Barack Obama is the next President of the United States
November 4, 2008 8:00 PM   Subscribe

Attention world: We're back baby! USA! USA! USA! USA!

posted by plexi (1282 comments total) 211 users marked this as a favorite

 
Congrats America. Something right at last!
posted by PeterMcDermott at 8:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


It's morning in America. The nightmare is over.
posted by nudar at 8:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [52 favorites]


Again, Fuck Yes America!
posted by Brittanie at 8:03 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Democracy is coming to the USA!
posted by sy at 8:04 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


If only I could forget Obama's vote to grant immunity to the telecoms who spied on us. Oh well, here's hoping he's actually different than the rest.
posted by jsonic at 8:04 PM on November 4, 2008 [37 favorites]


Halle-friggin-lujah.

Rock on, America.
posted by Rinku at 8:04 PM on November 4, 2008


Finally... Gosh that took forever.
posted by Hicksu at 8:04 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Obama FTW!!!
posted by grefo at 8:04 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


THIS IS GOOD!
posted by Cat Pie Hurts at 8:05 PM on November 4, 2008


America! Fuck yeah!
posted by educatedslacker at 8:05 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


mefi meltdown
posted by b1tr0t at 8:05 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes. We. Did.

Congratulations to us.
posted by fourcheesemac at 8:05 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


omedetou USA \(^_^)/
posted by gomichild at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Ok. That's done. Let's get to work now.
posted by Burhanistan at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [27 favorites]


I'm stunned with joy!
posted by hojoki at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Democracy is coming to the USA

Hopefully not the kind they have in Iraq
posted by b1tr0t at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


so when's he going to come out and speak already
posted by Perplexity at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008


We did it! Congratulations to everyone who played a part in this momentous event in history. We are now back on the road to making a fresh start, to fixing our country.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 8:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


[Guitar Solo!]
posted by Rinku at 8:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


I'm hoping, as a Canadian, that this is where I get to say "you get the government you deserve" as a compliment, not a slight. Cheers.
posted by Dark Messiah at 8:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [26 favorites]


I'm pretty psyched, but I'm not sure the tone of the post is appropriately dignified and multilateral.

Still...this is a wonderful victory.
posted by Miko at 8:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


And can I just say "I told you so?"
posted by fourcheesemac at 8:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


There went the waterworks. I may need to turn the tv off and compose myself.

We really did it. I can't believe it.
posted by empath at 8:09 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I knew someone was eagerly on the submit for this story ala Digg.

MeFi, alas you were good once re: best of web. This post = lame.
posted by gnash at 8:09 PM on November 4, 2008


I hope Obama comes to office with expectations to which he can be held accountable. I'm glad for the change, but Obama has waaay too many blind supporters, and I don't think anyone here will disagree. I hope people will expect something out of this guy other than not be named George W. Bush.
posted by b_thinky at 8:09 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


!!!yay!!!
posted by PigAlien at 8:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This is the best thing that has happened in some time.

Let's get to work.
posted by now i'm piste at 8:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Not to get corny, but I am proud to be an American tonight. It was only 45 years ago that an Irish catholic was considered by many too exotic to be pchief executive (side note: Joe Biden is the first Irish catholic VP. Go Joe!). We've come a long way baby.

(also, maybe Barack will toss Springsteen an ambassadorship or something. Just saying...)
posted by jonmc at 8:11 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


I'll going to wait 2 days to believe this.
posted by mexican at 8:12 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Previously.
posted by swift at 8:12 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


I went out and danced on my lawn. YAY!
posted by FunkyHelix at 8:13 PM on November 4, 2008


god bless america.
posted by fizzix at 8:13 PM on November 4, 2008


Wait, Who?
posted by Balisong at 8:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Signed Sealed and Deeeelivered!
posted by Ber at 8:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


It looks like FL managed to unfuck itself long enough to go Obama. I'm actually proud of my STATE again as well as my country.
posted by photoslob at 8:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


We can be proud to be an American again.
posted by lilkeith07 at 8:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


There's either fireworks or shotgun blasts going on outside.

Is that a good sign?
posted by Balisong at 8:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


U S A U S A S U V S U V!
posted by Floydd at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


[Guitar Solo!]

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


AND THEN THE EWOKS ROCK OUT
posted by middleclasstool at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [64 favorites]


44.

It took us to #44 to do it, but god damn America, we did it: We finally put our hopes before our prejudices.

We have a long way to go, but this is a hell of a start.
posted by caution live frogs at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


It was a creed written into to the founding documents that declared the destiny of a nation.
posted by |n$eCur3 at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Part of me won't believe it until he's sworn in. But there's another part of me where "I Am Truly Fully Licensed Hairstylist" is playing on repeat.

I think I'll let that part win for now.
posted by decagon at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


OBAMA HAS WON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

People screaming out the windows here in Hell's Kitchen, helicopters circling overhead, neighbors opening their doors shaking hands, everybody getting and making calls. HE WON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Neighbors called invited me for drink, I'm having one and then I'm going out to dance in the street!

YAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
posted by nickyskye at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [16 favorites]


w00t! And my state (VA) played a part!
posted by onlyconnect at 8:15 PM on November 4, 2008


And the winner is...plexi!!!
posted by sluglicker at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008


Congratulations, American peeps. This is one of those days when America lives up to its advertising.
posted by pascal at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


One of my neighbors is shooting off fireworks. I'm going out for a handshake and a hug.
posted by peeedro at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


w00t w00t
posted by wangarific at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


As a American who is further left than any national politician has ever been (except maybe former Socialist Bernie Sanders), I have also always been proud of America and proud to be an American. Proud of the ideal, proud of the concept, proud of the promise. That hasn't been easy lately, but I have come to accept that you can be proud of your country and ashamed of your government. I am so glad that we will soon have a leader that I can be proud of -- what he is and what he represents. I won't agree with everything he does, but at least I can respect him.

Thank you so much, to all you MeFites who worked for the campaign -- or worked for any campaign, for that matter -- and thank you to all the foreign MeFites for joining us in excitement and for your well-wishes.

Go stevis!
posted by Rock Steady at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Not to get corny, but I am proud to be an American tonight. It was only 45 years ago that an Irish catholic was considered by many too exotic to be pchief executive (side note: Joe Biden is the first Irish catholic VP. Go Joe!). We've come a long way baby.

(also, maybe Barack will toss Springsteen an ambassadorship or something. Just saying...)
posted by jonmc at 8:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


My old Obama FPPs

Obama forms exploratory committee

Yes, We Can!
posted by empath at 8:17 PM on November 4, 2008


cout << "Hello World\n";
posted by JoeXIII007 at 8:17 PM on November 4, 2008


Yay O'Bama!

Wait ... he's not Irish?
posted by bwg at 8:17 PM on November 4, 2008 [11 favorites]


I knew someone was eagerly on the submit for this story ala Digg.

MeFi, alas you were good once re: best of web. This post = lame.
posted by gnash at 11:09 PM on November 4


I guess you missed this.
posted by MaryDellamorte at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more!
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

posted by The White Hat at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


finally...
posted by HuronBob at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Not to be all Lee Greenwood, but right now I'm so fucking proud to be an American.
posted by lost_cause at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I'm waiting for the phone call from McCain and then I am going to drink some fucking champagne. French champagne. Elitist champagne. Qualified champagne. Humane champagne.
posted by lalochezia at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [11 favorites]


I can't believe it. It's really over. This horrible 8 year nightmare is over. I celebrated with my family, including my mother who voted (for Obama) for the first time since voting for Carter, and when I had a moment alone, I literally wept with joy that I could be proud of my country, the only home I've ever known, again. We really did it. It's really over. I'm not even sure the enormity of this has sunk in yet. Thank you, America, for doing the right thing.
posted by DecemberBoy at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


You had me at "We the people."

Come here and give me a hug, you big, silly, wonderful continent.
posted by Jofus at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [38 favorites]


Newsfilter

.
posted by Balisong at 8:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Well done USA!

watching McCain's concession speech as I type this
posted by goshling at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm at work, so I can't do it here, but I can type it:

FUCK YEAHHHHHHHH!!!

WOOOOOOOT!!!

OBAMAAAAAAAAAAAAA!
posted by zardoz at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008


So this is what it feels like to be proud of my country again. Been a long time...


Feels good. :)
posted by [user was fined for this post] at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Now, the hard part.
posted by basicchannel at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


McCain conceding right now. FUCK YEAH AMERICA except for the assholes booing when McCain mentioned our next President.
posted by caution live frogs at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Long time coming.
posted by warbaby at 8:19 PM on November 4, 2008


I never gave up on you, Florida.
posted by saladin at 8:20 PM on November 4, 2008


I drove nine hours (4.5 each way) to vote in this election; my family thought I was crazy. This is mainly a testament to how stupid I was to miss getting an absentee ballot, but if I hadn't voted this year I would have regretted it for the rest of my life.
posted by gsteff at 8:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


He conceded. It's real.
posted by lalochezia at 8:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Fireworks in my neighborhood, McCain on TV giving a concession speech. I am all smiles. America, fuck yeah! THE PRIDE IS BACK
posted by porn in the woods at 8:20 PM on November 4, 2008


I totally didn't expect tears! woohoo!
posted by troybob at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008


This is great news... for America!
posted by Poolio at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Hey, yanks, you're alright.
posted by Artw at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Yay.
posted by stinkycheese at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008


This concession speech is sweet like delicious sugar tears. Cry it out, Republicans.
posted by Uppity Pigeon #2 at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I said this in the other thread, but:

I feel eight years younger.
posted by Bookhouse at 8:21 PM on November 4, 2008 [18 favorites]


O.K. John McCain just hit one out of the park.
posted by Floydd at 8:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


(This is a good thing)
posted by starman at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2008


We can be good again.
posted by ruwan at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Listen, I have lost all love for John McCain, but that was one classy fucking speech. Well done.....
posted by lattiboy at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2008 [18 favorites]


McCains actually coming over pretty well. Better than his idiot crowd. God he must hate them.
posted by Artw at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2008 [50 favorites]


I am so psyched about this news my head literally asploded. (okay, not literally, but subjectively, it seemed to literally asplode.)

watching mccain's concession speech now.

dang. it was such a total blow out! not only did we just elect the first leader I've personally found even remotely inspiring in years, we elected him BIGGGGG, baby!!!
posted by saulgoodman at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm watching John McCain's concession speech right now, with him calling for reconciliation from his supporters to work with Obama for change. A massive victory for Obama. An unvarnished, absolute, genuine historic day for the USA. Congratulations! From this Brit at least - well done.
I truly look forward to seeing what happens next.
posted by ArkhanJG at 8:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Ahhhh! Yes!
posted by mmahaffie at 8:24 PM on November 4, 2008


This is the first happy news that I have received in several months. I am so happy, that I did just cry.

Congratulations Obama and Biden, and the USA.
posted by SuzySmith at 8:25 PM on November 4, 2008


WIN
posted by ruddhist at 8:25 PM on November 4, 2008


John McCain should concede more often, he's really good at it!
posted by finite at 8:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [71 favorites]


This is literally the happiest day of my life. I just can't express how happy I feel. All the hardship, the enormous burden, it's all lifted. I just turned off the television and I looked over at my wife with a twinkle in my eye, and she had one too. And we made love. For what felt like the first time ever. We made love as true Americans. Not evil world invaders, not unconstitutional Guantanamo Bay / teleco spys, not as institutional racists, but as true blue Americans. I have never felt happier in my life. Change is here. It's finally here. Hope is here! I can feel it in my bones. Things are finally going to change. And not just change, but really change. God bless every one of you.
posted by norabarnacl3 at 8:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [21 favorites]


McCain is really going out with dignity and class - but that crowd is in one fucking ugly mood.
posted by Ber at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Oh, Sarah. This is the best you can hope for.
*wink*
posted by Floydd at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Yes!

This is wonderful. An amazing moment. Obama's election to the presidency gives me a new respect for my country.
posted by jayder at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes. We. Did.

History is right now, so savor it. We are indeed the people we've been waiting for...!
posted by rollbiz at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


So, this is what a mandate feels like? I'm so proud of us, Americans.

I guess my dad's moving to Mexico!
posted by sadiehawkinstein at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


If you're an Obama supporter, some time this week go up to somebody you know supported McCain and, y'know, be a sport. You couldn't win their vote but maybe you can bury hard feelings with a beer or something. It'll make the next four years go a lot more smoothly.
posted by ardgedee at 8:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [31 favorites]


McCain was doing great until the Palin bit. Good concession speech.
posted by podwarrior at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I went to see Leonard Cohen sing here in Toronto this spring. He sang "Democracy is coming to the USA", as people are citing above. The moment he sang those lyrics, the crowd of thousands erupted. It was the night that Obama prevailed in the primaries, and accepted the nomination, and everybody in the room knew it. It means so much to all of us.

Well, there you go. Thanks, America.
posted by bicyclefish at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


And yeah, straight up, I've already been crying...

I can't imagine what's going to happen when Mr. Hope gets up and does his thing.
posted by rollbiz at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2008


I really love John McCain for this speech.

Fuck the Republican party, though.
posted by empath at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [9 favorites]


This is incredible. I am actually crying right now!
posted by radioamy at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


YES!!! THANK YOU AMERICA!

In the days to come, I hope that I no longer have to lie about being American while abroad. I truly believe that America's image will vastly improve, and I will no longer have to keep a list of nationalities and accents to fake being not-American.
posted by Xere at 8:28 PM on November 4, 2008


Sweet, merciful relief. WE DID IT!!!
posted by malocchio at 8:28 PM on November 4, 2008


Dear President Barack Obama,

Please help us fulfill the hopes that inspired our choice.

Thank you,
The Citizens of the United States of America

A beautiful moment in our nation. May this truly be the start of better things for all of us.
posted by batmonkey at 8:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [21 favorites]


Thanks John for the classy concession speech.
posted by birdherder at 8:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Freedom costs a buck o'five.

I love you America.
posted by clearly at 8:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


For a moment tonight I thought that everyone had been wrong and that things would turn out different than this. Virginia was so close, so close, and I know it's going to be a strange day at work tomorrow.
posted by daHIFI at 8:30 PM on November 4, 2008


Seriously, where's this McCain been for the last 8 years?
posted by Artw at 8:30 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


I am in Chicago and they are setting off fireworks in my neighborhood.
posted by lee at 8:30 PM on November 4, 2008


Yay! Telecoms. Hmm.


posted by adamdschneider at 8:30 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Couldn't even muster a hug for his wife?
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?
posted by Floydd at 8:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


That was one classy concession speech. But man, John McCain's crowd was full of douches.

I'm so happy Obama won. Well done, America!
posted by shaka, when the walls fell at 8:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


We can be proud to be an American again.

To rephrase that, Ive been proud to be an American, now we can be proud of our Government.
posted by lilkeith07 at 8:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


There's a huge crowd of people at the white house now.

Please tell me they're going to storm the gates and drag him out.
posted by empath at 8:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [21 favorites]


Excellent speech by McCain. Sorry, still loathe the man but that was classy.
posted by ceri richard at 8:32 PM on November 4, 2008


Good job, America. We did the right thing!
posted by rachaelfaith at 8:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


congratulations america. i'm so proud of you today.

you've made me all teary.
posted by taff at 8:32 PM on November 4, 2008


What is the opposite of

.


?
posted by unSane at 8:33 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


victory lap! VICTORY LAP! VVVIIICCCTTTOOORRRYYYY LLLAAAPPP!!!
posted by mathowie at 8:33 PM on November 4, 2008 [19 favorites]


FUCK. YES.
posted by reality at 8:33 PM on November 4, 2008


Congratulations America, and to all Americans! I got up to take painkillers in the middle of the night, and while I was waiting for them to kick in, the BBC called it for Obama. And now I'm too excited to sleep!

This is just wonderful.
posted by ArmyOfKittens at 8:33 PM on November 4, 2008


FUCK YEAH!
posted by every_one_needs_a_hug_sometimes at 8:34 PM on November 4, 2008


It looks like Obama's coattails weren't long enough for Sean Tevis.
posted by Knappster at 8:34 PM on November 4, 2008


I can like John McCain again, with some reservations. The man does much better in the senate. And I'll be happy to continue to see him working there.
posted by six-or-six-thirty at 8:34 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!
posted by Miss Bitchy Pants at 8:34 PM on November 4, 2008


[>I<>I<>I<>I<]
posted by iamabot at 8:35 PM on November 4, 2008


Wow... watching the McCain concession makes it clear who's really been driving the Straight Talk Express for the last year. McCain's trying to concede with class but, other than cheer at party platitudes, all the crowd can do is jeer at any positive mention of Obama's name or break into chants that don't even make sense. Who knew the swan song of the Republican party would be so damned ugly.
posted by nathan_teske at 8:35 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


"I just turned off the television and I looked over at my wife with a twinkle in my eye, and she had one too. And we made love. For what felt like the first time ever. "

EW.
posted by falameufilho at 8:35 PM on November 4, 2008 [17 favorites]




John showed some class..

and this country now has some hope...

thank you.. for all of you that helped make this happen...
posted by HuronBob at 8:36 PM on November 4, 2008


Obama is lucky that that John McCain didn't turn up for the campaign. If he had, I think it would have been a much tougher fight for the presidency. Classy and generous concession speech from McCain; the crowd, not so much.
posted by ArkhanJG at 8:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


I'm in a bar in Clinton Hill , brooklyn now -- I started in one that was broadcasting fox news on a TV that couldn't get sound (it was the only channel they could get) and I was the first in the place that spotted Fox's "Obama - Elected President" banner and I went APESHIT. Everyone int eh place erupted, I got hugged by one stranger and kissed by another. a number of us went to another bar that acutally COULD get sound so we could hear Obama's acceptance speech, but on the way a lot of people got held up by people standing in teh street and cheering and screeming and waving flags and honking horns. Brooklyn is ABSOLUTELY INSANE right now -- huge crowds and two people waving AMerican flags at cars. I'm sitting in this bar and blogging this right now and waiting for Obama's speech.

I didn't really believe it was real until they got a shot of Jesse JAckson in a crowd someplace, with tears streaming down his cheeks.

I also saw the democrats picked up a seat from a Staten Island congressional district -- my ex had been the democrats deputy campaign manager in the 2006 election, and they lost, so when I saw Fox had called it for the democrats I texted him that "you have been avenged."

They're showing the scene in Times Square now, which is packed and the crowds are going wild. Results are rolling in and people inside are still cheering anew at eacah new result, while the crowd outside is just too happy.

Excuse the typos, I am very very drunk right now. (bows)
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


Praise Allah! Now where are the white women at?
posted by Pollomacho at 8:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [65 favorites]


Two things that amaze me today:

1) We elected Barack Obama!

2) David Gregory is only 38!?
posted by Karlos the Jackal at 8:37 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


If you're an Obama supporter, some time this week go up to somebody you know supported McCain and, y'know, be a sport. You couldn't win their vote but maybe you can bury hard feelings with a beer or something. It'll make the next four years go a lot more smoothly.

Tonight at the bar where I had my after-work beer and shot, I sat next to a McCain supporter. Politics aside, he was a nice guy. We talked about politics without any rancor and ahad a nice discusion about music, too. I never let politics get in the way of basic humanity if I can help it.
posted by jonmc at 8:37 PM on November 4, 2008


So! Much! Yay!
posted by Flipping_Hades_Terwilliger at 8:37 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hellz yeah!

Is it just me, or did McCain look relaxed and...natural for the first time in weeks?
posted by JoanArkham at 8:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


Ah, the party has moved! Ok, will reprint from previous thread, so you get a sense of how hard everyone is partying with you:

I was at opening night of Spamalot in Ottawa tonight,
and when the Knight who formerly said Ni told Arthur what they now are... he broke to a report of the election in "that silly country to the south" for an entire minute, and the entire theatre burst out in applause at the news of Obama's lead.

Arthur, still in character, waiting through the whole thing, replied: "Gosh". :D

Congrats, people. And if you've ever been hassled while traveling overseas, can you imagine how heartily your hands will be shook if you step foot outside your border anytime soon??! Feel it. This is good.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 8:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Now THIS is what I call Morning In America.
posted by smartyboots at 8:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Brings out the champagne, and gently sighs the cork.
posted by Feisty at 8:38 PM on November 4, 2008


My god, I can't believe Florida went Obama. Best bet I ever lost.
posted by casarkos at 8:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I wish there were a '.' for complete joy. In NYC, everyone -- including cabs and police officers -- are beeping in the streets, and everyone is cheering. What a day.
posted by kdar at 8:39 PM on November 4, 2008


I hate to say it, but I'm experiencing a massive amount of shadenfreude as I think about all the racists who didn't vote for Obama solely because of his race.
posted by bwg at 8:39 PM on November 4, 2008


While I've always loved the US, I've never really been able to feel proud of the country like I do now. I'm not sure Obama's going to be SUPER AWESOME PRESIDENT (although if he's as good a policymaker as he is an orator, he could be!) but the fact that he was pretty strongly elected like this, helps to revert some of the negative feelings I've had towards the "average American" and what they care about.

Here's to 4 years of honest to God change.
posted by cyrusdogstar at 8:40 PM on November 4, 2008


WOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!
posted by Severian at 8:40 PM on November 4, 2008


I feel so hopeful, and so anxious for us as a nation to get to work undoing the damages of the last 8 years.
I am confident that Barack Obama will wisely use the mandate that has been given him.

<chase_utley>
President Barack Obama

President Barack Fucking Hussein Obama!
</chase_utley>
posted by bashos_frog at 8:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


August 4th, 2009 is going to be a popular birthday.
posted by anthill at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


<3
posted by jessamyn at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hey mathowie now that Barack has won and America is all better and such, can we have the img tag back now? Because these threads could use some img. BARACK.jpg!
posted by caution live frogs at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


er.... schadenfreude

missed that "c"
posted by bwg at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008


You US mefites have been scaring me with your strong emotions about this guy. Getting teary eyed over pictures and all.
The strength of your feelings must be an indication of how disenfranchised you all have felt.
Today that's over. Enjoy your election party.
posted by jouke at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


I am crying. CRYING. This is such a joyous night. Thank you America! Good going us! Its going to be a fucking BLOWOUT too. Awesome. SO AWESOME!
posted by aacheson at 8:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Also, Marijuana has just been effectively decriminalized in Mass. Also, anti-abortion measures were defeated in both Colorado and South Dakota.

The times: they are a-changin'.
posted by Avenger at 8:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


PUMAs... Suck it!
posted by horsemuth at 8:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thank you, MetaFilter, for the ups and downs during the past few months.
posted by clearly at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


McCain just jumped leagues up in my polls with his concession speech.
posted by Frasermoo at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


Hallelujah!! So this is what pride feels like...

McCain was positively human, composed and eloquent. I guess he does alot better when the stress is off
posted by xena at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


Amazing! We Yanks finally did something right! We have a huge mess to clean up but we're off to a good start. Thanks, everyone who helped make this happen!

Also amazing to realize that in my lifetime we've gone from segregated drinking fountains to electing a black president. I think my head's about to explode in a very good way.
posted by Quietgal at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Yay for us!
posted by Mister_A at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


hooray. even little things have changed right away here. (i just walked to the convenience store in the city.) If youre paying attention. its good for people. HONK HONK !
posted by celerystick at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


<3
posted by jessamyn at 12:41 PM on November 5 [+] [!]

Is that a bum with a party hat?

Kidding! I'm just really happy at the moment, and I'm not even from the US.
posted by bwg at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


My religious beliefs took a fatal blow when Bush was re-elected. They probably won't come back, but I can still say, hallelujah, today. So proud I cast my vote on the right side this election. Here's hoping this is only the beginning of better things.
posted by emjaybee at 8:43 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done USA.

I'm still nervous though - there's no news yet on San Francisco's Proposition R to create the George Bush Sewage Plant. It'll be a long night waiting for that one.....
posted by inflatablekiwi at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Dear McCain: waving your hands in a placating manner at that pack of jackals you incited to such a pitch of hatred will not take one single second off your long stay in whatever purgatorial realm you're headed for next.
posted by fairytale of los angeles at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


Is there an opposite of . here?

!

Yeah. That's it. !
posted by Mikey-San at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]




So, Major County, Oklahoma voted 89% McCain.
Are there any counties that voted for him at a higher percentage?
posted by PHINC at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008


Also: Massachusetts has decriminalized marijuana possession. (!)
posted by unmake at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


I was proud to be a part of this. I hope with all of my heart that it goes a long way toward restoring America to the glory it once had.
posted by banished at 8:44 PM on November 4, 2008


A little choked up here (even though I oughta know better). D.C. is going wild - fireworks, horns, howling from the rooftops for blocks in every direction!
posted by ryanshepard at 8:45 PM on November 4, 2008


Is ! the opposite of . ?
posted by IAmBroom at 8:45 PM on November 4, 2008


Watch out, world--WE'RE BACK!

WooHoo!!!

I was afraid that the day would never come. Eight years of fear. Eight fucking years of being demoralized. Eight LONG years of hearing that if you're not with us, you're with the terrorists.

It's over now and I repeat--WE'RE BACK!
posted by leftcoastbob at 8:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


"AHHHHH-HA-HA-HA-HA! He's dead! It's dead! The Republican beast is fucking dead! Twelve years of that rampaging Republican fucking elephant beast finally brought to its knees! Yes! You're dead, you fucker! You fuck! You fuck! You're dead, dead, dead! We hate you, hate you! Now you do you know it? Now do you feel it? Feel the fucking hate. Feel it! Call off your dogs! Call your little Vietnamese potbelly Rush Limbaugh back to your fold, you demon fuck! Bring Pat Buchanan back! Call him back, you lost!

Finally. The Republican beast elephant, brought to its fucking knees. 'Cause I feel like me and my friends and all the artists in the fucking country were like little Pygmy tribes shooting darts at that elephant for twelve years and finally... do our little pygmy dance... YES!"

-Bill Hicks, RIP
posted by DecemberBoy at 8:46 PM on November 4, 2008 [27 favorites]


I'm not crying. It's raining on my face.
posted by MegoSteve at 8:46 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


@EmpressCallipygos

Yeah, Park Slope is rocking out in pretty much the exact same way. Every television in sight is showing election coverage and there are crowds overflowing from bars and restaurants watching the coverage. People on the street are spontaneously cheering and hugging. I feel like democracy is working properly for the first time in my life.
posted by ben242 at 8:47 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm going to say a few things....

WE WON!!!!! I hope all of our dreams and hopes come true! Obama lead us to the promised land!


As for McCain.....

His concession speech reminded me that he is still an American. His voters did what they thought were best for this country. I am happy for our win but I must salute him and his supporters for doing what they thought was best for this country. I am happy we won but I cannot brag or rub anyone's face in it. It is like when you know you are right but still your opponent put up a fight. They gave their best and for me to be a jerk about things would be an insult to them. You have to respect them. And I for one respect everyone that supported McCain. Happy Obama won!!! As for McCain supporters please don't go all doom and gloom on us. We had faith in Obama. We would not vote this country straight to it's doom. Please have faith in us. Everything will be OK. I promise.

For now I am going to have another Beer and enjoy myself.


:>)
posted by Mastercheddaar at 8:47 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


!
posted by Doktor Zed at 8:47 PM on November 4, 2008


AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 8:47 PM on November 4, 2008


I feel like a born-again American!
posted by lockle at 8:47 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Also, Marijuana has just been effectively decriminalized in Mass. Also, anti-abortion measures were defeated in both Colorado and South Dakota.

The times: they are a-changin'.


*pokes at California to get on the Change Wagon re: Prop 8*

Also, congrats 'murica.
posted by CKmtl at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008


FUCKING FUCK YEAH!!!!!
posted by tylerfulltilt at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008


Nice. I was pessimistic. Nice to see I was wrong.
posted by Dreamcast at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008


I just popped that champagne I was talking about all day.

Here is to you Nevada, here is to you America, and here is to you Barack Obama.

The motherfucking cork did fly over those mountains over there.
posted by clearly at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm amazed that fivethirtyeight.com's final prediction map matches the map on the TV. NC, Missouri and Wisconsin still undeclared.
posted by daHIFI at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008


Getting a bit worried with prop 8 in California (banning gay marriage), but seems selfish to ask for more tonight.
posted by troybob at 8:48 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


America, Fuck Yeah!
posted by drezdn at 8:49 PM on November 4, 2008


am I the only one who thinks <3 looks like a ball sack? seriously, every time I see it...

AMERICA. FUCK YEAH !
posted by Frasermoo at 8:49 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


This is great news to come home to (it's afternoon, my time).

Even better news since I'm going to be taking the test to become a Foreign Service Officer tomorrow at the Tokyo Embassy. Will be nice to work (if I pass...man, if I pass) for an administration that I like. :)
posted by snwod at 8:49 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Lots of folks out yelling and honking in the Bronx.

We're watching Grant Park on CSPAN. I'm all for inclusion, but draw the line at country music.
posted by These Premises Are Alarmed at 8:50 PM on November 4, 2008


USA! USA! USA! USA!

Cut that shit out.

:P
posted by turgid dahlia at 8:50 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This is going to be the longest MeFi thread, ever.

And it should be.
posted by bwg at 8:50 PM on November 4, 2008


What a great night! A great friend said it is the most important night of his life. So true. Welcome to a new America.
posted by octomato at 8:50 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm happy. So, so very happy. It's the New Frontier.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 8:50 PM on November 4, 2008


Good lord, its great to be an American today. It feel good to say that after eight years.
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Even though I was hoping for a democratic victory (2004 would've been better) I'm glad the dems don't have 60 in the senate. I like me a little gridlock.
posted by BrotherCaine at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


drezdn SNAP. you owe me a coke
posted by Frasermoo at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


!
posted by joannemerriam at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


An anti-gun collectivist elected as president. Someone who thinks government is there to provide things for people rather than to preserve freedom and liberty. Another defeat for freedom and liberty. I'm ashamed to be an American today.
posted by JasonM at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Woo-hoo! Let's start on the 2012 re-election campaign!
posted by Balisong at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


These sirens need to become a permanent feature for topics that get a lot of posts.
posted by PercussivePaul at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Helping elect Barack Obama to his first term as U.S. President has been one of the greatest pleasures of my life. A watershed moment.

I'm not hugely surprised I've lived to see this, but I'm really glad I have!
posted by Forrest Greene at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Wisconsin is declared in our hearts.
posted by drezdn at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Yay for ye old U.S.!!! We're AWESOME (again.) My toddler doesn't understand why Mommy is crying and hugging her. I'll explain it to her when she's a little older.
posted by Miastar at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008



posted by zsazsa at 8:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


MSNBC showing the celebration in Obama's father's village in Kenya. They are just a little excited. Before that they had the celebration in Indonesia where he lived for a short period of time. I have never before seen such reaction in other parts of the world to a US election. This feels...wonderful.
posted by Ber at 8:53 PM on November 4, 2008


Gun Owner For Obama!! I'm so happy, I won't even go out and shoot randomly into the air in celebration!
posted by Balisong at 8:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Obama will be the first African American president. Am I wrong to want him to be known, after his term(s), as THE BEST PRESIDENT EVER!?!
posted by paddysat at 8:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hell, yeah. I had to turn the internet off 12 days ago, I was getting so wrapped up in the horse race. Now, it's just Hell yeah! He's just a year older than me -- I've votd for a loser in every presidential election from Reagan '80 until today. I'm not quite sure how to feel, yet.


when do the tribunals start?
posted by Devils Rancher at 8:53 PM on November 4, 2008


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posted by 31d1 at 8:54 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


I knew someone was eagerly on the submit for this story ala Digg.

MeFi, alas you were good once re: best of web. This post = lame.
posted by gnash at 6:09 AM on November 5 [+] [!]


Are you serious? Were you seriously sitting there with Notepad open ready to cut-and-paste that shit into this thread?

Christ, what an asshole.
posted by turgid dahlia at 8:54 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I'm not American, but today, I am SOOO proud to call America my neighbour!

Congratulations America - and WELCOME BACK! This is good for American and good for the world.
posted by SSinVan at 8:55 PM on November 4, 2008


!
posted by Nattie at 8:55 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Connecticut decided not to have a constitutional convention. Amongst other things, that means when gay marriages begin here next Wednesday, there's not much anyone who opposes them can do about it anytime soon.

At this point I'm starting to think if I look out the window? I'll see a whole herd of ponies.
posted by gnomeloaf at 8:55 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


This is amazing.

keeping my eye to the state ballot initiatives, though -- Florida is not looking good with Amendment 2...
posted by lullaby at 8:56 PM on November 4, 2008


It had to be called early. It had to be a clear victory. Now we just need everyone to step back.
posted by drezdn at 8:56 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Rest of the World.
posted by hoskala at 8:56 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


America, we got this one right.
posted by uri at 8:56 PM on November 4, 2008


WOOHOO! And a majority in the house and senate, even the governorships are going for Dems. Time to turn back the clock to a time before "W".
posted by wastelands at 8:56 PM on November 4, 2008


As a permanent guest in the US, I've got to say: thank you guys.
posted by schwa at 8:57 PM on November 4, 2008


Heh. There's honking and cheering in sleepy, conservative London Ontario. Yay for you guys! Thanks for working so hard. I can't wait to have to sew a US flag on my backpack and practice saying abaaawt when I travel.
posted by ~ at 8:57 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


And he's on stage on CNN now. God damn this makes me proud of America.
posted by caution live frogs at 8:58 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm watching the Obama family walk on the stage, and I have tears in my eyes.
posted by SSinVan at 8:58 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh, thank God.
I am so happy and proud.
posted by pointystick at 8:58 PM on November 4, 2008


tonight's excitement is the total, complete opposite of the jaded 'ugghhh' i felt four years ago.
posted by bilgepump at 8:58 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Now just hoping that shitbag Norm Coleman loses. Fingers crossed.
posted by caution live frogs at 8:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Quoting my husband "They are celebrating in Kenya for something that we did."

I am so proud of us tonight!
posted by a22lamia at 8:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Live feed of Obama's acceptance speech. The moment he and his family took to the stage, the first 20 rows of the audience all held cameras up. It is indeed a new era.
posted by anthill at 8:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This is for that kid from my high school--a public high school in the backwoods of rural North Carolina, 90% black, and with an absolutely dismal graduation rate--who wrote a poem for our literary magazine with the repeating line "I believe one day a black man will be president."

Ten years ago I was surprised at his conviction. Today, I want to go back in time and say "Guess what, kid--you were right, and sooner than any of us expected."
posted by duvatney at 8:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [9 favorites]


"Hello Chicago!"

Dude is a fucking ROCK STAR.
posted by caution live frogs at 8:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


Its a new morning in America.
posted by diggerroo at 9:00 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh.. and THANKS are due to "dignified" and "outraged" fellas like LOU DOBBS for alienating whole classes, races, and generations!
posted by celerystick at 9:00 PM on November 4, 2008


When you all start to pay the trillions in reparations you owe to the rest of the world, then you people can start singing your sickening chant.
posted by DirtyCreature at 9:01 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Ok, I'm crying now. So happy.
posted by selfmedicating at 9:01 PM on November 4, 2008


i owe people money. and it will be the happiest payout i've ever made.

(thank you america--the cracks in my shell of cynicism have gone wide enough that i can see light again. light!)
posted by RedEmma at 9:01 PM on November 4, 2008


As a Brit living in the US, I've watched this election with a mixture of bemusement and horror (the latter largely since Palin was named).

You never really had anything to atone for, but nonetheless, USA, today you've done good. As someone upthread pointed out, now you've got the hard part ahead of you. For the past 7-8 years you've been digging a deeper, darker hole, and now you've realised that you can't dig upwards.

Time to climb.

Congratulations, and most of all welcome back. We've missed you.
posted by Nice Guy Mike at 9:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


He's put his hands on the arse of history or something.
posted by Abiezer at 9:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Even though I did not vote for Obama, I have to admit the guy has charisma. Just watching his speech I want to give the man a hug.
posted by Monochrome at 9:02 PM on November 4, 2008


Watching Obama's acceptance speech.

No booing when McCain's and Palin's names are mentioned.
posted by ardgedee at 9:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


Woot!

Now we can get started getting stuff done.
posted by schyler523 at 9:03 PM on November 4, 2008


Yeah, suck it, haters!
posted by infinitywaltz at 9:03 PM on November 4, 2008


New puppy!
posted by erpava at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


new puppy! :)
posted by prunes at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


NEW PUPPY!
Those kids are so lucky!
posted by Balisong at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


Yippee!
posted by Lynsey at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


Whew! No boos when he mentioned McCain...classy!
posted by troybob at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


NEW PUPPY? ARE YOU SERIOUS?

Win.
posted by jinjo at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


NEW PUPPY COMING WITH US TO THE WHITE HOUSE!!!
posted by blasdelf at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh, God, when he promised his daughters a puppy ...
posted by Bookhouse at 9:04 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Note: It is no longer yes we can, it is we did it!!!
posted by JoeXIII007 at 9:05 PM on November 4, 2008


How do I reconcile this cautious optimism with my natural cynicism?
posted by JaredSeth at 9:05 PM on November 4, 2008 [9 favorites]


I grew up in Canada steeped in the mythology of America the Good. The American dream, the taciturn cowboy, the WWII hero, the rugged individualist rancher, the hyper-ethical egghead scientist, the natty ratpack crooner, the zen beatnik and the silly hippy. Around the time I was old enough to start understanding that things were not always quite as they seemed in the movies and on TV, just as I started to actually become interested in politics and the world at large, Ronald Reagan was elected, and I grew more disappointed and depressed as the years went by.

It's literally been almost three decades since I've felt that there was any hope at all that the America that I believed in, that I have never stopped wanting to believe in, might somehow come to pass. Hope dimmed, for me at least, and almost disappeared entirely in the last 8 years. It's seemed like there was no going back, that there was no way to break the downward spiral, and the rot was creeping out into the rest of the world, and there was just no point in trying to keep those dreams alive of there ever being a greater force for good in the world.

For the first time in 30 years, at least for now, I'm hopeful. If any nation in the world, any President, can truly make a historic change to reverse the course of our civilization, it is America, and it may just be this new president of yours. Who knows if our man will be able to shoulder the burden of the hopes of so many that he has willingly assumed. Bless him for trying, whether he succeeds or not.

Thank you, Americans, for doing the right thing, finally, and thanks for fanning that dream of the possibility of a better world alight again in this tired ol' heart of mine.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 9:05 PM on November 4, 2008 [70 favorites]


Here ya go:

When MCain mentioned Obama in his concession, the crowd booed Obama.

When Obama mentioned McCain in his victory speech, the crowd CHEERED for McCain. I didn't hear a single boo.


To me, that says it all.
posted by spirit72 at 9:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [62 favorites]


I spent my evening watching the coverage and knitting a pair of socks. I'm going to tell the person to whom I give the socks that they aren't just any socks; they are historic socks. And also 10% cashmere.
posted by orange swan at 9:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [45 favorites]


@spirit72 I was thinking that too. It says a lot.
posted by schwa at 9:07 PM on November 4, 2008


I wish I could explain this moment from the perspective of a woman of color, sitting here in my living room with my kids, raised from their beds by my shrieking in overwhelmed excitement, watching a man whose skin looks like theirs, set the course for their future.

But there aren't words.
posted by Dreama at 9:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [47 favorites]


Pride. This must be pride that I feel.
posted by mmahaffie at 9:07 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


spirit72, I really doubt that the crowd would have cheered McCain if Obama lost. Seriously?
posted by anthill at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


I just can't believe my home state of Ohio finally got it right. I hope I'm not dreaming. [pinching, pinching]
posted by HopperFan at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2008


woah, woah, woah...

He's BLACK?!?!
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [26 favorites]


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
posted by ZakDaddy at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes We Did.
posted by krazykity16 at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Whats that opposite of shame?
posted by prunes at 9:09 PM on November 4, 2008


New puppy!

Also: Biden's wife says he can get a dog.
posted by Xere at 9:09 PM on November 4, 2008


I have to say, this is fantastic. All the work, all the donations in time and money, the phone calls, and the volunteering has all paid off. And, in the spirit of hope and unity, take THAT, girl I dated who said Obama would never win and Hillary was so much better. :-)
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 9:11 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


*sigh of relief* Thank goodness.
posted by pmurray63 at 9:12 PM on November 4, 2008


This isn't just a victory for African Americans, or Democrats, or even America. Citizens of the world, we have won. From New York to New Zealand, congratulations everyone!
posted by hal_c_on at 9:12 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Amazing. Awesome.
posted by JakeEXTREME at 9:12 PM on November 4, 2008


Anybody else (besides swift) have this comment on their minds for the last four years? Way to go, octobersurprise!
posted by kimota at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008


My president. He is my president. I am so proud to say that.
posted by unknowncommand at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


Amazing speech so far.
posted by empath at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008


yes. history in the making. love it.
posted by Frasermoo at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


YES WE CAN.
posted by empath at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


To those who didn't vote for me: I will be your President too.

Class act. I honestly think he can win over a lot of people who still don't think he's the right man for the job. Not by words (and god knows the man is good with words!) but through his actions.

Loving this. Savoring it. Hope lives on. To all you folks that considered moving to Canada in '04 - thanks for sticking it out and registering your displeasure by voting rather than leaving.
posted by caution live frogs at 9:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


"New puppy" thing just shows what a pandering jerk he really is.
posted by Fuzzy Skinner at 9:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


Hell yes!

When I was young I thought someday I might go into politics (I guess I might still). My first short story (I haven't wrote much fiction period) was science fiction involving a woman senator running for president.

Obama winning means a lot to that teenage girl.
posted by R343L at 9:14 PM on November 4, 2008


Fuzzy Skinner wants a puppy.
posted by Balisong at 9:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


Okay. I'm starting to be jealous of America for the first time in my life! OBAMA FOR CANADA!!!
posted by SSinVan at 9:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


I think that might have been the next "I have a dream."
posted by susanbeeswax at 9:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


What an awesome speech! I'm so happy to have a president that can actually give wonderful speeches.

I can't wait to hold his feet to the fire for everything he does, but he'll probably give a wonderful retort.
posted by Balisong at 9:17 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


Was Jesse Jackson just crying?
posted by prunes at 9:18 PM on November 4, 2008


I WAS WRONG! Thank you Jesus.
posted by tkchrist at 9:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


This is election has been so much better than the best movie I've ever seen.
posted by empath at 9:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


Jesse Jackson has been crying for a while. So is Oprah. I wish they'd stop, it makes me tear up.
posted by Brainy at 9:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


You know who he remeinded me of tonight? Bobby Kennedy, same spirit as JFK, but more clear-eyed and capable.
posted by jonmc at 9:21 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


I WAS WRONG! Thank you Jesus.

I thought more along the lines of thank fuck for that.
posted by Nice Guy Mike at 9:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Now: cabinet picks! appointments! (put McCain on veterans' affairs!) inaugural poem! inaugural balls! first-100-days plan!
posted by troybob at 9:22 PM on November 4, 2008


And... that's it. It's over. No recounts, no ballot machine confusion - a clear victor, and history being made. I haven't felt this way since I saw the Berlin Wall fall on TV. Finally. Finally.
posted by wanderingmind at 9:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


PUPPIES FOR ALL!
posted by gomichild at 9:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


Tull text of the speech already online.

The most water-eyed moment for me was this:

[...] Tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from our the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals: democracy, liberty, opportunity, and unyielding hope.

posted by daHIFI at 9:23 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


November 4th, 2008
posted by 31d1 at 9:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [20 favorites]


This result restores the very notion of America as a functioning democracy and meritocracy.

She was in real danger of becoming a de facto aristocracy with immediate family members of prior presidents becoming president or running for president. May neither party ever again have the shortsightedness to nominate another son, daughter, 1st cousin, niece, nephew, wife, or husband of a prior president. May the idea of trading on "name recognition" be forever consigned to the criminal idiocy bin when it comes to choosing someone for the single most important role in the world. May the Republican powers that be realize the height of irresponsibility they attained when deciding to prop Bush II up and run him for president based on the one imbecilic qualification that he shared his last name with a prior president.

Congratulations America - at the beginning of Obama's run I believed he was unelectable, that American's would find themselves unable to vote for a man of color. I cannot express my joy in knowing now I was wrong in that assessment.

America, you done good tonight, real good.
posted by scheptech at 9:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [19 favorites]


That is my president up there. I have a huge huge smile and tears streaming down my cheeks. Thank you America.
posted by vewystwange at 9:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Stavros -- I grew up in Canada, maybe one or two years later than you, and never once in my life until this election thought of the idea of the American Dream or American exceptionalism as anything except ironic and funny. The American Dream was a fiction of golden age Cinema. The American Dream was a Horatio Alger fiction. Or even a cynical fiction by bad people. Although America is the most important country in the world filled with wonderful things and people, the idea that America as a concept might have something to offer or teach me has never occurred to me in my life prior until this election. The stories I keep reading about Obama giving money to a stranger in the airport who's moving to Norway, the recognition of how much more he's done in his life with less than me -- and of the decency he seems to protect despite a life that is harder than mine -- inspires me for real. The idea of drawing on a political leader noncritically for inspiration astonishes me. It might not be incidental that I'm considering a short gig in the US for the first time in my life. In any case, I figure a lot of mefites put a lot of work into this election, so let me just repeat what I and others have said: thank you.
posted by ~ at 9:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Brainy: "Jesse Jackson has been crying for a while. So is Oprah. I wish they'd stop, it makes me tear up."

Yea, me too.
posted by octothorpe at 9:25 PM on November 4, 2008


In four years, the stupid shit they tried to attack him with this election will be moot. No one will be able to say "we don't know the real Obama."

Meanwhile, if McCain would have won, it would have lead to an even greater level of slimey campaigning in the future, trying to throw out the most baseless radical accusations possible.

Maybe, just maybe, politicians will step back a little from the venom and begin to conduct respectful campaigns.
posted by drezdn at 9:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I woke up my four year old. She's a huge Obama fan. "Look, Georgia." I said. "Obama won." "YAY!" she said. "Now, can I go back to bed?"
posted by ColdChef at 9:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [23 favorites]


When you all start to pay the trillions in reparations you owe to the rest of the world, then you people can start singing your sickening chant.

2/10. Banal, not very well executed.

You know, when Barack Obama was born in that manager and those three wise men came to present him gifts I doubt anyone could have foreseen he would some day be elected president. Congratulations to Senator Obama, please send my brother a copy of your birth certificate so he'll shut up already. Thank You.
posted by MikeMc at 9:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Fuck yeah we can. And we did. And we will.
posted by casarkos at 9:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I mentioned it in the other thread this morning, but I voted for this man with my 6 month old baby boy by my side this morning. I really can't express how excited I am that this is how his understanding of American politics begins. He's going to take for granted that our president is a man of color. Amazing.
posted by NoRelationToLea at 9:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Yes yes yes yes YES!
posted by DakotaPaul at 9:27 PM on November 4, 2008


Merlin: STAND BACK! Be silent! Be still! That's it... and look upon this moment. Savor it! Rejoice with great gladness! Great gladness! Remember it always, for you are joined by it. You are One, under the stars. Remember it well, then... this night, this great victory.
posted by SPrintF at 9:28 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I have never been so proud of the United States as I am tonight.

Your northern neighbour thanks you.

And anybody who watched that miraculous speech and remained dry-eyed has no soul. I'm still crying.
posted by dirtynumbangelboy at 9:28 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


God. I am so uncharacteristically happy... got way to used be being among the powerless.

I wish the wife and I weren't saddled with the flu 'cause I'd really like get down to the bar get hammered and then hump my wife right there in the middle of the street.

Ah screw it. Pneumonia will be worth it.

Way to go America.
posted by tkchrist at 9:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


two quotes from Jed Bartlet

"break's over"

and

"Tomorrow"
posted by timsteil at 9:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


All that is left is for the Hoosier state to do the right (left) thing.

Let's go, Indiana!
posted by paisley henosis at 9:31 PM on November 4, 2008


I am proud to be an American tonight. And I know the kids I teach dance to tomorrow are gonna be elated. As one of my students said "whoever messes up in their line is voting for mccain!" That got them doing the step right real fast!
posted by wilky at 9:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


DAMN he's good.
posted by yhbc at 9:31 PM on November 4, 2008


Brainy: "Jesse Jackson has been crying for a while. So is Oprah. I wish they'd stop, it makes me tear up."

Yea, me too.

And anybody who watched that miraculous speech and remained dry-eyed has no soul. I'm still crying.


What's with all of the crying? Seriously. I can't even imagine crying over an election, am I just that much of a cynic? Why no, I didn't vote for McCain, why do you ask?
posted by MikeMc at 9:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Almost unbearably happy. Classy concession by McCain, and phenomenal speech by Obama tonight. Now, can I request a pony that automatically favorites every post in this thread? and a pair of those socks?
posted by spinturtle at 9:32 PM on November 4, 2008


SURELY THIS
posted by shakespeherian at 9:33 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


AMERICA: it's not just for idiots anymore
posted by mazola at 9:33 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


I am glad I stayed up to hear his speech. He has a big job to do, but I think he might actually pull it off. The part where he talked about his daughters, and the progress they might see in 100 years, yeah, I actually started to cry.
posted by sandraregina at 9:33 PM on November 4, 2008


California is also reporting NO on 8. Woohoo!
posted by Manhasset at 9:34 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done, America!
posted by Lucie at 9:34 PM on November 4, 2008


NYT reports "Racial Barrier Falls."






Hopefully.
posted by paisley henosis at 9:35 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm glad Obama won. How exciting. I like people in general more today than I have previously.
posted by I Foody at 9:35 PM on November 4, 2008


Yeah, I couldn't keep myself from crying during his acceptance speech.
posted by Green Eyed Monster at 9:36 PM on November 4, 2008


posting in an epic everything
posted by penduluum at 9:36 PM on November 4, 2008


California is also reporting NO on 8. Woohoo!

I'm seeing YES on 8 ahead by 9 points on C-SPAN. Where are you seeing NO?
posted by shakespeherian at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008


AMAZING.
posted by Skygazer at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008


I don't know what I can say that hasn't already been said. I suppose I'm still in shock. When George W. Bush was elected in 2000, I was utterly flabbergasted, and for eight years, that "ohgodfuckshit" feeling at every. single. decision. of our government just kept compounding and compounding in my heart, making me feel more and more cynical, more and more sure that hope was a very stupid thing to have in this world. Now, I'm looking at pretty much the exact President I would want in the White House ... a smart, intelligent, eloquent, sure-footed peacemaker of a man. I've been wondering exactly what monstrosity our America would continue to transform into. Now, I'm wondering to what heights we can reach. Thank God. Yes, we can. (And, fucking fuck yeah, presidential Chicago pride! WOO!)
posted by WCityMike at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


Thank God!!!

I loved the new puppy comment BTW - what a mensch!
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008


I voted for this man with my puppy this morning...

damn... I've underestimated this country..... I'm proud as can be of this country, of these people...

things will be better...
posted by HuronBob at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008


Indiana is 50-49 for Barack with less than 16,000K difference and 91% reporting. As one from Indiana and Virginia I am so astonished right now.

The party is over for me tonight. I'm going to bed, but I'm gonna have the hardest time falling asleep. Can't wait to see the rest of this thread in the morning.

Good night everyone, enjoy the party tonight. We've got work tomorrow.
posted by daHIFI at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2008


I can't favorite anymore!! But I want to favorite, kiss and hug everyone here and everyone who is proud and happy on our behalf. I'll get around to you individually when I'm sober. Promise.
posted by brain cloud at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Okay, I allowed my self to shed a few little tears of joy during his acceptance speech. Those fuckers tried to take away my hope, but I just took it back.
posted by Devils Rancher at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008


Okay, good. Now let's get to work. We've won; let's earn it.
posted by Graygorey at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


> California is also reporting NO on 8. Woohoo!
I'm seeing YES on 8 ahead by 9 points on C-SPAN. Where are you seeing NO?


I think the 9%-ahead vote is with 13% of precincts reporting.
posted by WCityMike at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008


WHO'S THE MAVERICK NOW?!

Greetings, world, from Toluca Lake, California, where DaShiv and Spacekitty and our friends and neighbors and loved ones join together to say YES... YES, WE DID!
posted by scody at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Woo!
posted by Xany at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2008


奥巴马! Though it's running second to the recent cross-straits breakthroughs on mainland news channels.
posted by Abiezer at 9:39 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


fucking fuck yes. I am very proud of this country tonight.
posted by krautland at 9:39 PM on November 4, 2008


I just talked to an old childhood friend on the phone -- the only child in the only black family in my midwestern town growing up. She was calling from Paris, where she lives now.

She couldn't stop crying.
posted by rokusan at 9:39 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Well, golly. America didn't shoot itself in the foot for a change.
posted by Peach at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008


Fantastic. I'm so happy I can hardly contain myself I feel like I'm living in a West Wing episode, except it is very, very. Still so much to do, though.

Breaks over.
posted by piratebowling at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008


Still holding my breath for Prop. 8
posted by Kloryne at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


h♥pe.
posted by shoepal at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


B-B-But what about the Palin FPPs; will they end? :)

Also: Bonus points!
posted by not_on_display at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008


Was shuttling between client-site somewhere in the east of Singapore and office and had checked the news on my mobile. Quietly told the cabbie that Barack Obama is the new American president. The guy broke hard, swerved and turned back and said, "That black man?"

It started raining right about then.

He turns back to the road and mutters, "Never thought it would happen".

Recorded for posterity.
posted by the cydonian at 9:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


I'm seeing YES on 8 ahead by 9 points on C-SPAN. Where are you seeing NO?

CNN.
posted by Manhasset at 9:41 PM on November 4, 2008


YEAH!
posted by malaprohibita at 9:41 PM on November 4, 2008


What's this about a new puppy? Are they going to rescue it from a shelter?
posted by turgid dahlia at 9:41 PM on November 4, 2008


Obama quoted Abraham LIncoln twice and mentioned him one other time. Another reason I'm glad I voted for him.

I know there is a lot of hard work ahead, but I hope he and his family have some FUN while he's president. His kids get a puppy and they can hang out with Bruce Springsteen. How cool is that?
posted by marxchivist at 9:42 PM on November 4, 2008


USA: Yes you could. I'm sorry you even had to briefly think that you couldn't.

Fan fucking tastic.

Thank you from the bottom of my New Zealand heart.
posted by pivotal at 9:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


GLORIOUS
posted by thatelsagirl at 9:42 PM on November 4, 2008


"When you all start to pay the trillions in reparations you owe to the rest of the world, then you people can start singing your sickening chant."

That's why the why ATTENTION WORLD, THE US OF A IS BACK! WE'RE GOOD AGAIN! LETS BE FRIENDS!!!!!!!!!1111ONES spirit throughout this thread is, to say the least, naive.

Sorry to rain on your parade people, but big chunks of this world hated the US before GW Bush and will keep on hating after Obama. You doubt it? Maybe our favorite antisemitic cartoonist can help me get my point across.

I find it interesting that some people find this fact unbearable and fail to understand that the basic promises of America, what it represents, is a threat to ancient evil that lurks in the dark corners in this planet. Obama or no Obama, this evil won't give up, won't change, won't forget and won't learn.

Do you really take this "popularity contest" approach to life? Do you think it stands?

Something important happened tonight. Obama's election is an awesome sign of what a great country America is. A member of a racial minority, son of an immigrant, coming from a unusual family, with a foreign "threatening" name, elected president. Nowhere else this could have happened - literally, this is an ONLY IN AMERICA moment. But as fantastic as it is, the world hasn't changed. The sky is still blue and shit still stinks.

So let's take it easy with the expectations so we won't hurt ourselves, shall we?
posted by falameufilho at 9:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Jesse Jackson has been crying for a while. So is Oprah. I wish they'd stop, it makes me tear up.

Yea, me too.


Me three. So relieved...
posted by The Ardship of Cambry at 9:43 PM on November 4, 2008


Caribou who?
posted by Devils Slide at 9:43 PM on November 4, 2008


People are cheering in the street. In Missouri.
posted by Monsters at 9:43 PM on November 4, 2008


Meet the new boss, nothing like the old boss.
posted by mr.grum at 9:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


I'm pretty sure it was metafilter where I saw a link to a transcript by a speech by some new senator. It was a real nice speech, about how the whole pervasive narrative about a "Red America" and "Blue America" was so much destructive bullshit. (I'm paraphrasing just a touch.) A real nice speech. The kind of speech I was surprised was even being uttered in American politics anymore.

People were saying, "That guy's going to be President one day. You can tell."

At the time, I was absolutely certain that there was no way that would ever be allowed to happen.

Wrong. I was so wrong. Man, that feels good.
posted by Drastic at 9:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [12 favorites]


Today, it feels like the future.
posted by tss at 9:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Dave and I stayed up to hear Obama's speech and now we are heading off to bed although NC has not yet been called; Obama is up 50,000 votes, so we are hopeful. Dole lost her senate seat to Kay Hagan and Bev Perdue is the new Governor so all our dreams came true. Now, if only NC will declare for Obama, this night will be perfect. Come on NC!
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 9:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I feel like I've made it to the shore, and my reaction is mostly to collapse into the sand.
posted by washburn at 9:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


Crook County Wyoming voted 89% McCain.
Another place not to live ever.
posted by PHINC at 9:45 PM on November 4, 2008


That's what we can call "The Obama Effect."
posted by brain cloud at 9:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


My post for posterity: With 99% of the vote in, my home state of Indiana has gone blue with Obama up by over 16,000 votes. Fuckin' A!!!!
posted by AstroGuy at 9:46 PM on November 4, 2008


Congratulations, USA.

I'm happy for you.

And I can finally stop calling your president an idiot.
posted by CrazyLemonade at 9:46 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I don't think I have ever been so proud to be an American.

Plus, it's a good day in Massachusetts to be a pot-smoking racing greyhound who knows its his civic duty to pay income taxes.

Now, let's sit back and hopefully watch the stock market kick some fucking ass tomorrow.
posted by Admiral Haddock at 9:46 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


Way to go America, you magnificent bastard.
posted by Deep Dish at 9:47 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I'm seeing YES on 8 ahead by 9 points on C-SPAN. Where are you seeing NO?

CNN.


Exit polls frighten me, and my understanding is that they lean liberal. I hope I'm wrong, but I'm worried.
posted by shakespeherian at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008


Really, now that I can state my petty demands with impugnity, I just want to be able to honestly say "Norf Carolina woopdeewoop!"
posted by solipsophistocracy at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008


I just turned off the television and I looked over at my wife with a twinkle in my eye, and she had one too. And we made love. For what felt like the first time ever.
Maybe things would be better if you stayed off the dating websites.
posted by tellurian at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


So who won this thing?
posted by nudar at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008


When we told my two year old, she said: "Can I open my Obama present?"
posted by Dragonness at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008 [13 favorites]


YAYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!
Good job everyone!
posted by rmless at 9:48 PM on November 4, 2008


~ My post for posterity: With 99% of the vote in, my home state of Indiana has gone blue with Obama up by over 16,000 votes. Fuckin' A!!!!

Cheers, AstroGuy! Indiana for Obama! Who'd'a'thunk it? First time blue since '64.

I am deeply impressed with you, fellow Hoosiers.
posted by paisley henosis at 9:49 PM on November 4, 2008


Congratulations, America! Let the process of rebuilding begin! It's going to be tough to undo the damage that has been wrought, but I'm confident that if America can pull together as a team, it can do great things.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:49 PM on November 4, 2008


Also ...

Republicans in this thread, please listen to me. If you want your candidates to have a chance, look at what was massively, overwhelmingly successful this time around: an eloquent candidate who preferred to focus on the issues and limit (if not eliminate) negative campaigning, a candidate who

One of the best things I could imagine happening in 2012 is for Obama to meet an Obama-ish Republican candidate. Think of the exchange of ideas that would be — a campaign on the issues, on the platforms, a belief and treatment of people as opponents and not enemies.

The Republican Party's been in a shameful, radical, hateful shape for so long. Look at the kind of man who inspired so many to vote for him. Please, change your party to model this overwhelming landslide of a success. Look at what gave Democrats a landslide, and look at the defeat caused by the current model that the Republicans are using. It's not working for you, and you're utterly damaging America.

Eject the radical, hateful elements that you've endorsed, and with a new President who's ready to reach across the aisle, you will be very welcome back into the national debate. Let's take this amazing moment in history with these new leaders to transform our politics from the mudfight it became into a legislature that we, too, can be proud of. Yes, you can.
posted by WCityMike at 9:49 PM on November 4, 2008 [36 favorites]


Love it or leave it!!!
posted by Heretic at 9:49 PM on November 4, 2008


!
posted by spiderwire at 9:50 PM on November 4, 2008


I just watched the results in my dorm's common room with a whole bunch of happy screaming people. I'm so pumped. What a wonderful day! :)
posted by ElectricBlue at 9:50 PM on November 4, 2008


Hi y'all. Just wanted to say that the rest of the world's super-excited about all of this. You'll recall that we said we hoped for this result, and that some of you said we thought this guy's "fried gold" (whatever that means).

Just wanted to add some perspective: Yes, we're happy, we're freaking elated too. But soon the time to celebrate will be over --but not very soon, particularly here we just went out for more beer! to celebrate, of course-- Remember, "eternal vigilance is the price of freedom"

Eternal vigilance.

Heavy words.

We were rooting for you guys to do the right thing. You pulled it off! Congrats.

Now, let's not fall asleep. Any of us.

The road to reconstruction is long and hard. For everyone involved, and particularly for those close enough to make a difference.

Thank you all. You pulled this off. The rest of the world is proud of you, now, don't let us down. More imporantly, don't let yourselves down.

Remember: eternal vigilance.
posted by papafrita at 9:50 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


Now, let's sit back and hopefully watch the stock market kick some fucking ass tomorrow.

I'm curious as to how big the bump will be and how long it will last.
posted by MikeMc at 9:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Whats that opposite of shame?

Less shame.
posted by milarepa at 9:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


President Barack Hussein Obama.

McCain said something in his very excellent speech that I wanted to call out. He said something along the lines of Obama's vicotry being a great victory for African Americans. I disagreed with that. It's a victory for all Americans, I think.
posted by Pastabagel at 9:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [11 favorites]


Wow. This is amazing.
posted by homunculus at 9:52 PM on November 4, 2008


Today, November 4th, is my birthday. I can't think of a better gift. Thank you America!
posted by rfbjames at 9:52 PM on November 4, 2008


Congratulations, America. And thank god for that. It's been a bloody long eight years, you know?

Literally every single person I know here in Berlin is behind this.

Welcome back to sanity!
posted by dydecker at 9:52 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm only sad I was in the US during the last lame-ass presidential election and not this one. I'm so happy for America today. You guys have had it so shitty for so long and you deserve better. Woot!
posted by BAKERSFIELD! at 9:53 PM on November 4, 2008


Love it or leave it!!!

Say, does this mean Alec Bladwin is going to move back to the United States?
posted by MikeMc at 9:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


The response in my neighborhood in the reddest county in one of the reddest states was pretty muted, but I did a little dance in my heart.
posted by mecran01 at 9:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


People are partying in the streets in my normally quiet neighborhood. Even the dealers popping off gunfire nor the rain has not quelled the, what seems to be growing crowd of hooting celebrants. Luckily my daughter is fast asleep tired out from telling people to vote "Oh-mama" all day (she's 18 months). I'm wired, a litle tipsy, and trying to write a paper but I just can't stop being giddy.
posted by Pollomacho at 9:54 PM on November 4, 2008


WOOT. As many have already said, this is amazing and I hope that he exceeds our expectations.

Also, it's looking like he could win Montana and that would be freakin' awesome.
posted by pwicks at 9:54 PM on November 4, 2008


North Carolina, as of this reading, went for Obama. Yes, y'all, we went for OBAMA. And for the first fucking time in my entire goddamn electoral life, I have this weird thing called hope. I just heard a man who I voted for, who I admire beyond almost all others, accept the presidency of the United States and admit that there are problems and that there is a long road ahead of us. I'm 45 years old and this is a New Thing for me. My god. We might just make it after all.
posted by mygothlaundry at 9:55 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


It's not just that he won, though that is enough and more than enough. It's that he did it in such a good way. Now there's a man for you, people.
posted by George_Spiggott at 9:55 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]



Now, let's sit back and hopefully watch the stock market kick some fucking ass tomorrow.

I'm curious as to how big the bump will be and how long it will last.
posted by MikeMc at 12:51 AM on November 5


Massively up across the board at the time of posting this comment.
posted by Pastabagel at 9:55 PM on November 4, 2008


Screw my latent cynicism. I've got this big old grin that keeps popping out. I just got the email from the man himself (the tubes must be sluggish tonight!), I just watched that tremendous, inspiring, tough-minded acceptance speech, I helped protect my neighbor's franchise this morning by vouching for her at the polls and I made GOTV calls from home while my little man slept this afternoon. And I just feel very good.

And to Pastabagel, I want to say: I know perfectly well that this was the easy part. I think a lot of us do. I favorited that comment because of this:

If you worked on the Obama campaign, especially is states like Virginia, I think you are the ones who did something heroic.

I kept supporting Obama, and I voted for Obama - even after real, grave disappointments like his FISA vote - because I believed and believe (and am just further confirmed by his acceptance speech) that President-elect Obama absolutely understands and believes that what you wrote there is the truth. And that is the hope, that is the change that we could believe in.

Thank you, thank you, thank you to all of you who I know worked so much harder than I did. You deserve that big grin I know is on your faces more than I do. And tomorrow, to the work.
posted by nanojath at 9:55 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I'm seeing YES on 8 ahead by 9 points on C-SPAN. Where are you seeing NO?

CNN.


Thanks for that. Looks like maybe I get to be proud of my country and my state on the same night. There are 10 million of us in L.A. county and most of us say "fuck no!" to bigotry.
posted by drjimmy11 at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008


HEY! HEY AMERICA!!!!

CONGRATULATIONS!!! YOU DONE GOOD TODAY.

From: An Australian.
posted by Effigy2000 at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm sitting in my apartment in midtown Atlanta. People are honking and shouting "Obama" down on the street. And they've been doing it continuously -- a nonstop chorus of unabashed happiness -- since I walked in ten minutes ago. (Yes, I'm that addicted to metafilter.) Also people are setting off fireworks from random spots. It's pretty incredible.
posted by crackingdes at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008


Here in Seattle, lower capitol hill is officially losing its shit. Horns are going. People are screaming. I've got to do schoolwork tonight (sigh) but I just took a walk around the block, screamed a little, and did a double-handed near-tearful high five with a stranger.

It's a good world out there tonight.
posted by palmcorder_yajna at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Two words: pride and happiness.
posted by Toecutter at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008


haha! we did it, we fuckin' did it!

Obama's going to the White House and MA Prop 1 went down in flames. I am so giddy and full of energy I don't know what to do with myself.

hehe! we did it!
posted by xbonesgt at 9:56 PM on November 4, 2008


I've had the shittiest day today. Parking ticket. Broke my glasses, currently fumbling around in an old prescription. But fuck it, this news makes it all better. GO OBAMA!

America, I never knew tears of joy until today.
posted by Xere at 9:57 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


! Yes we can! We didn't mess it up!

Now I can go to bed.
posted by Zephyrial at 9:58 PM on November 4, 2008


Stavros -- I grew up in Canada, maybe one or two years later than you, and never once in my life until this election thought of the idea of the American Dream or American exceptionalism as anything except ironic and funny.

Really? When you were 8 years old, or 10? Never? You grew up faster than I did, then.

Hollywood might have taken the stories that Americans tell about themselves and used those self-regarding tales to weave fictions of black and white heroes and villains, of a nation as a force for good rather than evil, that there might even be such things as unalloyed good and evil, but the fact is that those stories, even though they grow out of a vast supporting web of cultural beliefs, were just that. Stories, myths, patriotic lullabies.

What I was trying to say is that my feelings about America were once, when I was a child, clear and positive. By the time I reached my teens, that changed, and have gotten darker and less hopeful and more angry since. But I've always had, deep down, a wish that there was actually something to it all -- that America as the most powerful and richest country on the planet could actually someday be the kind of nation that its most enthusiastic boosters claimed it to be, against all evidence to the contrary.

The obvious gap between what America so often presented itself as, to itself and the world at large, what it could be, what I had believed it to be when I was a child, and the reality of what it so clearly was -- for decades that's underpinned much of my anger and resentment. I've always known this. I've let my alligator mouth overstep my jaybird ass on the subject more than a few times.

But again, what I was trying to say upthread was that I would like very much to let that resentment go. America's never going to be the nation 1950's Hollywood made it out to be -- of course not. But maybe, just maybe, it can be a force for good in the world. Like I said: for the first time in decades, I'm feeling this afternoon like it could happen. The American people, divided and dazzled by bullshit as they have been for so many years, can actually pull together, when things get bad enough, and change the goddamn world for the better. That's... a relief.

After that speech of Obama's half an hour ago, I'm feeling it all the more.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 9:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


I grew up reading science fiction, and thinking of how awesome the future is going to be.

I haven't felt like that about the future for a long time now.

I feel like that again tonight.

There is hope.

Thank you.
posted by MrVisible at 9:59 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I think I'm going to pee my pants.
posted by loquacious at 10:00 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Way to go, folks. I am so tired from the wait, the excitement, and then the emotions raised by the speech. I'm going to bed. But not before I stop in at this very special community and raise a virtual glass with you all. Cheers!! Especially you, vito90, for telling me it would all be ok. It was!
posted by TochterAusElysium at 10:00 PM on November 4, 2008


Growing up in Montana, every 4 years I would have to listen to the war stories of my parents on how national returns from Montana were often the last to come in. Evidently Montana for many years used a punch-card system called a "vota-matic", which I assume created punch-cards that could be counted mechanically.

My parents had seen this happen enough times that they always chose to use conventional paper ballots.

Evidently the physical count was going very slowly one year due to feed failures, so someone suggested that talcum powder should be sprinkled onto the punch cards before insertion. This, not surprisingly, made things much worse. I think this happened back in the 50's or 60's, so I'm now curious for the reason Montana is slow in its count in 2008.
posted by Tube at 10:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Sappy as it may sound, I was struck the most after the speech when Michelle gave him a peck on the lips and you could see her say, "I love you."

Her enthusiasm seemed genuine and totally opposite of the plastic political wives we've become accustomed to. And I remember thinking, "Yeah, this guy knows how to pick 'em."

So while I'll probably wake up tomorrow as cynical and hung-over as always, I'm going to go to bed tonight thinking I'm going to be in good hands.
posted by Cyrano at 10:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


* high-five to stavros *
posted by yhbc at 10:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Being in the state that would be called first for Obama, it has been a quiet day here. Quiet, but good. It is going to be tough waiting for January...
posted by meinvt at 10:02 PM on November 4, 2008


One of the best things I could imagine happening in 2012 is for Obama to meet an Obama-ish Republican candidate. Think of the exchange of ideas that would be — a campaign on the issues, on the platforms, a belief and treatment of people as opponents and not enemies.

This.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 10:02 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


Sweet!
posted by snofoam at 10:03 PM on November 4, 2008


!
posted by zhivota at 10:03 PM on November 4, 2008


Wikipedia's got turnout figures (as much as I dislike trusting them as a reference source);

2004 -- 122,295,345 out of 215,694,000 votes — 56.69%
2008 -- 133,917,120 (estimate) out of ________ votes — ?%

Also, Bush is going to speak in the Rose Garden at 10:40 am CST about the election.
posted by WCityMike at 10:04 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm relieved, and surprised that I'm not as cynical as I thought I was. Watching these speeches, seeing this unfold has created a glimmer of hope that all of the bullshit, corruption and cynicism about the US might not be permanent.

I moved out of the country a few years ago to get away from all of that, but for the first time in a long while, I can consider going home.
posted by Lord_Pall at 10:04 PM on November 4, 2008


After a heated but ultimately productive community meeting here in this city on the Canadian prairie, we trucked off to my father-in-law's with the giant-screen TV and opened a bottle of champagne for the acceptance speech. Felt flat-out great to see a political result worth celebrating.

Here's how I explained to my three-year-old why it was such a big night:

"This is the first time in his whole life the guy Dad wanted to win actually won."

Damn, this is something. I'm envious of an American political outcome for the first time pretty much ever. We could use some of that hopeful spirit up here, and I'm optimistic for the spillover effect.
posted by gompa at 10:05 PM on November 4, 2008


Still hasn't sunk in . . .

I'm going to sit and stare at the TV for a bit. I have and always will love my country, right now it's just a bit more.
posted by cmfletcher at 10:05 PM on November 4, 2008


Hope over fear, hope over cynism, pragmatic understanding...

Today is a great day.
posted by spiderskull at 10:06 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh please Democrats, dont screw this up.
posted by damn dirty ape at 10:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


THE FUCK WE CAN'T!
posted by Navelgazer at 10:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [25 favorites]


> THE FUCK WE CAN'T!

I love this.
posted by WCityMike at 10:07 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done!!!! I'm so happy for you USians!
posted by dhruva at 10:08 PM on November 4, 2008


The real question is whether Al Franken will be a senator.
posted by Pastabagel at 10:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


What's this about a new puppy? Are they going to rescue it from a shelter?

I was thinking that myself. Maybe then we can stop the terror that is the weep-inducing Sarah McLachlan ASPCA commercial.
posted by bitter-girl.com at 10:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


I wish I could buy WCityMike a drink. The #1 Chi-Town MeFite.
posted by paisley henosis at 10:08 PM on November 4, 2008


I can't stop smiling. So much potential for good! Eeeeeeeeeee!

This is so exciting!
posted by batmonkey at 10:09 PM on November 4, 2008


This Hoosier is not leaving the computer until I see that state turn blue, dammit! COME ON, INDIANA! MAKE ME PROUD.

(All the Aussies and Asians and everybody in my office today were skyping me congratulations and coming up to give me high-fives. I've yet to find a single person in Sydney who would've preferred McCain to win.)
posted by web-goddess at 10:09 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


PS- Twice now I elected Obama to National Office.
posted by paisley henosis at 10:09 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


One of the best things I could imagine happening in 2012 is for Obama to meet an Obama-ish Republican candidate.

That would be nice, but when Obama ran for Senate the GOP put him against uber-nutter Alan Keyes. I dont think we're going to have this kind of thing until the GOP takes a couple of steps to the left and finally jettisons its fundamentalists. Hopefully the GOP learned a lesson tonight.
posted by damn dirty ape at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I will now sleep the softly snory sleep of angels.
posted by cowbellemoo at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008


Fireworks, _hours_ of straight cheering and beeping, 2 helicopters over the castro. half a bottle of wine in me. so happy. got to get outside!
posted by bottlebrushtree at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008


Al Franken's and Norm Coleman's race is too close to call. Because he's good enough, he's smart enough, and doggone it, people like him.
posted by WCityMike at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008


We just woke up in London to Radio 4 telling us this. They played a bit of his speech before they announced it. My wife and I lay in the dark and hugged each other. What an amazing day to be alive. Congratulations President-Elect Obama.
posted by Happy Dave at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008


Please STOP IT with the USAian stuff. We're Americans. We have a black President now, don't you know.
posted by yhbc at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


This is really awesome. It's the first time in awhile that I haven't wanted to break something after hearing Presidential election results.

Go us!
posted by MythMaker at 10:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Was Jesse Jackson just crying?

When Dr. King was shot, Jesse Jackson was standing next to him. And now he's seeing a black man elected President.

He's allowed a few tears.
posted by mightygodking at 10:11 PM on November 4, 2008 [45 favorites]




I'm so fucking happy. Worried, still about Props 8 and 2 and 6, but still happy.

Also, kind of wishing I'd gone out to an election party tonight. Totally could have gotten laid in the euphoria.

Ah, well.
posted by Caduceus at 10:12 PM on November 4, 2008


People were saying, "That guy's going to be President one day. You can tell."

I was one of the people saying that. That was his speech at the Democratic Convention (Kerry's convention) in 2004. And in the last couple weeks a few people have "congratulated" me for "calling that so early."

I didn't have the courage to admit that when I said that, I meant someday... like 2016.

I sure as hell didn't expect it just four years later. It's pretty unbelievable.
posted by rokusan at 10:12 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


> That would be nice, but when Obama ran for Senate the GOP put him against uber-nutter Alan Keyes.

That was because their candidate for most of the campaign was in a huge sex club scandal with his wife, Seven of Nine herself, and it essentially torpedoed his campaign very close to the election; Alan was looked for as a sacrificial ... goat? lamb?
posted by WCityMike at 10:12 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm obsessively refreshing until all the polls come in on North Carolina.

It was close here, but I think we've done it. As of this moment 13,505 people's votes have made the difference here in the Tarheel state.

I still can't believe this. It's too big, and too dazzling. I was so convinced that it would never happen that I can't accept that it has.

Now the real work begins.
posted by winna at 10:12 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh wow, check out Huffington's photos of reactions around the world.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 10:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


I was just watching CNN talk about the Cathedral and Bazaar. Hopefully we will be dancing in the Bazaar.
posted by Rubbstone at 10:13 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm right with you in spirit, paisley henosis. If Indiana goes blue, it'll be worth all the harrassment I've taken in the past few weeks from right wingers back home (some of them within my own family). I hope, I hope, I hope!
posted by web-goddess at 10:15 PM on November 4, 2008


In less exciting news:
Arizona banned gay marriage, with Florida and California likely to follow.
Arkansas banned adoption by gay parents.
Nebraska voted to end affirmative action.

Still a lot of work to be done.
posted by Saxon Kane at 10:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


DAMN IT, CALIFORNIA. I'm not going to sleep until there's a definite result on Prop 8.
posted by lullaby at 10:18 PM on November 4, 2008


Congrats, guys! Well done! We're all impressed over here, I can tell you. ;)
posted by Hildegarde at 10:18 PM on November 4, 2008


As tough as it was in the primaries, a thanks goes out to Clinton and her supporters. She helped America to get to know Obama. Plus she tested him, giving him the chance to develop effective defenses against everything the Republicans threw at him.
posted by drezdn at 10:18 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


How...wonderful! :)
posted by darkstar at 10:19 PM on November 4, 2008


I feel like I can fully exhale for the first time in a long time.
posted by umbú at 10:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I can't help but wonder if this is how it felt when WW2 ended...
posted by Deep Dish at 10:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


VERY PROUD!
U.S.A!
posted by orelius at 10:20 PM on November 4, 2008


Sorry to rain on your parade people, but big chunks of this world hated the US before GW Bush and will keep on hating after Obama.

Well, ideally we have an opportunity to stop torturing people and start getting our shit back together. You'll have to pardon us if we get a little excited about it when we find out we got the job. The whole getting-the-world-to-love-us-again thing is the bonus we get at the end of the year|decade|century if we start doing the right things and keep doing them.

In other words, don't harsh our buzz. We're just happy to have another shot.
posted by davejay at 10:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


REAL TALK
posted by ORthey at 10:20 PM on November 4, 2008


It's just, it's simply unbelievable.

It is unbelievable that the work of millions of people without connections or clout or vast money or insider power, came together under the idea of reform, calmness, and rationality, with malice towards none and FUCKING GOT THEIR ODD-NAMED MINORITY SMARTY-PANTS-TALKER ELECTED In a LANDSLIDE

That measured appeals to intellect and fairness and being a fucking adult about things worked over base pandering and baiting


THAT NEVER HAPPENS.

Redemption my friends. Motherfucking REDEMPTION.
posted by The Whelk at 10:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [28 favorites]


Much of Obama's win can be attributed to the youth 18-29 getting out to vote.

I hope this election proves to yong voters that participation does make a difference, and that we'll see a sea change in the makeup of the political parties. I hope the Republican party is rebuilt from the ground up, by smart young people who understand today's needs.

I note with interest that the anti-abortion initiatives appear to have been roundly rejected. This, too, is an indication that voters understand the reality of modern times. Stem cell research and medical marijuana initiatives also passed.

If there's one downside to this election, it's that a number of states have rejected gay marriage rights. I hope that if the nation is going to insist that marriage is a religious concept, that at least gay couples be granted full civil rights. In the end, we'll all call it marriage anyway. It's not like we have a problem calling common-law couples "married," after all, even if we are hell-bound sinners in the eyes of the churches.

And, wow, did the Democrats stomp hell out of the Republicans. Presidency, Senate, and House in full control. As a Canuck, I actually find that a little scary: I like minority-power governments. It helps rein in the leading party. Limits the damage they can do.

I'm so hopeful that America will rejoin the global community. Maybe the country is finally growing up!
posted by five fresh fish at 10:20 PM on November 4, 2008


This is amazing. Amazing, amazing, amazing.

And now... What's next?
posted by cider at 10:21 PM on November 4, 2008


And you know, it's kind of stupid: even though I'd love to go out and run about the streets of my manic, manic, overjoyed neighborhood-- it feels sort of good to be here at home, logging into PubMed and rolling up my sleeves to do some science.

The next several years of American life are going to be about service: Building, mending, untangling, balming. The best way that I can serve my country, my species, and my planet is through my work-- doing the most thoughtful and most thorough research I can do, and working to transform myself the finest scientist/ science writer I can possibly be.

So screw it. YES WE CAN draft cogent reviews of the neurourological literature.

Yeah, that's my research area. Shut up. ;)
posted by palmcorder_yajna at 10:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [18 favorites]


I think I can finally sleep soundly tonight.
posted by matty at 10:22 PM on November 4, 2008


I was just watching CNN talk about the Cathedral and Bazaar.

? Please, summarize. It sounds like an interesting take on things.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:22 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh, and besides, for this country just the election of a man with dark skin is a huge epic thing. It's depressing that it's so important, but important it is. Across our country, millions of young African-American children finally have proof that the majority of America wants to see them succeed.

hell, for me, that's more important than all the rest, you know?
posted by davejay at 10:22 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


The nightmare is over - no more Palin posts!
posted by daniel_charms at 10:23 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hmm...maybe if I try to go to sleep, I'll wake up and find I'm still married....
posted by troybob at 10:25 PM on November 4, 2008


Unspeakably happy.
posted by Cygnet at 10:25 PM on November 4, 2008


California likely to follow.

Not really, no. And we'll thank you not to put is in the same sentence with those other two places.
posted by drjimmy11 at 10:26 PM on November 4, 2008


It may be 1:30 AM where I am, but I swear, I can see a new dawn...
posted by seldom seen cid at 10:26 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done, and congratulations, President Obama.
posted by orange swan at 10:27 PM on November 4, 2008


shouting out from Richmond VA, where there was some dancing in the streets after a long day of volunteering! power to the people!
posted by tarantula at 10:27 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


HOLY SHIT!
posted by monkeymike at 10:28 PM on November 4, 2008


I am sitting here in a blur of happiness and utter exhaustion. I have been holding my breath (metaphorically) for days (years?) now. We fucking did it! We actually did it.

(from the National)
I won't fuck us over, I'm Mr. November
I'm Mr. November, I won't fuck us over
posted by reallymadcow at 10:28 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


hey even prop 1 passed :P

cheers!
posted by kliuless at 10:28 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes! I can see it too!
but then it's 7:30 am here
posted by jouke at 10:28 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm so, so happy for you guys. I haven't been able to tear myself away from the TV for 6 hours. I hadn't realised how much of a leveller this election has been - Jesse Jackson, Oprah, all those guys, caught up in a throng of a million people, in that emotion. Well, John Bolton seemed immune on the BBC panel, but hey.

Congratulations, and the very best of luck.
posted by topynate at 10:28 PM on November 4, 2008


In Swahili, Barack means "blessing".
posted by ageispolis at 10:29 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Dearest Obama,

Twice have I voted for you.
Now the Senate and House back you.
Even my homestate
Indiana back'd you
Please, with this mandade
Don't let us down.
posted by paisley henosis at 10:29 PM on November 4, 2008


Stay classy, John Derbyshire.

Congratulations, America!
posted by The Card Cheat at 10:29 PM on November 4, 2008


One thing from Obama's speech that left me teary-eyed is that he is the first President in this country's history who has treated America's cultural diversity as its strength, and the treatment of our diverse citizens as a measure of the country's moral compass.

No other President has ever dared to publicly vocalize his view that gays and lesbians are as much American — perhaps as much a human being — as any other.

It's hard to know what promises will be kept and broken by the Obama administration in the days and months and years to come. It seems likely that a majority of Californians have today taken rights away from their fellow citizens, for example, as much as that hurts in light of the massive progress we've made tonight as a species. One would hope Obama would not take the wrong lesson from that regression.

But at the very least, the one individual who is our representative to the world, the bearer of our county's narrative, has spoken on record tonight about what we might aspire to be.

We'll celebrate tonight, but let us all hope Obama can keep inspiring us to stop treating our fellow Americans like second-class citizens and sub-humans. The fight has only begun.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:30 PM on November 4, 2008 [19 favorites]


As mygothlaundry said above, looks like North Carolina went for Obama albeit narrowly. I see Obama won both our counties. Yay, proud of my state, I'm glad I got to help some. So tired...great night.
posted by marxchivist at 10:30 PM on November 4, 2008


Thank you
posted by Dumsnill at 10:30 PM on November 4, 2008


I give him one year before everyone hates him.

You heard it here first.
posted by Mr.Encyclopedia at 10:30 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


During Obama's acceptance speech I actually pinched my arm to make sure I wasn't dreaming.
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 10:31 PM on November 4, 2008


WelcomBackAmerica.org
posted by Rhaomi at 10:31 PM on November 4, 2008


I just got a nice email from the campaign (from "Barack" -- will he have to stop signing his emails to us that way when he's President? It seems a little informal), and it included this line:

We have a lot of work to do to get our country back on track, and I'll be in touch soon about what comes next.

"I'll be in touch soon about what comes next."

I'm really hoping they use this enormous network they've built and do something interesting with it.
posted by anastasiav at 10:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]




My children grew up during one of the country's worst tragedies, I am so glad that today they witness a historic victory.
posted by keli at 10:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


I find it interesting that some people find this fact unbearable and fail to understand that the basic promises of America, what it represents, is a threat to ancient evil that lurks in the dark corners in this planet.

Hey, leave Canada out of this!

We're mostly just pissed about the softwood lumber. And for overwhelming our English language movies and tvs with your damn high production values and talented (often Canadian) creators and performers. Oh yeah, and for sending Republican aparachiks to train the Reform party - but we can forgive that (a bit) now (we still have the Reform).

But to be honest, I don't really understand what stavros is claiming, unless he's much older than me (I'm 31). I should say that I now live in the US, and really respect Americans and American history and culture - but I grew up thinking of as the US as that big place with lots of guns who wanted to dictate policy to the rest of the world. Maybe I listened to too much political comedy on the radio when I was only about 11 - Air Farce (which was funny then) had a wicked take on Reagan. My country has many warts - and I learn more every year. So please don't take it personally if I say with honesty that America was also depicted with warts when I was a child.

-------

My husband has pointed out the bad side to this all. Now that there is an African-American president, something bad is going to happen - like an asteroid hitting or aliens invading.
posted by jb at 10:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


Well done America!!! I knew you had it in you.
posted by AzzaMcKazza at 10:32 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done America, let's hope the promises this victory holds become reality.
posted by Duke999R at 10:32 PM on November 4, 2008


Fireworks in Seattle, Capitol Hill district, around Pine and Broadway. Helocopter overhead.
posted by amuseDetachment at 10:33 PM on November 4, 2008


People in Boston and Cambridge are roving in packs through the streets, screaming deliriously. Cars are going through intersections with horns blaring, a jubilant conversation in traffic. It's like the Sox won the World Series or something.

Waiting in front of Symphony Hall for the bus, a taxi driver pulled up to us and asked if my friend and I were going to Cambridge. We eyeballed him suspiciously for a second and asked why, and he said, "I don't care who you voted for. Free ride tonight." So we hopped in and listened to President-elect Obama[1]'s speech on the radio as the driver maneuvered carefully around throngs of marauding Northeastern students.

When we got to the Central Square cab stand, I asked the driver again if I couldn't give him even a little bit of money. He gestured at the radio and said, "In this man's name, no money." I told him I'd give him a hug, and he just laughed and said he'd save that for next time. We shook hands instead and I got out of the cab, feeling as though I were stepping out into a new world.

[1] HELLS YES.
posted by jesourie at 10:34 PM on November 4, 2008 [18 favorites]


HANDJOBS FOR EVERYBODY
posted by Citizen Premier at 10:35 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


HANDJOBS FOR EVERYBODY

HELLS YES
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Wow! I am wonderment! I don't care if if he falls in the mud! Everything is better just for having gone there!

Can we go back to French Fries now, no more Freedom Fries????
posted by MsCoco@6:58 at 10:36 PM on November 4, 2008


five fresh fish: ? Please, summarize. It sounds like an interesting take on things.

I didn't hear them talking about it, but it would've been interesting. The Cathedral and The Bazaar is one of the more important and interesting essays on computing of the last decade; it was written by Eric S. Raymond in 1996. Nerd stuff, really, but very good.

posted by koeselitz at 10:37 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh thank God. This is such great news, America has done a great thing and I look forward to it moving out of the mire of the last eight years. I'm so happy right now.
posted by TheDonF at 10:38 PM on November 4, 2008




From fivethirtyeight.com:
Indiana: The outstanding vote is in Lake, Jasper and Allen. Jasper is more pronounced McCain right now, at 59-40. But the county is very small, and 72% precincts reporting. Allen is narrowly McCain, and not anywhere close enough to flip the roughly 23,000 votes by which Obama leads. Lake, a hugely Democratic county, still has a few precincts out.

We always had a good feeling about Indiana when we saw it in our travels. This was a state where Obama had the ground game all to himself. With us predicting a slight win for McCain in the state, but no ground game taken into effect, and with a late minute canvassing push from FiveThirtyEight in Gary, Indiana looks like it'll go Obama.
There's also a beautiful picture of a guy and some kids canvassing in Gary earlier today.
posted by web-goddess at 10:38 PM on November 4, 2008


But to be honest, I don't really understand what stavros is claiming, unless he's much older than me (I'm 31).

Well, at 43, I'm somewhat older than you. But I'm not claiming anything, nor am I speaking for anyone but myself. My comments were strictly about my own personal feelings about America, which are in a happy turmoil today, and nothing else, other than that I share the hopes of many for a better future.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 10:39 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I give him one year before everyone hates him.

That's depressing to think about, but I do remember seeing the media turn against Clinton for almost no reason early in his presidency. Dunno why, perhaps it just sells more papers if you make everyone out to be incompetent, while the real incompetents (Bush administration) can get away with anything.

I fully expect the media to crucify him and loudmouth GOP operatives getting more airtime than is justifiable, but I seriously doubt "everyone" will hate him. The media will just be trying to sell that impression.

My worst fear, and this really transcends who is in office, is that our major problems are 100% unsolvable. If there is no solution to the economic crisis or global warming then we're going to have to tough it out. Most likely history will blame Obama/Biden for failing to fix the unfixable.
posted by damn dirty ape at 10:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Just a word of warning, don't go to a certain site that rhymes with "Brie Republic" unless you want to puke.
posted by Saxon Kane at 10:40 PM on November 4, 2008


Yay, US!

see what I did there?
posted by Pecinpah at 10:40 PM on November 4, 2008


congrats guys!!

The cycle of this pisses me off, though: in boom times people get greedy and selfish and the right ascends. After it fucks everything up, the left has to come in and fix it.

Obama made a wonderful, beautiful speech tonight, but he had to talk of healing divides and finding unity and the huge challenges ahead. He has to pick up the pieces from destruction wreaked by a moron. Imagine what he could have done if he had what was given to Bush in 2000. I only hope that when he succeeds and America is triumphant again the voters remember how they got there.
posted by bonaldi at 10:40 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


EPIC WIN
posted by BillBishop at 10:40 PM on November 4, 2008


WooHoo! Can you get to that?
posted by Sailormom at 10:41 PM on November 4, 2008


Fireworks in Seattle, Capitol Hill district, around Pine and Broadway. Helocopter overhead.
posted by amuseDetachment at 12:33 AM on November 5 [+] [!]


I can hear it down here on First Hill. Amazing. Still watching Prop 8. But, hey, Tim Eyeman's thing was voted down! That counts for something, right?
posted by gc at 10:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This! THIS is what we think of when we think of the country we are proud of!

Yes we have!
posted by bink at 10:41 PM on November 4, 2008


When, during the speech, he belted out "All Americans, male or female, young and not so young, black or white or hispanic or asian, gay or straight, disabled and not disabled" I thought it was impossible. It's an action hero speech, a rah rah we defeated the aliens speech, a pre-end-credit-and-swelling-music speech. No politician would actually say that. Not now. not in our poisonous, petty, fetid little cycle.

I was so happy when it didn't fade to black and give a director credit.

Can't wait for the sequel.
posted by The Whelk at 10:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


P.S

RAH RAH!
posted by The Whelk at 10:42 PM on November 4, 2008




As an American living in Europe, I just want to know: Does this mean I don't have to apologize for being American anymore?
posted by ValkoSipuliSuola at 10:43 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Must... fight tears with... what little snarkiness I have left...



RON PAUL '08 AMIRITE



Well, thank goodness that didn't work.
posted by Slothrup at 10:44 PM on November 4, 2008


I've had a shitty couple of months, a time period that has left me feeling like there is absolutely no hope for anyone's future, that nothing will ever be okay. I went through the motions at the voting booth last week - it's not that my heart wasn't in the election, but rather my heart's been incapable of being into anything at all.

then...

I found myself saying the word 'awesome' more times tonight than I did in my entire time in junior high and high school combined.

Awesome.

Awesome.

Awesome.

Awesome.

Awesome.

Awesome.

Awesome.

AWESOME!!!


I love the U.S.A. and it feels damn good. I love this motherfucking awesome place.
posted by item at 10:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


If I were American I would have voted for Obama without a second thought. He is by any metric the best choice for President the US has had in decades.

The cynic in me is a little scared, though. This feels like the Hoover -> FDR transition. And FDR made a damn good job of being President, turned an isolationist USA into a United Nations interventionist type and put Americans back on their feet.

So what did the next Republican Presidents do? Swivel the 'interventionist' thing around to preserve the Monroe Doctrine and to expand corporate interests militarily.

So I look forward to the next 4 years. But the cynic in me is scared about what comes for a resurgent America after that.
posted by adricv at 10:44 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


BEST THING EVER
posted by snuffleupagus at 10:45 PM on November 4, 2008


Epic thread, epic night, so damn happy.

For me, it boils down to this: Hope over Fear.

I can't begin to express how thrilled it makes me to see that Hope won tonight. Something in the world - in me - has been restored. It's been dearly missed.
posted by kokogiak at 10:46 PM on November 4, 2008


But, hey, Tim Eyeman's thing was voted down! That counts for something, right?

Is that the traffic initiative? I don't get that. Encourage people to drive more and make traffic worse?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:46 PM on November 4, 2008


Know who else had a puppy?
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 10:46 PM on November 4, 2008


MY HEART IS FULL
posted by changeling at 10:47 PM on November 4, 2008


OBAMA '43 -- The Interregnum is OVER!
posted by RavinDave at 10:48 PM on November 4, 2008


Wow, The Onion had to dig deep to find such cynical, joyless takes on this historic election.
posted by nanojath at 10:49 PM on November 4, 2008


White House dot gov has nothing on this, what the hell??
posted by Dragonness at 10:49 PM on November 4, 2008


To paraphrase our president-elect, this moment is not enough. But it is where we start.

It's a pretty awesome start.
posted by transient at 10:49 PM on November 4, 2008


Fireworks, horns honking, cheers from cyclists - SE Portland is going nuts in its own semi-sedate way. Just waiting on the Merkley/Smith Senate race results and Prop. 8 down in CA before calling it a night. Glad Washington (apparently) is keeping it's Democrat governor. Really effing glad Obama won. Sometime between 6 and 8 years ago I remarked to a friend that, if an African American was elected President in my lifetime, it would be - HAVE to be - a Republican. Crow never tasted better.
posted by joseph_elmhurst at 10:50 PM on November 4, 2008


People are parading with drums and tambourines here.

"Wake up! Obama is the next president!"

I am so happy and for the first time in my life I feel a sense of love and pride in my country. There is an actual possibility that each and every one of us can make a difference. My hope is that Obama will harness that huge energy into greater good. For tonight I am happy.

Everyone ---> Please don't forget to focus on the local, that is where you have the most immediate effect. The voluntarism in this election has been like never before we must take it to the schools, shelters, and all those in need if we are able.
posted by emypocu at 10:50 PM on November 4, 2008


LITERALLY DANCING IN THE STREETS! AMERICA - FUCK YEAH! (SERIOUSLY.)
posted by Football Bat at 10:50 PM on November 4, 2008


What can I say? My eyes moistened when they announced the victory.

I have wondered what it would be like to have a truly inspirational and great leader of such a remarkable nation, and I have a feeling that I am going to find out.
posted by tomble at 10:50 PM on November 4, 2008


Indiana just flipped blue on Google's election map with 99% of precincts reporting.
posted by PenDevil at 10:50 PM on November 4, 2008


effing apostrophe
posted by joseph_elmhurst at 10:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Just a word of warning, don't go to a certain site that rhymes with "Brie Republic" unless you want to puke.

A Christian wingnut board I frequent has people threatening to buy guns, leave the country, etc.etc.

Are the proud vegetables of brie republic forming militias, wearing colander helmets and cautiously peering out of their storm cellars for signs of muslin invaders?
posted by fleetmouse at 10:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


I have a palpable feeling of relief. It's silly, because your President's idiocy didn't really affect me a whole lot on a personal level (save destroying my retirement funds).

But I guess there's been about seven years of continual background fear in my mind, wondering whether the Bush Administration would destroy us all. An ever-present worry about increasing war, endless denial of climate change issues, the threat of fascism taking over the country which borders mine, even the threat of nuclear war at some points.

I'm hopeful the nightmare is coming to an end. Heck, I'm feeling hope about America! That's remarkable in and of itself.

I can't even begin to imagine what an enormous relief it is to most Americans. Super-emotional, I'm sure.

Congratulations and thank-you. Continue to fight the wingnut brigade: America can regain its standing in the world!
posted by five fresh fish at 10:51 PM on November 4, 2008


YES WE CAN HAS
posted by sister nunchaku of love and mercy at 10:52 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


We could have saved ourselves a lot of anxiety and known ahead of time that Obama was going to win. A friend of mine pointed out that by November 2, more people searched Google for "Barack Obama" than for "Free Porn." You know you're a winner when you are more popular than free porn. [via]
posted by marxchivist at 10:52 PM on November 4, 2008 [39 favorites]


A member of a racial minority, son of an immigrant, coming from a unusual family, with a foreign "threatening" name, elected president. Nowhere else this could have happened - literally, this is an ONLY IN AMERICA moment.

I realise this is talking the language of American exceptionalism, and therefore should be taken with a grain of salt, and not to diminish the special significance the Obama victory has for the US and the West, but your assertion that this could happen nowhere else in the world is literally not true. Racial minorities have been elected leaders in plenty of countries around the world including Peru, Jamaica, India, France and even my own country New Zealand, which so far has had a Jewish Prime Minister and a Maori Deputy PM (no Maori PM as yet, but yes, I'm quite certain it could happen.)
posted by dydecker at 10:52 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


First (Australian Prime Minister) Rudd and now Obama. The people are finally realising that it's good to have smart people in power!
posted by Lucie at 10:53 PM on November 4, 2008


So let's get this straight America ... a few thousand of your citizens are killed .... so you invade a country and cause the death of hundreds of thousands of innocent people who just wanted a peaceful life and were minding their own business ..... so you vote a nice young black man in ... and you can feel good about yourselves again and all is forgiven?

I don't think so. Oh and let's not forget - almost half of your population wanted to vote the Republicans back in after the damage done during this eight years.

Staggering.

Truly staggering.
posted by DirtyCreature at 10:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


Hey, what's that rumbling sound?

LANDSLIDE!
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 10:54 PM on November 4, 2008


But, hey, Tim Eyeman's thing was voted down! That counts for something, right?

Is that the traffic initiative? I don't get that. Encourage people to drive more and make traffic worse?


Exactly. Fuck Tim Eyeman. He's a moron, and every one of his initiatives that have passed have hurt Washington state.

I'm really happy that all the Washington initiative votes went my way. That's different. Now if we can avoid having Governor Rossi...
posted by Caduceus at 10:54 PM on November 4, 2008


There's a huge party going on at Pike and Broadway here in Seattle. I've never been a part of anything like this before.
posted by gc at 10:56 PM on November 4, 2008


DAMN IT, CALIFORNIA. I'm not going to sleep until there's a definite result on Prop 8.

It's not looking good: Prop. 8 Ban On Same-Sex Marriage Leading
posted by homunculus at 10:56 PM on November 4, 2008


Cnn.com reporting Indiana for Obama with 100% reporting.

I honestly never thought I would live to see the day.
posted by paisley henosis at 10:57 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


You know what just occurred to me? Somewhere, at this very moment, Rush Limbaugh is smiling and lighting a big cigar whilst Sean Hannity gives him a reach-around. This is the best possible outcome for the two of them. Rush hasn't been able to get a proper hate on since Clinton left office. I predict a double digit bump in Limbaugh's ratings.
posted by MikeMc at 10:59 PM on November 4, 2008


Sitting in a bar in Guatemala, people won't shut up for his acceptance speech, but a few of us new-met strangers blubbering at the closed captions because we can finally be proud of our country again.

It's been so long.
posted by gottabefunky at 11:00 PM on November 4, 2008


Ah, I wish I were back in the States to celebrate. But it was pretty epic to arrive in time for Obama's acceptance speech, and watch it on a huge projection in an auditorium. Not many people here on my campus, but we're going out to the city tonight, to an Irish Pub in Chiang Mai to celebrate.

! I feel pretty darn happy.
posted by one teak forest at 11:01 PM on November 4, 2008


Electoral-wise, even at 3/5 a vote for Obama--he still won.

Oh, yes!
posted by sourwookie at 11:03 PM on November 4, 2008


so you vote a nice young black man in ... and you can feel good about yourselves again and all is forgiven?

I don't think so.


And who is supposed to care what you think at this point? Please be specific.
posted by MikeMc at 11:03 PM on November 4, 2008 [12 favorites]


Well done, USA!
posted by bouvin at 11:03 PM on November 4, 2008


WHERE, paisley henosis? I can't see it! I need to see it with my own eyes to believe it...
posted by web-goddess at 11:04 PM on November 4, 2008


Sweet blessed zombie jesus, thank you.
posted by aramaic at 11:05 PM on November 4, 2008


I've been reading this thread over at Little Green Footballs, where they're claiming Obama illegally "bought" the election and quoting Winston Churchill's "we will never surrender" speech. Heh.
posted by orange swan at 11:05 PM on November 4, 2008


ATTENTION SEATTLE MEFITES.

I just returned from the Pike/Pine corridor. Unfortunately the flu got the better of me and the Missus so we had to bail after what was an exciting and spontaneous show of mass love by the happy people of Seattle. We were kissed and hugged and flashed boobies and bought drinks by strangers. It is awesome!


SO LISTEN TO ME NOW: If you are single, young, and living in Seattle and wish to get very well laid on a historic night I strongly suggest you put down what ever you are doing and go there immediately. There are thousands of like minded people gathering. You young people better go and capture this night for yourselves. If you don't you may well regret it for the rest of your lives. GO!
posted by tkchrist at 11:05 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


Here in New Mexico where Obama won the state and all of our Senate and House seats are now held by Democrats.

I have to say I'm pretty happy to be so blue.
posted by jabo at 11:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Electoral-vote.com has a rundown of the popular vote for president, and Ron Paul's got a total 13,961 votes, which is currently fewer than Alan Keyes. So much for all those "money bombs".
posted by The Card Cheat at 11:06 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Truly staggering.
posted by DirtyCreature at 12:53 AM on November 5 [+] [!]


I never thought I'd say it, but - eponysterical. Give us more than a couple of hours, DirtyCreature. A whole lot of us are - honestly - doing our best.
posted by nanojath at 11:07 PM on November 4, 2008


Blessed are you, Spirit of all that is, who has brought us to this great day!
posted by ottereroticist at 11:08 PM on November 4, 2008


So let's get this straight America ... a few thousand of your citizens are killed .... so you invade a country and cause the death of hundreds of thousands of innocent people who just wanted a peaceful life and were minding their own business ..... so you vote a nice young black man in ... and you can feel good about yourselves again and all is forgiven?

I don't think so. Oh and let's not forget - almost half of your population wanted to vote the Republicans back in after the damage done during this eight years.

Staggering.

Truly staggering.


Cynical much? I suppose you like to lecture kids on how ice-cream is just the tool of the oppressive dairy-cartels.

Lighten up you joyless fuck
posted by JustAsItSounds at 11:08 PM on November 4, 2008 [30 favorites]


I encourage everyone to spend the next 76 days, 9 hours smacking freepers upside the head with clue-by-fours.

If America's going to pull out of its swan dive, it's going to require everyone pulling together. Don't let the freeper loons fuck it up.
posted by five fresh fish at 11:09 PM on November 4, 2008


Here's a little video I put together as reminder of how we got here (in the short term): The Last 100 Days.
posted by rmannion at 11:09 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Bronx created Hip-Hop! Chicago created Obama! And I know where he was born so please don't trip!! Thank every last on of you who voted for the man!
posted by Flex1970 at 11:09 PM on November 4, 2008


Oh good, so we no longer have to despise Americans and hold their leadership in contempt.

Just like about 70% of all Australians, I congratulate America on this wonderful election result. The rest of the world could not tolerate another 4 or 8 years of Bush-style politics.
posted by Mokusatsu at 11:10 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Truly staggering.

DirtyCreature, I'm trying to figure out what the fuck you actually want.
posted by maxwelton at 11:11 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


Thankyou. This is a country and a people that I can believe in again. Citizenship application is on its way.
posted by azlondon at 11:11 PM on November 4, 2008



I've been reading this thread over at Little Green Footballs, where they're claiming Obama illegally "bought" the election and quoting Winston Churchill's "we will never surrender" speech. Heh.


To his credit, the creator of the thread seems sincere and respectful. Props.
posted by Lemurrhea at 11:11 PM on November 4, 2008


eek, those folks at LGF aren't right in the head.

orange swan I hope you're giving those socks to an American friend!
posted by zarah at 11:12 PM on November 4, 2008


Does anyone has a link to any Republican self-pity? I'm in the mood for some schadenfreude.
posted by dydecker at 11:12 PM on November 4, 2008


Holy shit. Indiana really has gone blue.
posted by fluffy battle kitten at 11:12 PM on November 4, 2008


If only I could forget Obama's vote to grant immunity to the telecoms who spied on us. Oh well, here's hoping he's actually different than the rest.
posted by jsonic at 8:04 PM on November 4


You and the other single-issue voters can eat shit. By the time his term is over, President Obama will probably piss me off a few dozen times. But his job isn't to make me happy. His job is to be the President. Those things are going to conflict sometimes.

And because of that, you want to throw away the small but real gains we could have over the next four years out of spite over one of hundreds of issues facing us? Don't ever try to tell me you're any different from the anti-choice voters or the RON PAUL GOLD STANDARD nuts.

We elected a good man tonight. An imperfect man, but a good one. And I think we owe him the benefit of the doubt.
posted by Optimus Chyme at 11:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [55 favorites]


Sorry to rain on your parade people, but big chunks of this world hated the US

Yeah, but that has more to do with dick comments like:

Nowhere else this could have happened - literally, this is an ONLY IN AMERICA moment.

...than anything else. Why do you want to hurt America?
posted by rodgerd at 11:13 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This is one phenomenal community organizer.
posted by Neiltupper at 11:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


I'm not optimistic about Obama as President. But I do hope that he rises above my expectations and doesn't screw our country over.

Best wishes, Barack.
posted by davidmsc at 11:14 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


ONLY IN AMERICA COULD AN AMERICAN CITIZEN BE ELECTED PRESIDENT OF AMERICA
posted by Citizen Premier at 11:15 PM on November 4, 2008 [23 favorites]


And can I just say "I told you so?"

To konolia, MetaMan, et al:
Yes ... I realize it is considered poor form for me to bring up MeFites who have not (as of yet) participated in this thread. But, after two years of debate with you (and others of your ilk), please permit some of us to gloat, albeit a bit drunken, in tonight's achievement: a majority support for an African-American, liberal, Democratic President-elect to lead us forward in this 21st Century.

The God of the Majority Has Spoken. And His Name is Obama!!!
Your thoughts, feelings and reactions to this development. Most appreciated.
posted by ericb at 11:16 PM on November 4, 2008


and you can feel good about yourselves again and all is forgiven?

The people you're talking to here suffered more the last 8 years than you did, I'd wager, so please kindly shut it about your refusal to "forgive us."
posted by Solon and Thanks at 11:16 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


A Christian wingnut board I frequent has people threatening to buy guns, leave the country, etc.etc.

Now they know how I have been feeling for the last 8 years. I don't mean to be rude... but Suck It.
posted by jopreacher at 11:17 PM on November 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


yay!
posted by cmicali at 11:18 PM on November 4, 2008


Well done America. Now you have a hope of getting things back to how they should be. This Australian is very excited to be able to watch America with cheerful interest, rather than disbelieving horror.

Obama has my best wishes. That man has a hell of a lot of work to do and a pressing need to do it all so soon.
posted by Jilder at 11:19 PM on November 4, 2008


DirtyCreature, I'm trying to figure out what the fuck you actually want.

Oh. He wants a friend. A friend to share his deep important insights with. Over coffee. Then at an awkward pause in the conversation he can then show this friend his collection of child autopsy and cancer biopsy medical journal photos. To, like, bring 'em back down to reality, MAN!

And his new friend just stares for a moment. And his new freind says they have to make a call. And the new friend doesn't come back. Like all his other new freinds.

COME BACK FRIEND! COME BACK!
posted by tkchrist at 11:19 PM on November 4, 2008 [7 favorites]


ONLY IN AMERICA COULD AN AMERICAN CITIZEN BE ELECTED PRESIDENT OF AMERICA

ONLY IN AMERICA COULD AMERICAN AMERICA AMERICA!

IN CONCLUSION: WHAT A RELIEF THAT THEY AMERICOULD
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 11:20 PM on November 4, 2008 [6 favorites]


99% of the precincts reporting in Missouri and a McCain has a 402 vote lead.
posted by PenDevil at 11:20 PM on November 4, 2008


~ WHERE, paisley henosis? I can't see it! I need to see it with my own eyes to believe it...

NYTimes.com, 'state winners' on the flash element.

I can hardly believe it myself.
posted by paisley henosis at 11:20 PM on November 4, 2008


Thank you, SpaceKitty.
posted by MaxK at 11:21 PM on November 4, 2008


I just got back in from the rally in Grant Park. All I can say is wow. That was awesome.
posted by MrBobaFett at 11:23 PM on November 4, 2008


I encourage everyone to spend the next 76 days, 9 hours smacking freepers upside the head with clue-by-fours. thinking real damn hard about how to ignore the bullshit static and think instead about how we can make real, important shit happen. This is not a motherfucking drill. Sober up, be hungover, and start thinking tomorrow about making a wonderful victory into a real, honest, campaign for positive change in this world. Fucking-A Yes We Can.
posted by nanojath at 11:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [13 favorites]


Well, at 43, I'm somewhat older than you.

Ah, you remember Carter. I wish I did - I was just too young, and didn't really learn who he was until recently. And everything more I learn about him, the more impressed I am. But the only president I knew as a child was Reagan - and after what he said about welfare queens, you can imagine he wasn't too popular in our social assistance dependant household. (That welfare got my mom a high school diploma and now she's a well-employed bookkeeper, and me a good childhood so I could get a degree. It was a good investment.)
posted by jb at 11:24 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


maxwelton: "DirtyCreature, I'm trying to figure out what the fuck you actually want."

Thanks for asking. How about the nice young black man and his shiny new administration agreeing to submit the former administration to an international court of justice.... allowing war crimes charges to be assessed on merits against members of that adminstration and agreeing to pay reparations. You know ... kinda like they did in Germany when they killed lots of innocent people? How would an obesity and excessive wealth tax to pay for reparations go down do you think?
posted by DirtyCreature at 11:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Halfway through the precincts, Ted Stevens is winning.

I almost want him to win, just to watch the vote in the Senate.

"Motion to expel Sen. Ted Stevens from the United States Senate"
posted by Lemurrhea at 11:25 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


At Seattle pike and broadway street party still going on. Gurillea fireworks and cheap champagne all over the place over 2 sq blocks, better be walking here , roads blocked and buses rerouted
posted by amuseDetachment at 11:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Much of Obama's win can be attributed to the youth 18-29 getting out to vote.

It's interesting, that one. The under-thirties, on exit polling, were all Obama even in many Republican states like Texas.
posted by rodgerd at 11:26 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


And on a sadder, glummer, note, I have to say: I am monumentally bummed that I do not get to hear what Dr. Hunter S. Thompson has to say about our little electoral upset tonight. I pray my primitive religionist views are correct - in which case you are smiling down on us from a 3 story bed of consequence-free, heavenly blow and rum.
posted by nanojath at 11:28 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


When you all start to pay the trillions in reparations you owe to the rest of the world, then you people can start singing your sickening chant.
posted by DirtyCreature at 9:01 PM on November 4


Hey, DirtyCreature is back. How are your investments coming?

Oh, not so good.

Well, surely your earthquake predictions panned out, right? No? You are either a troll or you are mentally ill and you should seek professional help. In your rebuttal, don't forget to be QUOTING SCIENCE like your last insane flameout where you said you would never come back.
posted by Optimus Chyme at 11:28 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


You and the other single-issue voters can eat shit.

A-fucking-men. Quoted for truth.

Mindless cynicism is, guess what? Mindless. Ooo, look, I'm more cynical than everyone else! That must mean I'm smarter, right?

Boo-fucking-hoo, life isn't perfect. People die. Bad things happen. Things don't always go the way you planned. How can this possibly surprise anyone?

The soul which cannot appreciate an improvement, because it is merely an improvement and not a perfection, is a soul which is doomed.

Perfection is stasis. Stasis is death.
posted by aramaic at 11:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I celebrated Obama's victory in Mexico City. We know we'll still be fucked by whatever happens in the US, but maybe, this time, it won't be that bad.
posted by clearlydemon at 11:31 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Don't know if anyone else has pointed this out, but another nice feature of Obama's victory is that he has far more EV's than Bush did in either of his wins, and (currently) a larger percentage of the popular vote (52% at the moment) than Bush ever got. Don't know if he'll get past Bush's 62 million votes in 2004, though. One more goal to aim for...

*off to bed*
posted by The Card Cheat at 11:31 PM on November 4, 2008


Man, good job everybody. I just marched, yes, marched, with two thousand or so University of Vermont students. I had a cozy booth at my favorite bar and my crew, and the entire bar were cheering whenever a state went blue. Good times, too much beer, it was great.

Then, suddenly, McCain was standing in front of a podium and the bar went dead silent.

"No way." My pal, who had just arrived, said.

"Concession." Someone else said. And the bar went wild with "shhhh" and "shut up."

In fact, there were so many shushes and shut ups that I couldn't actually hear anything McCain said. Then CNN popped up a caption. I don't know what it actually said, but the word 'concession' appeared, and the bar erupted. Then, as we cheered and shouted "USA! USA!" the flood started. Down the hill from the University of Vermont, came a flood of students and faculty and drunkass punks, just like those of us at my bar, they were crazy-excited.

It was like a revolution. I forgot about my credit card, held behind the bar, and packed right full of the beer I and my friends had already consumed, and I charged out into the street. We gathered, thousands in downtown Burlington, Vermont and cheered.

Then the march began. These thousands walked down Church street and up Main, literally marching over cars that were stuck at stop lights, both red and green, unable to move through the current of students andd townies, all of them terribly excited to have a respectable president. One that could string together a sentence.

"USA! USA! USA!" They cheered.
"O-BA-MA! O-BA-MA!" They cheered.
"Yes! We! Can!" They cheered.
"Yes! We! Did!" They chanted.

I'm five years out of college, but I was cheering and marching with these students. In fact, my cheeks are sore now because of my huge smile. We ended on the campus of UVM, and everyone there, all the punkass kids and students and hippies and yuppies and hipsters and we all sang the national anthem as cars finally made it through the crows, all of them honking for Obama.

Then I marched right back downtown with the rest of them, intending to collect my card and head home, instead I stayed with them, buying beer and cheering everyone on. Good job! I said, good job electing this guy. We won.

Good God, I've never been happier or more optimisitic for our country.

Everything's awesome. I'm going to bed.
posted by The Man from Lardfork at 11:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [10 favorites]


I do love the election, the preseident and his sweet speeches, but it's amazing how quick people are with the patriotic adoration.

What does "a sense of love and pride in my country" feel like? I'm from an old European country. I've always been shown that only racists are patriotic, and all feelings of national pride must be instantly accompanied by a recitation of all the war crimes ever committed by people from my country, the prejudices still to come and the venal worthlessness of the current regime. As a liberal, I believe this intrinsically. How do Americans stay so self-adoring? (I'm not being snide, but I really want to know. Where's the self-loathing?)

Our next main election will feature two unlikeable, slimy, untrustworthy liars we are already sick of fighting over who can give the bigots in a few key areas the biggest tax breaks.

(Naturally I'm jealous)
posted by grapefruitzzz at 11:32 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


My town voted in favor of Obama by a count of 2008-1889 a close victory, but 2008 votes for him, in 2008, coincidence or awesomeness?
posted by lilkeith07 at 11:34 PM on November 4, 2008


Frederick Douglass
Robert Hayden

When it is finally Ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful
and terrible thing, needful to man as air,
usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all,
when it is truly Instinct, brain matter, diastole, systole,
reflex action; when it is finally won; when it is more
than the gaudy mumbo jumbo of politicians;
this man this Douglass, this former slave, this Negro
beaten to his knees, exiled, visioning a world
where none is lonely, none hunted, alien,
this man, superb in love and logic, this man
shall be remembered. Oh, not with statues' rhetoric,
not with legends and poems and wreaths of bronze alone,
but with the lives grown out of his life, the lives
fleshing his dream of the beautiful, needful thing.
posted by ronv at 11:35 PM on November 4, 2008 [9 favorites]


August 4th, 2009 is going to be a popular birthday.

Can we call all those new mothers the "Barack Omama's"?
posted by zueod at 11:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


How would an obesity and excessive wealth tax to pay for reparations go down do you think?

How about we not pay attention to your excessive and taxing trolling and move on.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:36 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


I'm really, really excited that Obama won.

And trying hard not to let my disappointment about AZ, FL, AR and maybe CA cast too much of a shadow.
posted by lullaby at 11:36 PM on November 4, 2008


It's interesting, that one. The under-thirties, on exit polling, were all Obama even in many Republican states like Texas.

I OFFICIALLY apologize to all the 20-something people I said wouldn't pull this thing off. Looks like you guys aren't nearly the fuck-ups we were when were your age. Way to go kids. You did real good. We owe you a big one.

I wish I wasn't sick because I would be buying you drinks tonight. If any of you Seattle young Obama folk run across me here on the Hill I promise I will buy you a drink.

The code word will be "Todd, You Beautiful Bastard, I Read Your Post."

posted by tkchrist at 11:37 PM on November 4, 2008


OMG.

The Freepers are getting all Red Dawn over there. Seriously, all Turner Diaries and stuff.

How stunted.
posted by sourwookie at 11:38 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


The Revolution WILL be televised!
posted by aclevername at 11:41 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


When I was younger, I would go into people's houses and see portraits of politicians. The Kennedy's often, especially in black houses, sometimes as part of a triptych that included Martin Luther King. Conservative houses often had Reagan, which I found bizarre and terrifying. But I could never imagine putting the image of a politician on my walls. It's not that I thought about it and rejected it; it's that it literally never occurred to me that this was a thing I might ever do.

I bought a portrait of Obama tonight, and will put it on my wall as soon as I get it. He may disappoint. I hope not. I can always take the picture down again if he does. But, for this moment, after eight years of feeling my country had gone down a terrible path, I finally have a president I feel is my president. And not because Obama perfectly represents me. He doesn't. But because I think he is a good man and a honest public servant, and, when we disagree, it will be an honest disagreement based in real facts that we both share and understand to be true. He will not make up his own facts for the sake of convenience, and he will not pursue a bad course of action out a doctrine. He will assemble experts and examine facts, and, when he makes a decision, it will be because he thinks that decision is for the good of the nation. That is what I am counting on him for. And if he does these things, his picture will always have a place of pride on my wall.
posted by Astro Zombie at 11:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [20 favorites]


College undergraduate checking in.

Just watched everything unfold with a group of 12 or so others. As soon as it became clear that Obama was, indeed, going to win, we swarmed the streets--screaming, chanting, hugging, crying--along with hundreds (at least) of other students. For most of us, this was our first time voting in an election; many of us were still in middle school when the twin towers fell. We've had a lot on our minds since then. I have it easy, and I've still been worrying about how I'm going to get a job in this economy when I graduate; whether my friends are going to end up in (or get out of) Iraq; if my best friend, who is gay, is going to be able to marry; whether I'm going to be protected, mental illnesses and all; whether I'm going to be in this all together with the world, whether one day I'm going to be able to truly believe in my government and actually feel proud to say that, yes, I am from the United States of America.

As someone who has cringed at the red, white, and blue which I have long associated with corruption and bigotry--my mind is blown. This is my generation. This was my very first time voting and I did something. WE did something. We informed ourselves; we got ourselves to the polls; we did something. And it felt good. It felt so goddamn good.

Watching Obama's speech, with all of us crying--and my best friend, in the middle of that, just smiling and saying aloud, "I'm going to get married"--and my other friend, sobbing because who would have ever thought, and if only his dad could be there tonight--and me, just blending in, holding hands, silently crying and watching it all because it is bigger than I ever imagined--because the problems we face are bigger than I can fathom--but for once, for once I feel hope and pride. I feel empowered.

I will never, ever miss another election. I've seen the power and meaning of one. And it delights me--and inspires me--to know that I am not the only young person to feel this way. Welcome, 21st century. The world won't change tomorrow, but it's going to change. And I think we can change it for the better.

I feel good tonight.
posted by Alligator at 11:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [30 favorites]


palinaspresident.com has been updated.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:42 PM on November 4, 2008 [5 favorites]


He will assemble experts and examine facts, and, when he makes a decision, it will be because he thinks that decision is for the good of the nation.

A-fucking-men! That is what I'm hoping for most of all.
posted by Caduceus at 11:44 PM on November 4, 2008


It feels so good and so intense and so emotional and so crazy to finally not be disappointed and punished for believing in something this strongly.
posted by lunit at 11:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I OFFICIALLY apologize to all the 20-something people I said wouldn't pull this thing off. Looks like you guys aren't nearly the fuck-ups we were when were your age. Way to go kids. You did real good. We owe you a big one.



Best gift would be to stop ladling national debt on the poor bastards.
posted by rodgerd at 11:45 PM on November 4, 2008 [4 favorites]


On a more serious note, this whole long campaign a poem has been in my mind, or rather Bruce Sterling's emotionally charged recitation of it at his State of the World talk in 2006. It's The People Yes by Carl Sandburg, though this is just an excerpt to evoke it to those who might know it already, or to encourage you to seek it out:

This old anvil laughs at many broken hammers.
There are men who can't be bought.
The fireborn are at home in fire.
The stars make no noise,
You can't hinder the wind from blowing.
Time is a great teacher.
Who can live without hope?

In the darkness with a great bundle of grief
the people march.
In the night, and overhead a shovel of stars for keeps, the people
march:
"Where to? what next?"

posted by zueod at 11:47 PM on November 4, 2008 [9 favorites]


Congratulations, my American cousins. Congratulations, and love.

I'm going to take a nap now.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 11:50 PM on November 4, 2008


Dallas, Texas went Obama. Wow. I am stunned and pleased.
posted by YoBananaBoy at 11:50 PM on November 4, 2008


I work in a sleepy little suburban library in Victoria, Australia. At some time between 3 and 4 o'lock this afternoon, one of our librarians recieved a text message telling us that Obama had won. In the process of telling everyone on staff, my very excitable co-worker yelled across the library to those who were on the other side, "It's Obama!" - and hearing her, so many our of customers came up to the desk to ask "by how much?" and say things like "phew!". Old folks, teenagers, recent immigrants, 6th generation Australians, uni students, mothers with their children. In our tiny community library, on the other side of the world.
posted by sleep_walker at 11:50 PM on November 4, 2008 [14 favorites]


Yesterday I cast a vote for the first time in my adult life, because there was a candidate I wasn't ashamed to call a leader for the first time in my adult life. And he won.

We've got a fucking long way to go yet.

I'm going to miss the Palin posts
posted by Ryvar at 11:50 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


It was a pretty great speech, but I'm not gonna lie: The best part was standing in that crowd when CNN called the election for Obama. One network calling it is fairly meaningless. But the collective joy was tremendous + genuinely affecting.

I thought McCain was very gracious in losing, as was LOLbama.

Indi-fucking-ana got this one right? I'm shocked.

I missed the live Daily/Colbert thing, which is really the only bad thing about today. Luckily it will be on Hulu and/or torrentz later.

Free Republic is melting down.

I feel pretty great.

Smoke if you got 'em.
posted by sparkletone at 11:51 PM on November 4, 2008 [2 favorites]


“People were saying, "That guy's going to be President one day. You can tell."”

Yep. Met him a while back. Shook his hand. I’m looking at him, I’m about a head taller, I’ve got 100 pounds on him easy, and I’m watching him gracefully control pretty much the whole room and I’m thinking “Jesus, this guy could break me in half.”
I wouldn’t step into the ring with his wife either - “He's a gifted man, but, in the end, he's just a man.”

“An anti-gun collectivist elected as president. Someone who thinks government is there to provide things for people rather than to preserve freedom and liberty.”

As a (many) gun owner here’s the thing - the Supreme Court made a landmark ruling on this.
Congress isn’t going to be passing too many laws, not only because of the ruling, but the whole economic thing is going to be a huge pain in the keister, so firearms restriction, pretty low down on the list there.

And from the executive branch?
Worst we can expect is that he actually enforces the gun laws that are on the books now. Which is how the system is supposed to work.
Part of the right to own a firearm would include maybe being able to afford one. Maybe being educated on how to use one.
That takes social support, like it or not.
I hate to harp on this quote, but it’s damn true - good generals study tactics, great generals study logistics.
Your men gotta eat, no matter how much firepower you’re lugging around.

“Today, it feels like the future.”
Yeah. Finally feels like the new century.
And it’s nice to have a president that I’m not absolutely positive that I’m smarter than.

“THAT NEVER HAPPENS.”

Nah. It always happens: "First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win."
It just takes someone to remind folks. So few people do, it does indeed appear to never happen.
posted by Smedleyman at 11:53 PM on November 4, 2008 [8 favorites]


Great work, all of you who were on the ground and on the phones for Obama. Thank you.
posted by Kraftmatic Adjustable Cheese at 11:57 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


This thread was the first thing I checked today. Great fucking job, USA. I dare say it's probably the best political event for mankind since the Berlin wall came down in 1989.
If you did it, then there's a speckle of hope for everyone of us, out here, because that's what we've been hanging on to for some time now..

(also: welcome to socialism social democracy, it's not so bad, you'll see)
posted by _dario at 11:57 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm still in shock a little, and I feel like I need to celebrate somehow (I'd drink, but I don't drink)

This is just amazing. Amazing.

Awesome (an overused word, that has lost it's true meaning) I am filled with awe. For realz, yo.
posted by exlotuseater at 11:57 PM on November 4, 2008


Grapefruitfuzz,

I think it's because we are a young country, an idealistic country. We began as an idea of self-government, limited government and claim that life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are not merely to be desired, but that the right to them is intrinsic in each of us.
Unlike other nations we weren't an ethnicity, a language group or a product of mere geography. All we had was this democratic experiment.

Have we been perfect? No, but the arc of our history bends toward justice. Our own ideals accuse us, goad us, inspire us. Abolitionists, Suffragettes, Civil Rights advocates were able to invoke the best aspects of our national myth and national identity. They held us to the ideals we already claimed to believe and slowly we moved forward.

Our history is mottled with bad choices. Our government has done bad things, but We the People have always made progress, not just economically or militarily but morally. Slowly, and by fits and starts we perfect the vision we have of ourselves and our commitments to freedom, equality, and success through work and ingenuity.

I am proud of my country tonight, because I think of Martin Luther King. I think of hoses and dogs in Birmingham. I think of Suffragettes demanding the vote and abolitionists publishing impassioned newspapers. And I am witnessing the product of their effort, Obama's victory is the concrescence of our living history, an outgrowth of our initial ideals. I am proud to witness it, and this evening very proud to call myself an American.
posted by MasonDixon at 11:58 PM on November 4, 2008 [11 favorites]


Thank God McCain didn't win, I hope you're as good as your word Obama, congrats America.
posted by pencil at 12:00 AM on November 5, 2008


In honor of this day, I offer this quote from one of MetaFilter's most famous trolls, who now owes 52% of America and 98% of MetaFilter an apology:

Why do all these Obama supporters remind me of Dukakis supporters, and Kerry supporters, and Gore supporters (before Gore found himself)?

I guess it's probably because they're mostly under 40, or have never voted in a general election, or fail to understand the machinations of politics, or completely ignore the fact that Obama's underlying advisory group is more right than Clinton, or that there is something called the "GOP Attack Machine" that will take everything Obama has done and said that's even remotely questionable, and use it as compost to grow a garden of middle-American doubt that will end up having McCain as President.

If I'm wrong, and I *love* to be shown I'm wrong, unlike many dreamers who persist in their vision, even as they're plunging over the precipice, I will buy all the delusional Obamatans on the thread a virtual lunch, by coming back to say that I was wrong, and you were right.

Until then, Hillary - a person who wrote the best book on family values ever penned by a politician (It Takes a Village); who was willing to stick her neck out for universal health insurance, in defiance of even the top players in her own party; who redefined the role of First Lady as activist; who has a solid record of liberal accomplishment over years; who is one of the smartest policy wonks out there; who has survived the savaging of the GOP and her own misguided party (from the Camelot far left); and, who has survived in spite of the annointed blessing of a press who has practically elevated Obama to the level of saint....HIllary will stay in this and fight like hell, because she knows how to do that, and she will WIN! GO HILLARY!!!!!!

posted by MetaMan at 8:48 AM on March 19

posted by lostburner at 12:03 AM on November 5, 2008 [8 favorites]


I dare say it's probably the best political event for mankind since the Berlin wall came down in 1989.

Oh, surely you jest. After all, Canada elected Stephen Harper. Nothing can compare to that!
posted by five fresh fish at 12:07 AM on November 5, 2008


Who knew that Bob the builder had more foresight than Joe the Plumber?
Can we fix it? Yes we can!
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=3IWKhYQarJU
posted by b33j at 12:09 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Yes we could! I am so proud of America! My faith in our democracy is seriously restored.
posted by aliceinreality at 12:09 AM on November 5, 2008


Damn. It looks like Prop 8 is passing in California. My deepest sympathy to queer Californians.

Fuck Mormons.
posted by rodgerd at 12:09 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Obama will be the first African American president. Am I wrong to want him to be known, after his term(s), as THE BEST PRESIDENT EVER!?!

If you're declaring him the "best president ever" simply based on the color of his skin, then yes, I'd say you're wrong. The man hasn't served one single day in office yet; why don't we wait until the end of his first term before making such sweeping generalizations? (Just curious, do you consider him to be the "best senator Illinois ever had"?)
posted by Oriole Adams at 12:10 AM on November 5, 2008


Fuck Mormons.

Seconded.
posted by lostburner at 12:11 AM on November 5, 2008


Oh thank God. I can finally exhale.
posted by From Bklyn at 12:12 AM on November 5, 2008


The Constitution is going to make a comeback.
posted by inconsequentialist at 12:12 AM on November 5, 2008


Obama will be the first African American president. Am I wrong to want him to be known, after his term(s), as THE BEST PRESIDENT EVER!?!

If you're declaring him the "best president ever" simply based on the color of his skin, then yes, I'd say you're wrong. The man hasn't served one single day in office yet; why don't we wait until the end of his first term before making such sweeping generalizations? (Just curious, do you consider him to be the "best senator Illinois ever had"?)


I think that's meant to be taken as "Hopefully he will act in such a way so as to make him the best president ever". Otherwise I agree with you, but my reading feels better.
posted by Lemurrhea at 12:15 AM on November 5, 2008


Good work, Barry: now don't fuck it up.
posted by jtron at 12:15 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


This is one fifth of November that I will remember, remember.

Proud to be a Hoosier.
Proud to be an American.
Grateful for all the hard work by millions.
Hopeful for the first time in decades.

It's been a blast to check in with you all. Sleep well...we've got a lot of work to do.
posted by CitizenD at 12:17 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh man, reading Free Republic has never been so much fun.
posted by Kraftmatic Adjustable Cheese at 12:18 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Dancing on the streets of D. C.

I cut a little jig myself here in Rhode Island... and drank a shot of black death when Jon Stewart announced that the election had been called for Obama.
posted by Kattullus at 12:19 AM on November 5, 2008


I liked the United States of America before it was cool to like the United States of America.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 12:20 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Indeed; Obama taught Constitutional law. I doubt his interpretation will match anyone else's completely, but it's gotta be better than the last eight years.
posted by Malor at 12:22 AM on November 5, 2008


DirtyCreature, I'm trying to figure out what the fuck you actually want.
posted by maxwelton


Not to speak for DirtyCreature, but isn't it quite apparent? I'm as excited for change as the next person, but this thread is kind of like celebrating a meal that hasn't been made. Step one is done. Step 2-999 are not. This was the easy part. Nothing else has changed. Yet.
posted by Dennis Murphy at 12:22 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


About 6000 miles from America's nearest shore, this American is jumping up and down on his Tokyo tatami floor in sheer joy. I am elated. Fantastic, just fantastic!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:23 AM on November 5, 2008


As a cultural moderate, I feel good in some ways about President-elect Obama's win. He's bright and he's inspirational, and with a keen sense of historical perspective. But as a national security hawk, I pray that he and his people will have the balls and the know-how to respond effectively, honestly (unlike Bush) and intelligently when the terrorists start up more shit. And I suspect they will -- ask Biden.
posted by Seekerofsplendor at 12:24 AM on November 5, 2008


Heckuva job, Hopey!
posted by kirkaracha at 12:25 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


And he's getting a new puppy for his daughters to play with in the White House! The wife and I laughed delightedly when he said that in his speech.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:26 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Dear Rest of the World,

We're better than you think. Give us another chance?

Love,

America


(Crying all morning.)
posted by triggerfinger at 12:28 AM on November 5, 2008


I am so effing happy. I love you all!
posted by cytherea at 12:28 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Coming from Florida, being blue never felt so good.
posted by inconsequentialist at 12:30 AM on November 5, 2008


Out of the last 43 hours I've slept for about 4 of them. I'm all cried out. It's 3:30AM here in Florida and we pulled it off. We weren't even the deciding vote and I feel optimistic again. I hope this is the dawn of a great era in America and for the rest of the world. Before the election, I said we're on the precipice of a fragile first step in the right direction. We took that big step and now, I hope, we're on a better path to a future we can be proud of.

Congratulations, everyone!
posted by empyrean at 12:36 AM on November 5, 2008


"Oh man, reading Free Republic has never been so much fun."

It's truly bizarre. Their server is a bit borked right now, but if you get through to the threads it leads to the most amazing mix of self-pity, contempt, and illogic ever. They literally don't understand that they hold niche views, if not downright crackpot conspiracy theories.

What's even better is if you can catch a thread that's about to be deleted. Truly bizarro-world stuff like "Our votes didn't work, but our bullets will, WHO'S WITH ME AMIRITE???" and so on.

Who are these people? I don't know, but I do know Barack Hussein Obama is their president for the next four years at least.
posted by bardic at 12:37 AM on November 5, 2008


Congratulations USA! As a non-American, I feel like giving you all a big hug! I know I breathed a sigh of relief tonight. I can only imagine how everyone who voted for Obama must feel.

I'm as excited for change as the next person, but this thread is kind of like celebrating a meal that hasn't been made. Step one is done. Step 2-999 are not. This was the easy part. Nothing else has changed. Yet.

Actually, I see it more as being really excited because someone finally took away that shit sandwich that's been sitting on your plate for the last eight years and replaced it with actual food. You may not have tasted it yet, but you know it's going to be a huge improvement.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 12:39 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Sleep well, America. You've earned it.

Tomorrow we have to start catching up on what Bush + Cheney have been doing for the last few weeks while we've been busy winning the election.
posted by benzenedream at 12:40 AM on November 5, 2008


Unlike other nations we weren't an ethnicity, a language group or a product of mere geography. All we had was this democratic experiment.

There is truth in this. What has struck me watching the coverage (and comparing and contrasting it to the parliamentary-style elections I am used to) is the novelty of having your country stand for something in the minds of its citizens. This doesn't really happen in, for example, my country New Zealand, where the elections are all about what the parties stand for, and there is little or less focus on the national project itself. Indeed, I'd say that in many ways there isn't a national project in countries like NZ or Australia. (Actually last night during the election I asked my Australian girlfriend what Australia stood for, and after a long pause she said "Uhhh, she'll be right?")

So through watching this election, I learned something about the US: the fact that foriegners find mindless reflexive rah rah USA stuff distasteful or bizarre (and yeah, we do) is not because we're somehow superior because we're less nationalistic; it's because we're mistaking the style for the substance of it--we forget that that there a set of ideas associated with America itself in the minds of its citizens, because we have no ideas and ideals associated with our own (although in practice tend to have exactly the same freedoms and liberties as the US). I'd say this is why the patriotic stuff plays so badly overseas - sure sometimes it can descend into meaningless sloganeering, but it's being misunderstood as substanceless when in fact it actually means something.

This is why plenty of countries would never tear up at the election of a government -- their aims are a little lower. (This BTW is generally seen as a good thing. The Middle East could do with a little 'She'll be right' but we're not hellbend on conversion.)

Anyway, those were my thoughts the election.
posted by dydecker at 12:40 AM on November 5, 2008 [32 favorites]


At Seattle pike and broadway street party still going on. Gurillea fireworks and cheap champagne all over the place over 2 sq blocks, better be walking here , roads blocked and buses rerouted

Yeah, I drove up there, parked blocks away, then walked into the thick of things. I think I did it wrong because;

I still kind of have the flu, and didn't feel like screaming.

I was sober.

I carried neither cell phone nor camera.

I was alone.

I became distracted examining two stainless steel sculptures.

Everyone was 20 years younger than I was.

But I'm glad I participated.

I think the only other political rally I've ever attended was one held on the University of Montana campus, in 1972 by George McGovern's running mate Sargent Shriver. This was just before Halloween, and he claimed Nixon would give the "tricks to you and the treats to Thiệu".
posted by Tube at 12:41 AM on November 5, 2008


So much hope. Kinda sad.
posted by zouhair at 12:43 AM on November 5, 2008


"It's been a long time coming, but tonight, because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to America." -- President-Elect Barack Obama
posted by scody at 12:43 AM on November 5, 2008


AP's California exit poll highlights:

BLACKS BACK BAN. Blacks turning out in droves to support Obama also threw their support strongly behind Proposition 8, which would overturn the state Supreme Court decision allowing gay marriage.
posted by randomstriker at 12:45 AM on November 5, 2008


So much hope. Kinda sad.

Hope is never sad. Dashed hope can be sad. But not hope.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 1:01 AM on November 5, 2008


So much hope. Kinda sad.

What?

Yeah, there are problems in the world, serious problems. But they are not going to get any better if we don't try. What tonight was about was that we actually can try. Yes we can. And maybe it's too late, I don't know. Maybe we are fucked. I don't know. But we can at least try. And we can't win if we don't try.

And I, for one, now have some hope. Hope is so much better than despair and nothing. We are free from our long nightmare of war and counter prosperity. We are free to imagine a better future, and maybe we can just pull it off. Sure, we may loose, but there really is good in the world, Virginia. Everything depends on a red wheelbarrow filled with hope.
posted by cytherea at 1:03 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


In my personal politics, I'm very libertarian on social issues, so I know Obama will probably piss me off more than a few times in the coming years.

But I'm still thrilled that he won. We now have a president who said "The Wire" is his favorite show and, for some insane reason, this gives me great hope for the future. Absurd really, the things we pin our hopes on.

Just dear god/cthulhu/fsm, please don't let Obama turn into a Carcetti.
posted by pandaharma at 1:04 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]




Fuck Mormons.

You could, but first you have to marry all of them.
posted by bwg at 1:08 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Fuck Mormons.

Fuck this kind of talk. The Mormon Church was behind this travesty, yes -- but not every Mormon supported it. There are gay and straight Mormons who opposed Prop 8, and opposed their church's assault on GLBT civil rights -- I know some of them personally. Obama's victory should tell us many things, not the least of which is that we shouldn't paint all members of any single group with one broad brush.
posted by scody at 1:17 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


Re: Ron Paul

Ron Paul was only on one state's ballot and not by his own initiative (he was drafted by the Montana branch of the Constitution Party), and the 13k or so votes wasn't a terrible showing for a minor party in a small state.

You can thank him for one thing: almost delivering Montana to the Democrats. It's a pity Paul didn't grab the Libertarian nomination, as this probably would have flipped one or two more red states into the blue column.

The money bombs were for the primaries, which delivered him around a million votes. A better performance than the lovely and fetching Alan Keyes.

Paul and Obama supporters actually had a great deal in common, outside of the obvious ideological differences. They both wanted a great change in Washington and a clean break from the current incompetent and criminal regime.
posted by pandaharma at 1:17 AM on November 5, 2008


Fuck this, there should be a California Amendment keeping the Mormons from getting tax-exempt status. Let's tax them as a corporation and retroactively collect back taxes.
posted by amuseDetachment at 1:18 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


I went to meet a friend at a pub in uptown, south Minneapolis, and on the way there I texted another friend asking how Obama was doing in the races. Just then, in the cab, the dispatcher announced "Obama is president". I pretty much freaked out, punched(lightly) the cabby, Bern, in his right shoulder, saying "fuck yeah!", then quickly apologized for swearing. I didn't believe, it being just after 10:00, that he was actually announced president. Bern said it was no big deal that I swore. Neat guy. When I arrived at the bar, everyone, I mean everyone, was silent, listening to John McCain's speech on Obama's win. Really, it was like you could hear a beer coaster drop on the floor. Then when Obama finally came onstage in Chicago, the whole bar cheered! It was amazing. I'll never, ever forget this night. Thank you, Obama.
posted by babybuns at 1:18 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Sure the news is great, but be sure that President Obama and the Democratic Congress will be blamed for the price of all the measures that must be taken to restore the country. Besides the taxes which we will have to pay to undo 8 years of mismanagement, my next worry is what Gov. Palin will do with the $150k wardrobe? Put it in mothballs for 2012 or 2016? I fear we have not heard the last of that ambitious woman.
posted by Cranberry at 1:18 AM on November 5, 2008


Speak for yourself, Dydecker - I sobbed in joy at the last Australian election.
posted by Lucie at 1:19 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Congratulations, President-Elect Obama, the sixty million people who turned out to vote for him, the three million people who donated and the hundreds of thousands who worked and volunteered to make this day possible. And congratulations, America.
posted by so_necessary at 1:20 AM on November 5, 2008


I promised myself I wouldn't cry. I'm crying. I don't look that great when I'm crying, but now I don't care.
posted by trip and a half at 1:24 AM on November 5, 2008


*gives thumbs up*

Good one, yanks! You did the right thing.
posted by dg at 1:26 AM on November 5, 2008


Barack in the House - Meatbomb (2008)

The tired old white man's going home with Barack in the House.
He scared my children on the phone and Barack's in the House.
He said we'd fight a million wars but Barack's in the House.
That guy can't scare me anymore cuz Barack's in the House.

My kids can see the doctor now cuz Barack's in the House.
We're gonna make things right somehow with Barack in the House.
I wonder why I'm feeling good. Cuz Barack's in the House?
They said we can't but I guess we could and now Barack's in the House.

Feel OK about payin' tax,
Finally get the haters off my back,
The world will like us once again,
And as if all that shit wasn't enough:

The tired old white man's going home with Barack in the House.
He scared my children on the phone and Barack's in the House.
Now everything will be unfucked with Barack's in the House?
With love and hope and peace and luck! Yo! Barack's in the House.

Ya know, I never felt so good with Barack in the House.
I hope the tired old white man
has a good long rest....
with Barack in the House.
posted by Meatbomb at 1:27 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


HIllary will stay in this and fight like hell, because she knows how to do that, and she will WIN! GO HILLARY!!!!!!

posted by MetaMan at 8:48 AM on March 19


Fuck it. MetaMan doesn't owe anyone shit. (S?)he backed his choice hard, uncompromisingly. All you have to do is look at the subsequent McCain campaign to realize she ran a tough, fair campaign. Barack beat her on the ground with the same pragmatic yet hopeful campaign that he took to the nation and won, won, won. I bet MetaMan voted for Obama, in the final analysis. Reinstate Metaman without prejudice! I miss MetaMan! Come back and tell us what you think.
posted by nanojath at 1:35 AM on November 5, 2008


Sometimes I feel bad because I live in a little bubble of Portland, where lots of people seem hip and lots of people buy books and lots of people seem to be pretty progressive and vocal about lots of progressive things, and maybe I don't see all the other types of folks in their daily lives, and thus can't empathize with their ideas, and I'm really missing out, and I need to move somewhere where not as many people agree with me.

But tonight I could hear whistling fireworks from the back of the bookstore, and when I stepped outside, there were huge crowds of people shouting joyfully as as they lined the streets, and car horns were honking as they drove through the intersection, and there was a bagpiping unicyclist pedaling back and forth. People were marching with pots and pans, everyone was waving and high-fiving and chanting "Yes We Can", and it was absolutely terrific.
posted by redsparkler at 1:38 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thank you, America.

Just watched an interview with the ambassador in London. Oh boy did he have a sour face... come on over Oprah!
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 1:39 AM on November 5, 2008


Une émotion incroyable. Thanks for this.
posted by nicolin at 1:45 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


So, I'm hanging out at the Comet Tavern here in Seattle and it is fucking PACKED. New Years Eve packed ($1 beers help!) and all the sudden we hear drumming out on the street. Some dude (who had earlier DEMANDED I lift him on my shoulders) went to his apartment and grabbed a drum. All of the sudden a few hundred people are on Pine and 12th. We decide to start walking.

We walk and walk and walk until we get down to the Showbox near Pike Place Market. I turn around and there are THOUSANDS of people behind us (all having walked a mile or so in the cold, windy night)!

The cops were exceedingly cool and didn't attempt to break it up, they shut down East/West traffic and just watched.

The most amazing thing was watching dozens of people RUN out of a bus stuck in the parade traffic to join it.

Easily the most diverse crowd of people I've ever seen. I ended up smoking with two HUGE black trannys who thanked me for voting for Obama. That's when I knew things had REALLY changed.

The whole night was just so goddamn amazing I cannot put it into words.
posted by lattiboy at 1:47 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


If the McCain that conceded had been the McCain that campaigned for the last two months this could have gone very differently. I'm stunned that the commentators are now praising the choice of Palin as one that mobilised the Republican base: yes, at the expense of a middle ground many times the size. Forget the Obama Santos comparisons. The McCain campaign went Vinick.

"Attention world: We're back baby!"

I'm as happy as the next guy about the result, but that's very far from being true.

And don't call us baby.
posted by nthdegx at 1:53 AM on November 5, 2008


Big congratulations from yet another happy, scratch that, stoked furriner!!!
posted by Onanist at 1:53 AM on November 5, 2008


I feel so... ELATED. And tired. And sleepy. It was great seeing the London folk on ustream at 4 AM. Please don't fight mefites. Not today. Today is a day for tears and kisses. Hugs and beers. No punches.

It is my sincere wish that all the angry McCainiacs and bitter single-issue voters take the fucking day off for once and just revel in the history being made around you. Obama isn't going to eat your children. He might just help us all to regain some semblance of dignity.

From today on, I will no longer be embarrassed to admit where I'm from.
posted by chuckdarwin at 1:54 AM on November 5, 2008


No the stupidity of Palin wasn't that they appealed to the base. The base is their GOTV operation and their core volunteers. If they don't have their base, they're fucked. He should've picked Huckabee. He fires up the base, and is potentially lovable to the center.

It was some bullshit idea of getting Hillary voters that probably got Palin (who knows, we'll see when inside stories start coming out), that was idiotic.
posted by amuseDetachment at 1:58 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


\o/ Congratulations America.
posted by jiroczech at 2:15 AM on November 5, 2008


I'm from an old European country. I've always been shown that only racists are patriotic, and all feelings of national pride must be instantly accompanied by a recitation of all the war crimes ever committed by people from my country, the prejudices still to come and the venal worthlessness of the current regime. As a liberal, I believe this intrinsically. How do Americans stay so self-adoring? (I'm not being snide, but I really want to know. Where's the self-loathing?)

I know it's sort of rhetorical, but I'll answer, and then, by God, off to bed (finally): my self-loathing started in the eight grade (age 15 or so): call it 1986-1987. I'd adopted the academically questionable but pragmatically expedient habit of choosing term paper projects that just "happened" to be heavy in the mainstream media: it made research simple. My family got Newsweek in the mail. I picked Apartheid as a topic for a required term paper. In these pre-internet days, the encyclopedia (note for progeny: a primitive print-only form of N-pedia) was a gimme, knock out a reference requirement resource to plumb at the school library. Dawdling as usual, I grabbed an encyclopedia and took notes on the topic. Then I realized - all the current editions of the encyclopedia were already out: I'd gotten an edition that was something like 20 years out of date. Well, shit, 15 year old me thought. This apartheid crap has been going on for decades. How come Newsweek is all over it now?! And I realized, the narrative of democracy I'd been handed thus far was crock. Maybe a well meaning crock, but there it was. Decades, and I'd just found out about it, because it happened to be getting hot at that moment.

I never took the "news" for granted again. I never felt quite so simply positive about America again.

We are not self-adoring. At our best, we hope for a promise that the unrealized brilliance of our founders expressed so eloquently but realized only a small part of. This election, I felt like I did a little part to push that timeless agenda forward. Let us bask for a minute. There is plenty of work ahead. But we are not dull and inured to history. We are not without a strategy, to go forward, consolidating this little gain.
posted by nanojath at 2:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Ever since Bush won the previous election, I've felt that I, as a citizen of the world, should get a vote in the US election. Thank you for not making me feel that level of frustration again.
posted by neblina_matinal at 2:23 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Well done, America. This is the first step towards regaining the respect you once had in the world.
posted by sveskemus at 2:26 AM on November 5, 2008


Congratulations America.

We knew you could do it.

*Pats America on the head*

See what happens when you set your mind to something, study hard, and don’t get distracted by silly games? Let’s put this up on the fridge where everyone can see it.

We’re all so proud of you.

But .... "AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!" ?? .... Now, now... don't you see that's the kind of thinking that got you into this mess in the first place?

Besides, wasn't it Canadians who said that? That's irony, not partiotism.

Have some fun tonight, but tomorrow, it's back to the study!

You'll get there - I'm sure. Your friends are here to support you :)
posted by Diag at 2:27 AM on November 5, 2008 [13 favorites]


And don't call us baby.

And nobody puts baby in a corner!
posted by mnsc at 2:29 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Tonight is bittersweet for this liberal Los Angeles Californian.

Obama winning gives me a lot of hope. I don't agree with all of his platforms, and I don't believe he can make the fundamental change it's hard not to hope for, but I think he will do as well as anyone could.

But proposition 8 passing reminds me how far we have to go, and I hope the passion this election has evoked doesn't fade as quickly as I fear it will.
posted by flaterik at 2:30 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


tkchrist, I just wanted to point out that you were wrong, morons do no decide elections in America.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 2:36 AM on November 5, 2008


Hang on, I thought Matt said "just bear with us for one day" in the top-bar, and here you are *still* talking about the election a day later! And in *another* thread, to boot!

That's almost a bootable offence!
posted by UbuRoivas at 2:37 AM on November 5, 2008


It's just past midnight on O'ahu. I have done my laughing, shouting, crying ... joined others shrieking and applauding (celebrating Obama and a community win as well) ... then returned home and read every line in this long thread.

Obama ... he is pono, he is a light. Mahalo, mahalo, mahalo to all of you -- most especially to the young people who turned this election around!

"Aloha kekahi i kekahi." --- Love one another.


Yes, this is a chicken skin day for us here.
posted by Surfurrus at 2:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Yes, Obama for president!!!

What, did I miss anything?
posted by Laotic at 2:44 AM on November 5, 2008


Fuck Mormons.

No kidding. Like they, of all people, should be lecturing the rest of us about traditional marriage.
posted by ValkoSipuliSuola at 2:47 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


You know, I am excited about Obama and all, but soon there's going to be all these letters going out to married couples in California telling them they're not married anymore.

I know that battles for civil rights are sometimes a long, ugly slog, but it is tragic that on the eve of such a major symbolic victory for one group's civil rights, another group's is thrown under the proverbial bus.

Indeed, the various homophobic amendments that passed in Florida and California couldn't have passed if some of the same people who voted for Obama had not voted for those amendments as well.

This is worth remembering as President Obama begins his term. Yes, this is a victory for Progressives, but some of the folks who gave him their vote are maybe kinda backwards and would maybe kinda turn on him if he tried to pursue civil rights for homosexuals.
posted by Joey Michaels at 2:47 AM on November 5, 2008 [8 favorites]


booting aside, here's an anecdote that people might like:

i had the good fortune to see Patti Smith at the Sydney Opera House a week or two ago. Part-way through the performance, she said that she had been ill, and a doctor had been called to her hotel room.

when she tried to pay him for the visit, he replied "No thanks. Please keep my fee, take it back to America & donate it to Obama's campaign"

the audience erupted.

then she launched into People Have the Power.
posted by UbuRoivas at 2:49 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hey guys, did I miss anything?
posted by zippy at 2:50 AM on November 5, 2008


Just found Mc Cain's address to the disappointed republican voters : pretty neat and sensible, isn't it ? Hopefully there's going to be some change among the people who are in charge too.
posted by nicolin at 2:58 AM on November 5, 2008


Yes!!!!!
posted by raztaj at 2:58 AM on November 5, 2008


*Pats America on the head*

Patronizing, much? We're not a wayward child. There may be a wayward child still in office, but that doesn't mean the rest of the country is similarly confused - if not anguished for the last 8 years.

But .... "AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!" ??

Are you not aware of the sardonic re-appropriation that's in play here or are you merely blinded by your own smug patronization? You're talking about the country that invented lasers, the integrated circuit, the microprocessor and the internet.

For all the bad choices we've made over the last 8 (and many more) years, we've been quite generous with our toys, our knowledge and hard work. We could debate (and agree upon) the evils of economic colonialism and the meddling of affairs all night long - but I'm less and less tolerant of such rhetoric while much of the world freely reaps the technological and scientific benefits in the same breath.

For right now, for tonight - for all the trials and work we still face - for all the frustration and idiocy of the last eight years - AMERICA, FUCK YEAH is a pretty appropriate short term response to our first not-another-fucking-rich-old-white-guy President.

No, here, take back your offensive little pat on the head. We don't want it. We're just trying to do what is right, and that is its own reward. (Seriously, since when has the USA actually cared about global opinion? We're doing this for all of us.)

Anyway. With any luck and hard work you'll need both hands free just in case we really get our shit back together. No, maybe not for applause. Maybe because you're running for your life under another 100 year crapflood of Disney movies and McDonald's hamburgers.

Or maybe because you're running to keep up with us in the not so far off future.

Never underestimate the United States of America. Excessively proud, full of greed and avarice, fat, lazy - yes, all of those and more - but also extremely, dangerously creative and adaptable, and entirely capable of change on a massive scale.

Watch us now. Get to work, America. Yes, we can. Oh yes, we can.
posted by loquacious at 3:01 AM on November 5, 2008 [22 favorites]


What?
posted by nthdegx at 3:09 AM on November 5, 2008



But .... "AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!" ??

Are you not aware of the sardonic re-appropriation that's in play here or are you merely blinded by your own smug patronization?


The sardonic re-appropriation may run deeper than you think.

Then again, it may not.
posted by ghost of a past number at 3:14 AM on November 5, 2008


The Commonwealth of Australia wishes to congratulate our seppo friends on electing a TRUE BLUE BONZA BLOKE!

Party on.
posted by Jimbob at 3:15 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Seriously, since when has the USA actually cared about global opinion? We're doing this for all of us

Could've saved yourself a lot of typing there.

Oh, right.
posted by pompomtom at 3:19 AM on November 5, 2008


loquacious said : exactly what I wanted to hear.

Yes mate, that's it. It wasn't meant as patronising, although I knew it would come across that way. But I was teasing.

I am from Australia. I think pretty much the same about our own situation here as I do about yours. We are all in the same boat. I said the same thing to my own countrymen when we changed from conservative to (small L) liberal government earlier this year.

My point was - I am very happy for you all, and all of us, but this is only the start. We all have a long way to go.

I'm with you buddy, and, as it would now seem, happily, most of your countrymen.

And I understand the "America Fuck yeah" thing is just an appropriate-at-the-time outburst of excitement and pride, and I support that. But, still... I don't want to see any of us falling into the same nationalistic traps we have in the past.
posted by Diag at 3:24 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


I'm not American a lot of my relatives are my dad's aunts and uncles immigrated more than 50 years ago built businesses careers and prospered old wrinkly and strange and foreign I thought they had children grandchildren and great-grandchildren at home my mum and her family were persecuted by the Nazis during the war but we were liberated by Americans Brits and Canadians alphabetical order just in time for them to survive my dad's mum got her teeth knocked out in a concentration camp for harbouring American pilots who had been shot down for some reason my image of the typical American had always been a black man but when I first visted the US well California really met Mickey Mouse and Snow White at the age of six I was somewhat surprised and then after Bill and Monica I was disappointed not with him because of her though but with your country No I thought No and then the elections I was devastated how can this happen is this for real because of all your power and then four years later GITMO torture blackops Blackwater Halliburton KUBARK I was crushed even more WTF America how can this be what happened to your sense of justice and equality your promise and imagination your responsibility because you are so powerful and influential and now another four years later I continue to take issue with your unconditional support of Israel the CIA and other ways your government deems it necessary to protect its interests whatever they are in countries Iraq Iran whole continents Latin America Africa AskMe questions about whether or not to go to the emergency room because they're not sure they can afford it but today you said you want change yes there's hope yes your promise yes and your people yes and yes we can has he said and yes you said yes we want change yes we can you said and yes you did Yes.

Thank you.
posted by ponystyle at 3:25 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


Just watched an interview with the ambassador in London. Oh boy did he have a sour face... come on over Oprah!

That's because he just lost his plum job.

Unlike the civil service in the UK & Australia (and, presumably, NZ, Canada, and other Commonwealth countries) where diplomats are typically career public servants, all American ambassadors are political appointees.

They're appointed by the President, and they leave with the President.
posted by UbuRoivas at 3:25 AM on November 5, 2008


O!








I'm watching the sun come up, in more ways than one. Looks good. Feels good, too.



posted by Kirth Gerson at 3:27 AM on November 5, 2008


And I also meant to add that my earlier post wasn't mean to be from an Australian's perspective. It was more meant from some hypothetical ubiquitous all-seeing global enitity's perspective. If you know what I mean. But I'm an atheist, so... whatever. heh
posted by Diag at 3:28 AM on November 5, 2008


wait, Obama's blue?
posted by UbuRoivas at 3:29 AM on November 5, 2008


It's morning and it's still true!!!!! HOLY AWESOME!!!!!

I am totally, totally exhausted and I realize that part of what I feel right now, other than pride and joy, is RELIEF. Man, this election cycle was rough on the soul, but I could start crying all over again. As one of the fathers in my Schmoop's music class said: he's what the world needs now.

My first election I participated in was 2000, where I became totally disenfranchised with "the system." Now I see that we CAN and we WILL totally ROCK THE SYSTEM. Power to the people! For the first time in my adult life I *get* what it means to be an American, and it's an awesome, awesome thing. I could hug us. Every last one of us.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 3:32 AM on November 5, 2008


This is a huge day for my family, especially for my parents. We had the privilege to be run out of two towns simply because my parents had black friends and saw no reason to exclude them from any aspects of our lives and community. Probably not the smartest thing to do for two idealistic young, white adults with 5 children dependent on a music teacher's salary supplemented by work as a youth minister at the local methodist church in the mid-60's in east texas.

I finally had the chance to see some of the video footage from the day an hour or so ago and I began to tear up. Seeing images of black families that were full of, hope. Hope and knowledge! The vision and knowledge in their eyes that that nothing is out of reach anymore and that this is their country and their children don't need to know limitations beyond those of any other citizen of the USA.

That is change.

I hope Obama has the strength and insight needed to lead the USA through its immediate crisis and begin to correct the disasters of the last 8 years, but he has already succeeded in changing the country.
posted by michswiss at 3:33 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[deep breath]

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

there really are no words, are there?
posted by pxe2000 at 3:39 AM on November 5, 2008


"I can see change from my house!"
posted by thrakintosh at 3:46 AM on November 5, 2008 [25 favorites]


Greetings from Europe where a sense of relief is palpable!
posted by tomcosgrave at 3:46 AM on November 5, 2008


I was in my classroom in the afternoon eating school lunch (I work in a Japanese Elementary School near Tokyo), when the homeroom teacher turned on the news to see the results. He saw the results and immediately started going crazy with joy. He made the class break out into an "Obama!" chant. Granted they were 3rd graders and didn't quite grasp why they all liked Obama, I'm not quite sure either, but regardless it was a moving experience. Afterwords he took me aside and said the US really is a democracy, you've just elected a black president.

It's strange to see people so worked up over a foreign country's election. My Japanese friends have been endless emailing me with congratulations all day. I guess we can finally start to clean our tarnished image.
posted by vodkadin at 3:49 AM on November 5, 2008


The sardonic re-appropriation may run deeper than you think.

No, I was talking about re-appropriating it from the movie as a sort of tongue-in-cheek acknowledgment-turned-detournement of the fact that we suck - but tonight perhaps not so much. What is that, meta-sardony? You know what? I don't even know any more, and I don't know if I care. It's a stupid movie populated with low hanging fruit, and sarcasm folds in on itself like a linguistic singularity and we're all left looking excessively cool and stupid in its wan glow. Get off of my lawn.

What?

I know I live in a fantasy world full of strange, terrifying visions. But as close to anything in my life it's my job, and it's often fruitless and thankless.

But I can see a slim glimmer of a future USA that's just as proud - if not prouder - of its solar power scientists and engineers as it is of petrogeologists and oil derrick workers. I can see massive investments in both new alternative energy infrastructure and maintaining and reinvesting in our decaying infrastructure.

I can even see a future USA that is more careful in considering its role in the world with all due meaning of what the words "consider" and "consideration" actually mean.

And that's a really big thing for this country. I can't even really begin to describe how big it is for us. I don't even know what it means. I've never known anything like it in all of my life. Because peace begins at home. Peace begins in our homes, our schools, on the streets around here. And if we're going to have anything resembling peace we need - as a nation - to learn to play better with others. To share and think globally and locally.


Of course, I could just as easily see it all being the same old happy horseshit going straight to hell in a flaming fucking hand basket. But that's easy. I already know what that's like.

But hope? That's different. I'm still not even sure I know what hope really is.
posted by loquacious at 3:52 AM on November 5, 2008 [8 favorites]


Funny this is, now that I can sleep at night, I couldn't sleep last night!
posted by gman at 3:55 AM on November 5, 2008


It's pretty fucking excellent, yeah.
posted by The Straightener at 3:55 AM on November 5, 2008


It's strange to see people so worked up over a foreign country's election.

It's because we all expect so much from you. I mean, you're always going on about how you're the greatest country on earth, it's just great to see some evidence now and again.

Seriously, I think you've elected a good guy. There was a post here on Metafilter a few weeks back, about a photographer who had been following Obama around on the campaign trail. There was a photo of Obama talking on the phone, with his feet on a table, and you could see holes worn in his shoes. The photographer commented on this to him, and Obama told him he's already had his shoes re-soled twice.

This man gets his shoes re-soled.

Sarah Palin spent more than about what 95% of Americans earn in a year on fancy dresses since she became the VP nominee, but Obama doesn't even buy a new pair of shoes when he needs them.

Enough said. You need this guy.
posted by Jimbob at 3:58 AM on November 5, 2008 [21 favorites]


Yes mate, that's it. It wasn't meant as patronising, although I knew it would come across that way. But I was teasing.

Cheers, mate. Sorry, I'm a little punchy. What's with all the corks on your hat?
posted by loquacious at 3:58 AM on November 5, 2008


>there really are no words, are there?

I think you'll find there are thousands upon thousands.
posted by pompomtom at 3:59 AM on November 5, 2008


Ya know something else. I can laugh at images of GWB now without dread of the havoc he and his henchmen, nay controllers might cause in the world.
posted by michswiss at 4:00 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Every single person I've met today has had a huge grin on their face. Everyone has asked me how I feel about it all (tired, happy). People seem RELIEVED.
posted by chuckdarwin at 4:04 AM on November 5, 2008


What's with all the corks on your hat?

They're a relic of a WW2 cargo cult.

The theory is that if you provide the corks, the bottles of booze will come.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:05 AM on November 5, 2008 [12 favorites]


A Spoon Full of Sugar Makes the Medicine Go Down In the Most Delightful Way.
posted by gman at 4:05 AM on November 5, 2008


I'm not an American, but my wife is, and people have been congratulating me all morning at work here in London. Good times.
posted by Happy Dave at 4:06 AM on November 5, 2008


You have chosen...wisely.

If you'd chosen the other one, America, you'd have all turned into dusty skeletons and screamed as the visual effects ravaged you.

(Okay -- that might have been an Indiana Jones movie, but I'm still pretty sure it applies here.)
posted by CheeseburgerBrown at 4:07 AM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


The wicked witch is dead!
posted by gman at 4:07 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thank you.
posted by londontube at 4:08 AM on November 5, 2008


A Spoon Full of Brown Sugar Makes the Medicine Go Down In the Most Delightful Way.

(I thought you needed a fix)
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:08 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Cheers, mate. Sorry, I'm a little punchy. What's with all the corks on your hat?

I don't blame you at all for being punchy. I am incredibly proud and happy for you Yanks right now. I guess us Aussies can be a bit like the English, in that when we see 40 kazillion "YEAH!" posts, we will try to inject a point of sarcasm/irony/reality.

We like to keep people on their toes ;)

The corks? Hmm... I just keep them handy to close the half drunk bottles of beer, although they are pretty rare.
posted by Diag at 4:09 AM on November 5, 2008


half drunk bottles of beer

Under Obama - NO MORE RATIONS. The people of this world can drink full beers.
posted by gman at 4:11 AM on November 5, 2008


Guys - as a UKer I'm not allowed an opinion on your elections, but congrats on finding enough people who aren't scared of the black bogey man!

Oh, and even more congrats on the turn out. BBC says some districts are claiming voter turnout of 65-80%. Hell, I think I'd have been happy with any result that came from a turnout that high...

As an aside, are any betting places in the US taking bets on Obama getting shot at before he's inaugurated? I'd have thought that some wackoes somewhere were pretty much guaranteed to give it a go...
posted by twine42 at 4:16 AM on November 5, 2008


SEE!! IT TOOK 63 YEARS, BUT YOU HAVE US AND OUR CORKS TO THANK!!!
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:16 AM on November 5, 2008


In related news, Alan Keyes has 17,757 votes by last count, as compared to Ron Paul's 13,961.

We are 538, we are 538 ...
posted by adipocere at 4:20 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I see world leaders who've long given up on Bush are openly requesting help from Obama. Can't we speed this thing up?
posted by gman at 4:25 AM on November 5, 2008


Oh right, big changes are on the way, huh? We'll see.
posted by winks007 at 4:29 AM on November 5, 2008


Man, this guy better not break our heart. If he does, we'll never trust anyone ever again.
posted by jbickers at 4:30 AM on November 5, 2008


I hope the Obama family names their new puppy Karl Marx.

They can name the cat Secret Muslim.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 4:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


Hard to find the words to convey the total awesomeness, sense of relief, and total disbelief. I'm just so used to losing. I'm just so used to being bummed out. The only point of sadness is the gay marriage ban in California, but in the last eight years I've gotten used to that sort of thing and kind of gotten used to waking up after an election, taking a deep breath, turning off the television, and starting a joyless drive to work.

At least for once the bulk of the news is joyous. And, in Ma. we voted down dog racing, the criminalization of pot, and a crazed ballot measure to essentially eliminate income tax.

So I'm going to enjoy every second of this day and remember that those few hundred thousand people in California who voted to ban gay marriage are old and will be dead very, very soon, and that measure will be overturned by the time my daughter goes to kindergarten. Bite me, you ancient jackasses and all your worthy marriages.
posted by A Terrible Llama at 4:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I see Sarah Palin has been hedging her bet for over a week now. NSFW
posted by gman at 4:32 AM on November 5, 2008


They can name the cat Secret Muslim.

"i'm in yr whitehouse, plotting aginst yr freedumz!"
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:36 AM on November 5, 2008 [11 favorites]


but Obama doesn't even buy a new pair of shoes when he needs them.

I think the point was that he didn't need new shoes, since he got'em resoled, so he didn't buy new shoes. America could use more of that.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 4:36 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I hope the Obama family names their new puppy Karl Marx.

I hope he calls it Maverick.
posted by DreamerFi at 4:36 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


Apart from the fact that The Daily Show is going to be a lot less funny due to a lack of material, I can honestly see no downside to this. Congratulations, America.
posted by spoobnooble at 4:36 AM on November 5, 2008


Even Upside Down Dogs is getting in on the action.
posted by gman at 4:38 AM on November 5, 2008


re-souled.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Rationally, I knew Obama would win. But emotionally, I guess I wasn't sure.

I'm in my 30s, but for my entire life, I have never been able to vote in an election to elect a country's leader, nor have I ever witnessed an election in the country where I lived which wasn't heartbreaking . . . until now.

I grew up in Yugoslavia, with one party rule, a dictatorship, and no real choice.

Just before I was old enough to vote, I watched as Yugoslavia fell apart and my former countrymen voted for nationalist hate-mongers who wanted to destroy my city, family and friends . . . and did a fair job of accomplishing it.

I managed to get to America, but for two presidential elections, I wasn't able to vote because I could not get my citizenship approved, because the US government could not complete a background check, since I had almost no adult records in Bosnia, since I became an adult during the war, and well, there were no records to check. My citizenship was delayed for years, and according to an off-the-record and amiable INS employee - and a US Senator - it had nothing to do with my accomplishments in America (graduating from a good school which I paid for myself by working hard, buying a home, having a good job, volunteering for and supporting charities and community organizations) and everything to do with my nominal "Muslim" identity. I watched, with no right to vote, as GW Bush was elected for two terms and seemed to do everything he could to lessen America in the eyes of most of its citizens and the rest of the world.

Finally, I received my citizenship, and this election was the first time I was able to help decide the leader of a country. I worked hard to learn about the candidates, and choose Barack Obama only after a careful review of his policies and those of the other candidates. I volunteered to help his campaign, and I was so excited to vote for the first time, though I had to do an absentee ballot from Romania.

I woke up this morning to see that Obama had won, and I burst into tears. Somehow, despite his standing in the polls, I anticipated bad news. I've been stunned for hours.

I'm realistic, and I know that it will be near impossible for any person to live up the expectations many of us have for Obama. The country is in a mess, and I compare it to my kitchen: five minutes to turn it into a disaster, half a day to clean it up.

But for the first time in my whole life, I've witnessed an election in which the choice which was made is better than what the alternative would have been. I've lived a third of a century without this ever having happened. It feels pretty damned special to me.
posted by Dee Xtrovert at 4:38 AM on November 5, 2008 [93 favorites]


Sorry, I'm a bit giddy, I meant: I was disappointed not with him because ofr her...
posted by ponystyle at 4:39 AM on November 5, 2008


"I can see change from my house!"

T-Shirt? Please, pretty please??
posted by jeanmari at 4:44 AM on November 5, 2008


Dee Xtrovert, here's another former Yugoslav who just became a citizen and cast her first vote yesterday for Obama. A new day is dawning for all of us.
posted by Dragonness at 4:45 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


The Daily Show is going to be a lot less funny due to a lack of material.

I don't think this is true. I don't think they're going to run out of stuff any time soon, and if they do... it will be a small price to pay for a better world.
posted by chuckdarwin at 4:49 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


He asked that I believe in him, in my country, my people and in myself.... I believed.
He asked that I volunteer.... I volunteered.
He asked that I donate.... I donated.
He asked me to vote.... I voted.
And we did it!

That was the easy part. Now the real work begins and I'm ready.
posted by SoulOnIce at 4:52 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


News from Michigan:

Prop 1 for Medical Marijuana AND Prop 2 for Stem Cell Research PASSES!!!

For those in other states, Prop 2 faced some VERY aggressive resistance from a well organized anti-prop 2 organization. I saw a LOT of "2 goes 2 far" signs go up, and a lot of those ads too. It was crazy.

