a thing occur) for the crimes they committed as zombies.

Allowing them to be acquitted on grounds of temporary insanity or somesuch opens a slippery slope, which will allow ANYONE to get away with eating the brains of others without penalty. Kinda puts the Twinkie defense to shame.
posted by JMOZ at 7:17 AM on May 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


I can't help but think that in the event of a zombie apocalypse, the living would be the 1%. It brings a different perspective to OWS.
posted by never used baby shoes at 7:23 AM on May 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


jedicus and I were very pleased to be the ones who broke this story on our blog (previously via Projects) last week.
posted by valkyryn at 7:50 AM on May 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I can't help but think that in the event of a zombie apocalypse, the living would be the 1%. It brings a different perspective to OWS.

Land of the Dead offers an interesting take on inequality and zombies.
posted by BobbyVan at 8:13 AM on May 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


It has been mentioned before that vampires and zombies represent respectively the aristocracy/elite-as-monster and masses-as-monster. Apparently fashions for vampire and zombie films in the US coincide with Democratic and Republican administrations as well.
posted by acb at 8:22 AM on May 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


I can't help but think that in the event of a zombie apocalypse, the living would be the 1%. It brings a different perspective to OWS.

Land of the Dead offers an interesting take on inequality and zombies.


Amen. If there's one thing Romero has done consistently with his zombie movies, it's used them as a metaphor to explore current social issues. That he was so far ahead with his examination of the 1% v 99% concept with Land Of The Dead (2005 is when it came out), and that in that particular film, the "zombies" are learning how to use tools and such to fight those encased in their ivory tower... Prescient is the word, I believe.

If there's one thing the 1% fear, it's that the zombie 99% might discover tools they can use against them and start bringing them to bear en masse. Occupy, it's your move. We need to make it count.
posted by hippybear at 8:37 AM on May 28, 2012


So OWS is made up of zombies? That would explain a lot.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 8:43 AM on May 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Metaphorical zombies, as viewed by the 1%.

Yes, it does explain a lot. About their mindset, and about how aggressive and single-minded the 99% needs to be if the 1% is going to be taken down.
posted by hippybear at 8:56 AM on May 28, 2012


From 10,000 feet 'Zombies' = 'Something has happened to almost all other human beings that makes it OK-- hell, obligatory-- for me to destroy them and go forth to populate a re-emptied world.'

'Zombies' is genocide without the guilt, inspired, I think, by the same thing ultimately responsible for the Rwandan genocide: too many people, too little world.
posted by jamjam at 8:58 AM on May 28, 2012


You guys are waaay too serious for me.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 9:04 AM on May 28, 2012


Also: zombies are pretty great.
posted by brundlefly at 10:13 AM on May 28, 2012


'Zombies' is genocide without the guilt,

I hear what you're saying, in that zombies are instantly de-humanized by most zombie films, which allows for the splatter and gore to be "fun". However, I think you're overlooking another consistent theme in zombie films: the fact that the survivors are usually portrayed as acting in ways very similar to the zombies (if not worse), and the inevitable conversion of several characters to zombies before the story is over.

In my opinion, there is a pretty consistent feel of "we can become them/we are them" in most zombie films that makes a point about how monstrous we are all capable of becoming - which speaks to the genocide idea, but with the touch of personal responsibility. But the splatter porn can be overplayed, absolutely, which can be problematic.
posted by never used baby shoes at 11:10 AM on May 28, 2012


Huh, I always see zombies as the ultimate "other," specifically because we (Americans) don't have the Soviet Union/Red Scare/insert 007's latest bad-guy rogue nation missile salesmen to be The Enemy/Other/Threat consistently anymore.

That said, having just debated this with my two friends from Tokyo over the weekend, I'm not sure that mindset has occurred to people from other cultures/nations, though I suspect it might.

As the Romans said, if there's dissent within the Republic, find a common enemy outside of the Republic and declare war. Nothing brings dissatisfied citizens together like a common goal - especially if it boosts the land wealth and war chests.
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 11:11 AM on May 28, 2012


They are "othered". However, at the same time, the movies all contain a character who is either already infected or becomes infected during the course of the film, creating the problem of what to do with someone who is about to become "other" and demonstrating what a fine line it is between the two states.
posted by never used baby shoes at 11:46 AM on May 28, 2012


In my opinion, there is a pretty consistent feel of "we can become them/we are them" in most zombie films that makes a point about how monstrous we are all capable of becoming

Not to mention the trope of the protagonist's mom/lover/bestie/sibling becoming a zombie, and the protagonist being forced to deal with the consequences of the movie's logic.
posted by Sara C. at 3:38 PM on May 29, 2012


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