Join 3,440 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Homebrewed Christianity Podcast
November 13, 2012 6:40 PM   Subscribe

For those tired of watered-down, light-beer theology...Check out the Homebrewed Christianity Podcast, started by process-theologians Trip Fuller and Chad Crawford. Today's podcast interviews Old-Testament scholar Walter Brueggemann. The highlight is the lightning round finale (starts at ~61 min) where Walter gives rapid thoughts on such topics such as religious pluralism, ecological crises, immigration, homosexuality, economics, empire, and his favorite Bible story for his grandchildren. Also this week, a conversation with Barry Taylor (ACDC Sound Engineer, Episcopal Priest, and philosopher).
posted by womprat78 (12 comments total) 23 users marked this as a favorite

 
Neat. The Brueggemann hisself! You get points for just posting this - looks like a promising website. Another episode includes an interview with Steve Taylor! Nice!
posted by donaldekelly at 7:01 PM on November 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


This is awesome! Thanks for posting!
posted by DWRoelands at 7:55 PM on November 13, 2012


Do you mean, the AC ϟ DC Sound Engineer?

(Also, Steve Taylor? I might have to listen to that. I Predict 1990 is annual New Years Day listening for me, for personal, arcane reasons.)
posted by hippybear at 8:27 PM on November 13, 2012


Huh, I took a class from Barry at Fuller. Never knew he was a sound engineer.
posted by brenton at 9:20 PM on November 13, 2012


If I want me some homebrew, I'll go get what The Peacock has to say on healthcare. (would ya believe there was over 60 meg of stuff at The Peacock? All of it a unique and special snowflake.)

Or if I want Legal Scholarship mixed in with water conservation and how to spot Commies some Gordon.
posted by rough ashlar at 11:15 PM on November 13, 2012


Calling Fuller and Crawford "process theologians" involves using the latter part of that term in the broadest way possible, i.e., that in some sense all Christians are supposed to be "theologians," people who study God. But they are not "theologians" in the sense that most people mean it, i.e., someone who does academic theology professionally. They've both got their M.Div. degree, which makes them pastors, not academics. Fuller seems to be getting his Ph.D. from Claremont, so he's at least potentially heading that direction. But the idea that these guys are established, influential theological thinkers is incorrect, or at least significantly misleading.

Also, calling someone a "process theologian" is, in many circles, functionally the same as calling them a "heretic." Process theology, at its core, denies the eternality, immutability, and impassivity of God. Fuller seems at least sympathetic to process theology--the Claremont connection is something of a giveaway--and one assumes that Crawford is as well given their connection.

So. If you're looking for progressive, unorthodox, borderline heretical stuff, solidly in the bounds of the liberal theological tradition, knock yourself out. But know that that's what you're getting. So it doesn't surprise me that Rob Bell is talking with these guys, or that Jim Wallace would make an appearance.

I want absolutely nothing to do with any of this.
posted by valkyryn at 5:03 AM on November 14, 2012 [5 favorites]


But know that that's what you're getting.

Awesome!
posted by Miko at 5:43 AM on November 14, 2012 [1 favorite]


So. If you're looking for progressive, unorthodox, borderline heretical stuff, solidly in the bounds of the liberal theological tradition, knock yourself out.

Thank you, I will.
posted by reverend cuttle at 8:19 AM on November 14, 2012 [2 favorites]


Valkyryn, regarding the title "theologian"-- that was my characterization, not theirs (to my knowledge). Point taken. Having listened to their podcast for about a year, I suspect that they would want to be addressed as "theology nerds".
posted by womprat78 at 10:53 AM on November 14, 2012


I suspect that they would want to be addressed as "theology nerds".

I'd say that's entirely accurate. I'm one myself, hence the geeking out about the terminology.
posted by valkyryn at 6:56 PM on November 14, 2012


Valkryn,

Thanks for the detailed info on the folks involved in the podcast. I share your reservations about process theology. My "awesome" remark was just a reaction to knowing it's there. I read guys like Bell because I want to understand their arguments even though I think they're wrong. :)
posted by DWRoelands at 8:23 AM on November 15, 2012


"Both heresy and schism, in the modern sense of the words, are sins that the Scripture knows nothing of, but were invented merely to deprive mankind of the benefit of private judgment and liberty of conscience." John Wesley (Explanatory Notes for 1 Cor 11:18)
posted by reverend cuttle at 8:24 AM on December 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


« Older The complete soundtrack to the upcoming movie, The...  |  ESPN NFL Kickoff Stuffs As Man... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments