It's interesting seeing the original direction for TDKR
December 7, 2012 7:36 PM   Subscribe

BANE OUTTAKES. Contains TDKR spoilers, but also fiber.
posted by Sticherbeast (58 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is quite good. Especially the stadium scene.
posted by zippy at 7:59 PM on December 7, 2012


Wait, those weren't from the version I saw in the Theater?
posted by blue_beetle at 8:04 PM on December 7, 2012


I liked that a lot more than I expected. Bravo.
posted by Sandor Clegane at 8:06 PM on December 7, 2012


The fiber rises!
posted by mediated self at 8:14 PM on December 7, 2012


"This isn't a caaaaaaaaaaar!" Still laughing.
posted by PipRuss at 8:15 PM on December 7, 2012 [11 favorites]


Holy shit.
posted by Existential Dread at 8:41 PM on December 7, 2012


It's still so odd to see Ted Morgan from The Henderson Kids and Owen from Torchwood together.

So, so odd.
posted by Mezentian at 8:42 PM on December 7, 2012 [3 favorites]


Okay, that got seriously good around "This isn't a caaaaaaaaaaar!", but they kept up the thematic joke and I am glad I am alone in the office.
posted by Mezentian at 8:45 PM on December 7, 2012 [1 favorite]


That was pretty great.

Also, try saying some Bane lines in the voice of Vincent Price ala` the Simpsons. You'll thank me.
posted by codacorolla at 8:56 PM on December 7, 2012


I remember thinking at the time TDKR came out that Bane would end up being comedy gold for YouTube redubbers. It turns out that I was not wrong!

Also, this really served to underscore what a disappointingly self-serious movie TDKR wound up being. I hope that the next filmmaking team that takes on Batman remembers that the character is supposed to be fun and weird and pulpy and quasi-fantastical, because he's really kind of dull in the Nolan films.
posted by Strange Interlude at 8:56 PM on December 7, 2012 [7 favorites]


Question: How did Bruce Wayne get back Gotham after his stint in the suspiciously well-fed prison in like Azerbaijan?

Question: How was Bane's plan supposed to work, exactly?

Question: Why was the most complex and interesting part of the story - the transformation of Gotham City into the People's Republic Of Heavy Handed Historical Metaphors done in a montage?

Question: Why isn't Anne Hathaway's Selena Kyle in every scene and why isn't this movie just her and Bruce Wayne facing off like Charade or To Catch A Thief?
posted by The Whelk at 9:14 PM on December 7, 2012 [14 favorites]


Also DANCING
posted by The Whelk at 9:15 PM on December 7, 2012 [2 favorites]


I'm sad there was Pony instead of Dancing In The Street.
Bane seems more like the kind of guy that'd get down to that and move like Jagger.
But Ponies make about as much sense as TDKR.
posted by Mezentian at 9:18 PM on December 7, 2012


TDKR: trying to be all things to all people, and ended up being very little to most.
posted by blue_beetle at 9:24 PM on December 7, 2012


Strange Interlude: "Also, this really served to underscore what a disappointingly self-serious movie TDKR wound up being. I hope that the next filmmaking team that takes on Batman remembers that the character is supposed to be fun and weird and pulpy and quasi-fantastical, because he's really kind of dull in the Nolan films."

I definitely agree. Although they have a certain kind of b-movie dumbness at times, which is pretty jarring when they're papered over with Nolan grimness. The climax of TDKR feels at times like a deadly serious version of the "Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb!" scene in the 1966 Batman: The Movie.
posted by brundlefly at 9:25 PM on December 7, 2012 [7 favorites]


I will say this, the action scenes where imaginative and well-shot and constructed, it's just nothing connecting them made a lick of sense.
posted by The Whelk at 9:29 PM on December 7, 2012 [1 favorite]


Bane's got the moves
posted by The Whelk at 9:33 PM on December 7, 2012


That was amazingly well done! The sound syncing is perfect, and they managed to do his voice really well.
posted by spiderskull at 9:45 PM on December 7, 2012


This Bane's obsession with his diet is not a more ridiculous motive than Movie Bane's.
posted by Rustic Etruscan at 9:46 PM on December 7, 2012 [2 favorites]


The sound syncing is perfect, and they managed to do his voice really well.

I know, I could understand it all. Well, almost all of it, which is one-up on the movie.
posted by Mezentian at 9:49 PM on December 7, 2012 [1 favorite]


This Bane's obsession with his diet is not a more ridiculous motive than Movie Bane's.

So very true. In fact, Dietary Physician Bane makes more sense than most other characters in TDKR.
posted by Foci for Analysis at 9:57 PM on December 7, 2012


I hope that the next filmmaking team that takes on Batman remembers that the character is supposed to be fun and weird and pulpy and quasi-fantastical, because he's really kind of dull in the Nolan films.

The argument about how serious Batman should be is the "what color was Jesus" of superhero fandom; everyone has an opinion, each equally valid or worthless. Personally, I lean towards the BtAS interpretation of the man: Serious, but not entirely without humor. Which is not to say that Batman stories should not be far-out and occasionally ridiculous; they should be completely over-the-top. Batman himself, in my opinion, works best as the straight-man through whom we can view the comic's real stars: The completely madcap city of Gotham and the bizarre collection of miscreants who reside therein.
posted by Parasite Unseen at 10:01 PM on December 7, 2012 [11 favorites]


Dream logic: The villains are constantly escaping Arkham Asylum because the real madhouse is the city.
posted by Rustic Etruscan at 10:08 PM on December 7, 2012 [1 favorite]


Ah, yes, Bane. The warrior of the wasteland. The Ayatollah of Rock'n'Rolla.
posted by Nomyte at 10:26 PM on December 7, 2012


Question: How did Bruce Wayne get back Gotham after his stint in the suspiciously well-fed prison in like Azerbaijan?

Are you an accountant?
posted by sevenyearlurk at 10:39 PM on December 7, 2012


C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER!

Consider me slain.
posted by Purposeful Grimace at 10:45 PM on December 7, 2012


A Simple Chart That Explains Why Batman Would Have a Short Career
posted by Mezentian at 10:49 PM on December 7, 2012


Question: Why was the most complex and interesting part of the story - the transformation of Gotham City into the People's Republic Of Heavy Handed Historical Metaphors done in a montage?

Agreed.

The film would have been much better with Bane cutting off the city at the very beginning and for the next 3 hours Batman has to fight his way through, one lunatic at a time, while the neo-Marxists with their neon mohawks hunt the city for that loathed billionaire Bruce Wayne who, in his excesses, has become the widely despised mascot for the worthless 1 percent.
posted by honestcoyote at 11:33 PM on December 7, 2012 [7 favorites]


I vote TDKR be stricken from the record, and honestcoyote's version be made (or remixed).

I would like to see Bane rapping, and the Batmobile still playing thumping choons if at all possible.
Also, Christopher Judge should have a bigger role. Indeed.

And maybe Catwoman could have a point? Something other than being Bruce Wayne's prize.
posted by Mezentian at 11:40 PM on December 7, 2012


Ever since the first trailer, whenever I hear Bane I think, "We named the dog Batman" and "I'll take anarcho-syndicalism for $200, Alex."
posted by stavrogin at 11:47 PM on December 7, 2012 [3 favorites]


The argument about how serious Batman should be is the "what color was Jesus" of superhero fandom; everyone has an opinion, each equally valid or worthless.
Absolutely. There have just been so many interpretations of Batman's personality and the seriousness of his world - even just within the canon comics, which is just a little sliver of the whole Batman oeuvre. How serious Batman is or how realistic/serious/whatever his world is has never ever been a solid thing. Personally, I find something to like in just about all of the takes on Batman I've experienced (except maybe Kevin Smith's take, but that had more problems than just his writing of the main character - and I will put up a half-hearted defense of large chunks of Schumacher's Batman & Robin if pressed, so that's saying something). Batman '66 was just as true to the character as the Nolan trilogy, and Superfriends was just as true to the character as BTAS.

(For reals, though: Batman: The Brave and the Bold Batman is totally the best.)
posted by jason_steakums at 11:51 PM on December 7, 2012 [1 favorite]


The argument about how serious Batman should be is the "what color was Jesus" of superhero fandom; everyone has an opinion, each equally valid or worthless.

Adam West's Batman is the only essential. Exactly the kind of thing a seven year old would take seriously, but a nine year old would find stupid, and then an eleven year old could see the humor in. At least, it worked that way for me. And I've never been able to take tough-guys-in-capes-tights-etc seriously since.

Buckaroo Banzai is the only truly effective movie super hero.
posted by philip-random at 12:13 AM on December 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


"You Suck Bain!"

"Who Said That??"

I like this movie much more than the other one.
posted by mannequito at 12:20 AM on December 8, 2012 [6 favorites]


jason_steakums got here before me, but here's what they have to say on The Brave and The Bold:

Batman's rich history allows him to be interpreted in a multitude of ways. To be sure, this is a lighter incarnation, but it's certainly no less valid or true to the character's roots as the tortured avenger crying out for mommy and daddy.
posted by zoo at 1:36 AM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Movies like TDKR always have to thread the suspension-of-disbelief needle very carefully. If you start doing blatantly lazy things that aren't apparently practical even in the universe you've crafted for your viewers, they'll roll their eyes and hate you for it.

That began precisely at the stock market scene for me, followed by the "digitally-induced ruin" of Wayne Enterprises that followed. What an idiotic concept and premise and lazy bit of storytelling to allow the villains access to Batman's toys.

It wasn't made any better when megalomaniacal crazy person wished to destroy the city with über bomb that he commands his (motivated-exactly-how?) goons to play a truck-based shell game with.

Bleh.

I much preferred The Dark Knight, because Heath Ledger's psychotic villainous Joker was simply that: a psychotic asshole terrorist who enjoyed making trouble. No heavy-handed preaching, just plain being awful for shits and giggles.

This was absolutely hilarious, by the way. It's so well done that it actually requires LESS suspension-of-disbelief than the actual movie.
posted by disillusioned at 3:01 AM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


I vote TDKR be stricken from the record, and honestcoyote's version be made (or remixed).

Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb.

-Christopher Nolan
posted by ShutterBun at 4:22 AM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


That began precisely at the stock market scene for me, followed by the "digitally-induced ruin" of Wayne Enterprises that followed. What an idiotic concept and premise and lazy bit of storytelling to allow the villains access to Batman's toys.

Not as bad as "I invented a device that will produce cheap clean power, but I won't release it because it could be turned into a nuclear bomb with a lower yield than the 10,000 nuclear fission devices already kicking around the country; so I left it completely assembled and operational despite the fact that I'm not actually using it to power anything and I think it will destroy the city and the world if it falls into the wrong hands".
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 4:29 AM on December 8, 2012 [6 favorites]


I could watch full length movie version of this.
posted by orme at 5:39 AM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Question: Why does Bruce Wayne keep his mother's pearls in a safe in the Wayne Manor indoor archery range?
posted by straight at 9:23 AM on December 8, 2012


That observation is stolen from the Quarter To Three movie podcast which always begins with a summary highlighting the absurdities of the week's movie by Kelly Wand. His synopsis for Dark Knight Rises is particularly funny and begins about 10 minutes into the podcast.

"Gotham wins 6-0!"
posted by straight at 9:26 AM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


There have just been so many interpretations of Batman's personality and the seriousness of his world - even just within the canon comics, which is just a little sliver of the whole Batman oeuvre.

At this point, I think the debate between Campy-Batman and Grim-Batman is academic. The thing that annoyed me about the Nolan movies is how they reduced Batman -- who is typically presented as something of an all-purpose renaissance man in the Doc Savage mold -- to basically just a sullen trust-fund kid, who took some ninja lessons, and happened to have a bunch of discarded military prototypes in a basement somewhere, which he spent an afternoon spray-painting black. I never got the sense that the Nolan Batman had really put any particular amount of personal work into being Batman, just a lot of money and lucky family connections. In their own way, I think the Nolan movies got the character about as wrong as the Schumacher ones, just in the opposite tonal direction.
posted by Strange Interlude at 9:30 AM on December 8, 2012


I enjoyed this, there was something so jovial about Bane that I thought went well with how terrifying he was as a legend until, well, they took away his legend for a twist at the end and gave it to someone else making him far less compelling.

derail

Someone on Mefi once made a comparison between how Tony Stark used his magic generator in Avengers to how Bruce Wayne uses it in TDKR and I found that to be a pretty good example of why I am far more compelled by the Bat(at least the Nolan version) than I am by Ironman. Stark uses his to power a pretty obvious vanity project, the big tower with his name on it. Wayne uses his to power the city, perhaps the world if developed properly. Stark is either too naive or too arrogant to consider the fact that it's probably be pretty easy to trace those power lines back to the source and steal it. Wayne builds his with a killswitch.

I think it probably comes down to upbringing and personalities. Stark is living in his genius inventor dad's shadow. Wayne is living in his philanthropist father's shadow. Stark is optimistic (obviously everything works out, I am great) Wayne is a pessimist (this could all go wrong anytime)

Stark is his own statue, holding himself up above everyone, look how wonderful I am.
Wayne's statue is an anonymous masked vigilante erected after he's dead.

I kind of hate the fact that Nolan didn't leave more ambiguity as to whether or not Wayne actually did survive. I am more compelled by the idea of the hero not exactly winning at the end. For me the top never stops spinning. I see the glass as half-empty so when Stark tells me he can make it fill itself I'm just like, yeah, okay Tony, whatever man you're not living in the real world.

And when they tell me Batman is dead, well, at least I know he did the best that he could and that's enough for me because hey, he's just a guy you know?

/derail
posted by M Edward at 9:52 AM on December 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


I will put up a half-hearted defense of large chunks of Schumacher's Batman & Robin if pressed

Chris Sims, professional batmanologist, makes an entertaining (if not persuasive) case for Batman & Robin being the best of the 90's Batman movies.
posted by straight at 9:52 AM on December 8, 2012


I usually hate dubs because the fans' voices are worse than the original actors, but with "wub wub" Batman and "incomprehensible" Bane this dub is marginally better than the original re voice acting.
posted by ersatz at 9:53 AM on December 8, 2012


I kind of hate the fact that Nolan didn't leave more ambiguity as to whether or not Wayne actually did survive.

Alfred specifically says that his habit is to go to Europe, sit at a cafe, and imagine that he's seen Bruce Wayne sitting with an attractive woman at another table. Like maybe that nice waitress that was at the manor for the Harvey Dent ceremony.
posted by straight at 9:55 AM on December 8, 2012


straight - yeah, but ask anyone on the street and they will tell you, yeah he's alive, he married catwoman. At least with Inception more people tend to be undecided.
posted by M Edward at 9:58 AM on December 8, 2012


and holy crap there's actually a "senior batmanologist?" i am in the wrong industry
posted by M Edward at 10:01 AM on December 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


I think the wonderful thing about Bane - or at least that "drunk Patrick Stewart locked in a cupboard" voice that Tom Hardy does for him - is that he seems to be having so much fun. He's the most cheerful and avuncular of super villains.

You can sort of imagine him getting up to all sorts of jolly shenanigans, just because.
posted by lucien_reeve at 2:10 PM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


Youtube wormholes: I came for the Bane out takes, I stayed for "Dog peeing on electric fence."
posted by Trochanter at 3:35 PM on December 8, 2012


The inexplicable Batmobile musical choice are what really cracked me up.
posted by koucha at 3:46 PM on December 8, 2012 [2 favorites]


Inexplicable? If you're sixteen in the mid-Nineties and driving alone at night, they're essential.
posted by infinitewindow at 4:08 PM on December 8, 2012 [4 favorites]


The Humungous' voice really changed, but he's got a point about good dietary habits. Max really let himself go.
posted by Smedleyman at 4:24 PM on December 8, 2012


"Not sure about the lettuce. I would have gone with the mixed greeens"
posted by zippy at 4:27 PM on December 8, 2012


Actually, Bane, Gotham City was quite well known for its pizza... in the last movie. I'm... not quite sure what happened since then.
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing at 9:14 PM on December 8, 2012


My Christmas wish; auralnauts recuts/dubs the whole movie with this Bane and Batman. I would watch the shut out of that movie.
posted by [insert clever name here] at 9:47 PM on December 8, 2012 [1 favorite]


If anyone's ever watched "Courage the Cowardly Dog" (I haven't), another Bane comparison has been made to "The Snowman."

I agree with the video creator's opinion that Bane sounds like someone doing an impersonation of someone doing a Sean Connery impersonation.

And I only came across the video after being disappointed that no one still had yet done a satisfying one where Bane footage is dubbed with Darrell Hammond.
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing at 1:58 AM on December 9, 2012


Interesting: Bartley Gorman inspired the Bane voice.
posted by zoo at 11:13 AM on December 10, 2012


"What if I don't eat fiber?"

"It will be exceedingly painful... to poo..."

Oh dear. Honestly, I am about twelve.
posted by lucien_reeve at 2:52 AM on December 14, 2012


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