We get the icing on the cake despite that, I am such a happy man!!!
posted by JoeXIII007 at 4:53 AM on November 5, 2008


After Mccain's and Obama's speeches I closed some of the tabs I was using to follow events as they unfolded, but then I wanted to check one of the tabs I closed, so I in order to get to it again, I go to the browser's tabs, there's File, Edit, View, History.

It is History, indeed.

Congratulations.
posted by micayetoca at 4:55 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


O, My God.
posted by gman at 5:00 AM on November 5, 2008


Halfway through the precincts, Ted Stevens is winning.

I almost want him to win, just to watch the vote in the Senate.

"Motion to expel Sen. Ted Stevens from the United States Senate"


No way man! I can't imagine this happening because it would lead to this:

"Todd, I know you're out there workin' hard on your snow machine and all, but I need you to go on down to Washington and be our new maverick Senator, doncha know."
posted by Pollomacho at 5:01 AM on November 5, 2008


Today's front pages. Yay!
posted by gubo at 5:02 AM on November 5, 2008


Truly the end of an error.
posted by punkfloyd at 5:03 AM on November 5, 2008 [15 favorites]


Pollomacho, a special election will be held to elect Stevens's replacement. But Palin may be able to appoint an interim senator in the meantime, the law is unclear.
posted by gubo at 5:07 AM on November 5, 2008


I woke up hungover and a little confused wearing an old 'Cheeseburger in Paradise - Waikiki' shirt. I turned on the news and just started bawling again.
posted by xorry at 5:08 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Limp from celebrating until 3am and by the time I headed home to sleep the cars were still honking their horns, people leaning out of their windows all over the place to rejoice and shout OBAMA! People openly weeping in gladness and RELIEF. what a celebration. Sat with my neighbors and talk about having never seen anything like this in our lives, the lines to vote, the hope, impassioned interest awakened after decades of apathy. Obama's acceptance speech was awesome. He's a very good speaker, wow.

One of my neighbors had been a McCain supporter. When I said I think McCain maybe had been a better man but had sold out, we discussed that it was such a gigantic mistake for him to choose Palin. The brilliant Zina Saunders has an excellent cartoon of the day after for McCain/Palin (her artwork is now something I regularly check on now).

This neighbor, who felt McCain had been set up to lose by the Republican Party, who he said hated McCain for the last 20 years (is this true?) had become increasingly embittered and cynical these last few years and there he was, former McCain supporter, now shouting at the TV set cheering for Obama.

What an amazing event this is. Am looking forward to walking out into the street today to see people's faces and talk about this victory.
posted by nickyskye at 5:19 AM on November 5, 2008 [6 favorites]


I keep getting all teary-eyed at random moments. People are gonna think I'm a sad Republican if I can't get the waterworks under control!

(This was the first time I voted for President- makes victory feel all the sweeter :)
posted by Mouse Army at 5:20 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


ValkoSipuliSuola, I said the exact thing to my wife earlier. I feel like, when someone asks me where I'm from, I don't have to shrug my shoulders, wince, and say, uh, America. I feel proud (again, for all of the people willing to jump on me) to be American, to be from America.

Going home is a possibility for me, not just a pipe dream anymore. I mean, I'd always thought I could go home, but on my visits home recently, I had NOT wanted to stay long. The tenor, the culture, it wasn't what I'd been brought up in. Maybe, just maybe, this is the beginning of significant change, something that will make America a place I'd be happy to live in again.

And to every other American overseas, Flapjacks (someday I'll come to a meetup), Bardic, Chuckdarwin, Valko, and all the rest, come on over sometime. This champagne is almost done, but we can get some more.
posted by Ghidorah at 5:24 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Thank you, my fellow Americans, thank you very much.
posted by tommasz at 5:27 AM on November 5, 2008


Pollomacho, a special election will be held to elect Stevens's replacement. But Palin may be able to appoint an interim senator in the meantime, the law is unclear.

So in that case I see 60 days later on a stage in Nome:

"You see my husband Todd, the first dude, has the experience he needs to be elected Senator, he's served for the last 60 days in the position, and he's a maverick!" *winks*
posted by Pollomacho at 5:29 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


As a Swede, I'm really glad that your extreme right-wing candidate won, and not the ultra-extreme right-wing candidate.
posted by martinrebas at 5:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [25 favorites]


You can play Super Obama World here.

What a great time to be alive.
posted by Sailormom at 5:32 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I'm still floating. Just got teary eyed spotting the Washington Monument on my commute and bought two Washington Posts...one to read, one to save for my niece and nephews.

I'm actually not feeling the schadenfreude I thought I would. I may be turning into a hippie.
posted by JoanArkham at 5:33 AM on November 5, 2008


I've been reading this thread over at Little Green Footballs, where they're claiming Obama illegally "bought" the election...

Um, doesn't the right think money equals speech?
posted by Mental Wimp at 5:34 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thanks Obama. You're makin' us multiracial types proud.
posted by danb at 5:34 AM on November 5, 2008


The light at the end of the tunnel- I see it.

So much WIN it tickles me to the cockles of my heart, and does my heart good. Free at last, free at last.
posted by Patapsco Mike at 5:35 AM on November 5, 2008


My first political memory is the Iran hostages. I grew up under Reaganite fear of nuclear death. I liked Clinton, but marched against war in yugoslavia (i guess, all foreign war). I got used to America being sane under Clinton, and stared slack jawed at the screen when Bush 2 was elected, and even more slack jawed when he won again (WTF were you thinking?) but tonight I am totally, 100% a believer in the American dream. I do believe you guys can do things that are good, I do believe you can lead the world again. I know where some of the negative, cynical foreigner posts are coming from, I've been a harsh critic myself, and you guys have really sucked, like the new girlfriend of a good mate who obviously deserves better, but now you are smart, and good and pure again. I'm so full of love I am dusting off the old plans for a family road trip across the USA (a big deal when it will cost $10k in flights to get to LA).
I want so hard for Obama to be a genuine, caring, tough, loving, responsible leader it hurts. Please, please bring me a West Wing leader.
posted by bystander at 5:35 AM on November 5, 2008


I just got up to see if I had just had a great dream or if it was real. I heard some young folks pass by and scream "Obama!" Can't tell if they're up early or still up from the night before, but I am smiling.
posted by Mental Wimp at 5:35 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm no longer an atheist.
posted by gman at 5:45 AM on November 5, 2008


And the Munchkins sing: Ding dong, the witch is dead.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 5:47 AM on November 5, 2008


SQUEEEEEEEEEEE!!

Now get to work.
posted by LMGM at 5:48 AM on November 5, 2008


This was the first time I voted for President- makes victory feel all the sweeter

Not to diminish the poigniancy of your moment, congrats, really, I mean it. It is truly a great thing. But I think it is much sweeter to have fought and lost the last two elections to that complete douche, and now to feel all that shame for your country lifted.
posted by Pollomacho at 5:49 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


OK America, your time out is over. You can now come back with us and play.
posted by NewBornHippy at 5:53 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I'm no longer an atheist.

Please don't run for office in North Carolina.
posted by Pollomacho at 5:53 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I was really impressed by McCain's concession speech. I want to win the respect of those who booed. I'm going to school in the Kentucky bluegrass, and I want appalachia to feel pride in this president.

On whole, I think our energy is prevailing.

I moved to the Virginia suburb's of DC shortly after the Bush-Gore election, before we really knew who won. My first memory of my new school was sitting in my history class talking to the other kids about who would become president, who deserved to be president, and who we wanted to be president.

My school was 6 miles from the Pentagon, and on 9/11 I remember coming home and wondering if anything would ever be close to normal in daily life again. Other than a big hole in the Pentagon, it was hard to feel the impact. To a kid in the suburbs, 9/11 changed nothing in everday terms except news items - it was all abstract. Likewise, the 8 years of Bush administration have not been so bad for me - it's just the worry of where we're headed, and the knowledge that others (from Anacostia to Iraq) haven't been so fortunate.

I'm 19. My whole political life has been defined by opposition. The PATRIOT Act, the war in iraq, the deficit, hurricane katrina, torture, global warming - a seeming endless list of grievance. My default state has been cynical leering at the absurdity of our situtation, occasionally listing in to straight out elitism - why the hell couldn't they understand that Bush was getting it all wrong.

Barack Obama gave many of my age reason to stop being snide and start being earnest. To actually do something, to care about something, instead of resigning ourselves to simply being more aware than the average joe of our demise. A lot of people just bought the t-shirts, went to a rally, partied like a Barack-Star. Okay, not a bad start. But I hope many can take the central message of the campaign to heart - that a great man like Barack Obama can get things done in government, but real change has to come from the grass roots. The election has been won, and the real campaign begins. I'm probably not going to agree with everything Obama does in office but I think he'll do it all in a way Americans can feel proud of.
posted by phrontist at 5:57 AM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


A Spoon Full of [Brown] Sugar Makes the Medicine Go Down In the Most Delightful Way.

Ah brown sugar, how come you taste so good?
posted by orange swan at 5:58 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I'm Irish, living in the UK, and I stayed up until 6am British time to watch Obama's speech. I'm quite stunned that from January 20th we'll be seeing "President Obama" in the White House. I don't think I really believed the US could do it.

After I slept for about 5 hours, I woke up with a horrible feeling that a lot of states that had previously declared for Obama had retracted and McCain was now ahead and there was a great danger of him reaching 270.

I checked the internet straight away and felt a hell of a lot better.

Now let's just hope that he is all he has promised to be.
posted by knapah at 5:59 AM on November 5, 2008


Damn America, you're looking FINE today.
posted by gman at 6:01 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


The only point of sadness is the gay marriage ban in California

Here in Arkansas, anti-gay bigotry was sufficient to pass a law prohibiting all "unmarried" couples from fostering or adopting kids. Not just bigoted, not just worded with language so lying that the air quotes dick fingers practically hit you in the face, but it potentially invalidates the part of my will where I declare who gets custody of my son.

If you're in Arkansas and voted for prop 1, I'd say fuck you, but I figure President Obama is a big enough fuck you right now.
posted by middleclasstool at 6:03 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Just watched Obama's victory speech and it put a lump in my throat...

Steve Bell
... genius as ever.
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 6:04 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I have a lot of mixed emotions about Jesse Jackson, but when I saw that man standing silently and sobbing, it was more than I could handle. I broke down and wept for a very long time. I still can't quite reckon what it is that I'm feeling, maybe it's been so long since I've felt it I just don't remember, but it certainly feels good.
posted by psmealey at 6:07 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I have my iPod set to random. And when I left the house this morning for work, I turned it on and this was the first song:

Everybody look around
’cause there’s a reason to rejoice you see
Everybody come out
And let’s commence to singing joyfully
Everybody look up
And feel the hope that we’ve been waiting for

Everybody’s glad
Because our silent fear and dread is gone
Freedom, you see, has got our hearts singing so joyfully
Just look about
You owe it to yourself to check it out
Can’t you feel a brand new day?
Can’t you feel a brand new day?
Can’t you feel a brand new day?
Can’t you feel a brand new day?


So whoever runs my universe thinks it's a GREAT day! So many people were smiling on my train!

Let us be glad. But then let us get to work, America. It's not just Obama alone who will makes the changes this country so desperately needs. It's all Americans, and we have a lot to do.
posted by droplet at 6:08 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Damn America, you're looking FINE today.

Yes... have you been working out? I'm sorry I haven't been returning your calls for the last eight years. I've been just soooo busy. But my schedule seems to be clearing up. Want to have a beverage sometime soon? How about Friday night? Call me.
posted by orange swan at 6:08 AM on November 5, 2008 [16 favorites]


President. Barak. Hussain. Obama. It just kinda rolls of the tongue, doesn't it?

My only worries are a) how badly will Bush fuck shit up in his remaining 79 days as president, and b) the fact that we're about to see the right go into a spasm of hatred that will make the Clinton years look like a love fest.

But for now, I'm celebrating. There's time to worry about the problems later, for now, I'm just basking in the warm glow of knowing that America made the right choice.
posted by sotonohito at 6:10 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I finally got the time to watch the speech in Grant Park, and the tears I've been holding back broke through. God damn, I feel hope again.
posted by Ghidorah at 6:11 AM on November 5, 2008


Jessie Jackson was crying because he realized it wasn't simply racism which kept him out of the White House.
posted by gman at 6:11 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


I know nobody will see the comments this far down, but I couldn't have asked for a better first presidential election to vote in.
This is something I'm going to be able to tell my kids about, someday.

I'm still trying to be realistic about it though.
We got this far, and there is still a lot of work to be done.

But still. I can't believe it. I'm actually proud of my country for the first time since I was in high school. 8 years is a long time.

I was 12 when Bush took office, and soon after that learned only to be disgusted and ashamed of my country and its government.

But it's all over. Probably. And the feeling of relief I got when he was giving his speech was indescribable. I've got nothing but hope for the next four years. Yes we can.

Yes, we did.

Finally.
posted by CitrusFreak12 at 6:12 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I still can't believe that Jack Bauer stopped the assassination plot, hijacked that plane, tortured that arab, revealed and neutralized an incredible governmental conspiracy involving double-quadruple agents, and still had time to deliver an Obama victory with a single vote all within 24 hours! God damn.
posted by milarepa at 6:13 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Today, the 5th of November, 2008, feels like the first day of the 21st century.
posted by Neilopolis at 6:13 AM on November 5, 2008 [11 favorites]


Please, let this thread out comment that epic Palin thread. Oh yeah . . .

OBAMA!!!!11111
posted by IvoShandor at 6:16 AM on November 5, 2008


Your revolution is over, Mr Cheney. Condolences! The cunts lost.


(And, as a liberal ethno who loves the ideals of democracy, liberty, opportunity and unyielding hope - bring it!!)
posted by laumry at 6:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Jessie Jackson was crying because he realized it wasn't simply racism which kept him out of the White House.

You can win, Jesse, you can win!
posted by bwg at 6:17 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I keep picturing Eugene V Debs and MLK playing cards and Malcolm X comes over every once in awhile and says, "Socialists," and they all laugh their asses off. Much like I'm doing this morning.
posted by sleepy pete at 6:20 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


I have a lot of mixed emotions about Jesse Jackson, but when I saw that man standing silently and sobbing, it was more than I could handle. I broke down and wept for a very long time.

Yeah, me too, psmealey.
posted by sleepy pete at 6:22 AM on November 5, 2008


Happy... that is the thing I can think about. Happy.
posted by austinetsu at 6:23 AM on November 5, 2008


Richard Pryor was the first black president!
posted by bwg at 6:23 AM on November 5, 2008


You people are all sick and twisted. Obama lied to you all. He lied to me. I still get SPAM in my email. The Sun didn't rise any earlier, My 401k didn't restore itself, and goddammit there's no chicken in my pot!.
posted by Gungho at 6:24 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh, and I think I am going to favorite more comments in this thread than I have favorited since I joined MeFi.
posted by IvoShandor at 6:25 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


This week on Intervention.
Friends and family get together and send the USA into rehab.
posted by Bighappyfunhouse at 6:26 AM on November 5, 2008


In the previous four presidential elections I was driven by my intense dislike of the Republicans and my prime motivation was kicking their ass and shoving it in their faces. But this election I was actually driven by a genuine faith and excitement in a candidate and party, which I didn't realize until a month ago that I hadn't felt in quite a while.

This morning I'm amazed at how much my personal hatred for the current administration has been overshdowed by my hope for the new one. For once I voted FOR something, rather than voting AGAINST something. It feels so much better.
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 6:27 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


Yep, I agree with only about 10% of what Jesse Jackson says but I had a real respect for him and his life's work when I saw his tears of joy last night. Got a huge lump in my throat. To think that he was standing next to Dr. King when he was killed and last night, he was on the front row of true history. Whatever your politics, you have to recognize the significance of this election and let that propel you forward into the future. Obama wasn't my choice but I'm hopeful about the next four years and excited to see what is coming.
posted by pearlybob at 6:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Groovy pictures from around the world.
posted by nicolin at 6:33 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


WOO HOO!!!!
posted by onepapertiger at 6:36 AM on November 5, 2008


Dear Mr. Harper,

Now that you're not going to have a dick in the White House to suck, can we move back to our Canadian values?


Sincerely,

The 416ers, the 709ers, the 514ers, and the rest of our Concerned Citizens
posted by gman at 6:36 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Let's start socializing!
posted by snofoam at 6:39 AM on November 5, 2008


Congratulations America!
posted by Duug at 6:40 AM on November 5, 2008


Really? When you were 8 years old, or 10? Never? You grew up faster than I did, then.

Maybe it was just my family, but I don't think so. I always thought of certain countries in Europe as the touchpoints for individual opportunity and fairness (and still do). My political memory in the US goes back to Reagan, who I viewed then and now pretty cynically. And I don't think this was an uncommon thought for an 8-10 year old growing up in Montreal at the time.

The obvious gap between what America so often presented itself as, to itself and the world at large, what it could be, what I had believed it to be when I was a child, and the reality of what it so clearly was -- for decades that's underpinned much of my anger and resentment. I've always known this.

Yes.

But again, what I was trying to say upthread was that I would like very much to let that resentment go. America's never going to be the nation 1950's Hollywood made it out to be -- of course not. But maybe, just maybe, it can be a force for good in the world. Like I said: for the first time in decades, I'm feeling this afternoon like it could happen.

Oh hell, yes. Nothing I want more. And I cried last night, and I cried again this morning. (Although, I should confess I've cried watching Star Trek. So... You know.)
posted by ~ at 6:46 AM on November 5, 2008


I have to admit, I fell asleep while waiting for the election results, after eating a big bowl of election night ice cream. But I kept my little "We the People" voting sticker. Yay, Obama!
posted by Marie Mon Dieu at 6:46 AM on November 5, 2008


It's being reported that Obama has offered Illinois Democrat Rahm Emanuel the job of Chief of Staff.
posted by IvoShandor at 6:49 AM on November 5, 2008


We've had decent and respectable Presidents in my lifetime, but they've all seemed so far removed from where I live, how I think day-to-day. Too busy, perhaps, to know the music I know, to like the things I like ... or maybe, to be concerned over the worries that keep me awake.

So it strikes me so directly that we've a President-elect so culturally aware as this. It's not enough to say that Barack Obama is hip or cool. Anyone can fake the funk, so to speak. This man is different.

As soon as he said last night, "It's been a long time coming," I knew what he would say next.

Because at random moments this past week, I've been thinking about Sam Cooke. I've heard him singing in the quiet moments at work, walking out to my car, going to sleep. "But now I think I'm able ... I'm able to carry on." While Obama has been using Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed, Delivered" and Jackie Wilson's "Higher and Higher" at every campaign stop, the soundtrack of this effort has always been "A Change Is Gonna Come."

And now it has.
posted by grabbingsand at 6:50 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


The Franken race is no joke. 1,210,942 to 1,210,371.
posted by gman at 7:03 AM on November 5, 2008


YAY!
posted by contessa at 7:06 AM on November 5, 2008


God I hope that Missouri stays in the McCain column so that we don't have to hear the bellewether crap next time.
posted by a robot made out of meat at 7:07 AM on November 5, 2008


My husband is still wandering around pinching himself and repeatedly asking me if it really happened. I keep trying to reassure him, but after so much hope has been stolen from us in the last 8 years, it is hard to believe.

As much as many Democrats couldn't quite believe they would win, I think Republicans didn't really believe they wouldn't. I suspect there are a lot of people this morning shocked that their prayers didn't somehow work. Welcome to my last 8 years!
posted by threeturtles at 7:08 AM on November 5, 2008


Now to wait out the next two and a half months....Yay Obama!
posted by Atreides at 7:09 AM on November 5, 2008


Has The Daily Show used the phrase "failed Obama Administration" yet, or are they waiting for the Inauguration?
posted by Kirth Gerson at 7:11 AM on November 5, 2008


That sounds more like a Colbert Report joke to me, Kirth Gerson.
posted by orange swan at 7:13 AM on November 5, 2008


It all seems kind of unreal to me still. But in a weird way, I feel like I can maybe extrapolate why people were so nuts when Kennedy won, this sense of the paradigm's shifting, there's somebody in charge now who maybe understands how the world's changing and so on. I don't know... I'm sure he'll disappoint me at some point, but if nothing else the fact that the country was capable of voting in such big numbers for the kind of campaign Obama ran makes me feel really, really good. Y'know, rejecting the anti-intellectual/jes' folks/real america bullshit that Bush was dining out on (and that McCain and-- especially-- Palin were serving up). And it was great to see this happen to somebody who wasn't initially served up by the party machinery-- a Gore or Kerry win wouldn't have felt this seismic I don't think.
posted by COBRA! at 7:13 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


The only point of sadness is the gay marriage ban in California

Not just a point of sadness, but an ironic comment on the election as a whole. The majority of African American voters in CA voted for the ban. The same folks who were voting for the first African American president. Obviously AA voters are not any more responsible for the ban than are any other voters who voted for it, but their myopia about bigotry is particularly striking from this group in this election.
posted by OmieWise at 7:15 AM on November 5, 2008 [14 favorites]


Like someone else upthread, my husband and I were reminded of his similarities to the Kennedys of the 60s. (We thought it was more JFK than Bobby, but it still stands. Definitely NOT Ted, of course.) I still can't believe we will have a president we can look to for optimism and ideals. The most significant comment he made for me was "to those who didn't vote for me, I'll be your president, too." That man knows what he's doing, and he is exactly what we need. Thank the deity of your choice that this man wants to do the right thing, because he could be dangerous otherwise. For those of you who don't believe he will do the right thing: have a little faith.
posted by mitzyjalapeno at 7:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


This is why we can, sometimes, have nice things.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 7:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [11 favorites]


I realized this morning that my husband and the PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE UNITED STATES were born in the same decade.

My sister realized that we are closer in age to OUR PRESIDENT ELECT than our parents are.

That feels good.
posted by Lucinda at 7:17 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Uh-oh... here comes Bush...
posted by bookwo3107 at 7:20 AM on November 5, 2008


Uh-oh... here comes Bush...

There he goes ruining everything again.
posted by gman at 7:23 AM on November 5, 2008


So my first thought when I woke up this morning is I want a POTUS who blogs. Wouldn't that be cool? Wouldn't it be great if Obama just wrote at least a few sentences a day letting us know what is going on? Today, for example, who did he call? Who called to congratulate him? How is he feeling? Has the adrenalin rush abated yet? Overwhelmed by the burden or excited by the possibilities? What is Michelle thinking? Is she going shopping for all the new clothes she is going to need? Has she gotten her Inaugural Ball gown yet? And puppy? What kind? My brain is bubbling with thirst for information.

Last night before falling asleep we talked about the girls and how much fun it will be to have children in the White House. We talked about the youngest (Sasha?) for example and how the next eight years (fingers crossed) will seem like her whole life. The way that the White House will be their playground as well as their home. All the nooks and crannies will be known to them. All the staff. Not only is Barack Obama an intelligent man with great potential, his marriage and family warms our hearts.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 7:24 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


THIS IS GOOD!
posted by Cat Pie Hurts at 8:05 PM on November 4


While I strongly agree with the sentiment, I ultimately doubt that Obama will actually change America. The system is so much bigger than one man, and it is that system which is corrupt and broken.

Clinton promised you accessible health care, but after winning the election his economic advisors told him it was unfeasible. Obama has the exact same group of people as HIS economic advisors...


In any case, congrats Mr. Obama, and good luck!
posted by Vindaloo at 7:25 AM on November 5, 2008


you dropped the o bomb!
posted by chelegonian at 7:26 AM on November 5, 2008



MasonDixon,
Thanks for an interesting answer. I suppose a country that thinks of itself as a collective experiment has a lot to care about with its leaders. (Mine is just an ancient blob of language-users and customs). It is nice to see people happy with their politics. In my country, we had a dawn like this about ten years ago - come to think of it, that came with a little burst of national pride. I'd forgotten that.

I hope he has some good social plans (there were things in his speech about all that) and doesn't get tangled up in any wars the people specifically ask him to get out of.
posted by grapefruitzzz at 7:27 AM on November 5, 2008


What's already been said: It feels so good to have voted FOR someone, not AGAINST someone.

Our native Floridians surprised me. They came around for Clinton, and they came around for Obama. Still voted something like 65%/35% to literally define marriage as "one prong one socket" in the state constitution though. :p I'd like to blame that on excellent/poor marketing on the ammendment's behalf, and not the voters, but still, meh.

79 days!

I'm so excited! We're going to have eloquent, thoughtful, well spoken addresses! Can you imagine the fireside chats? OOOH! Podcast gold!

And to answer the President-Elect's call: Yes, yes we can. If he wants me to volunteer an extra X hours a week, yes I can. If he wants me to drive 100 miles to help build something, yes I can. Just say the word, Mr. President.
posted by cavalier at 7:29 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


In case you weren't refreshing all the different websites last night, here are a few right after the election was called (self link).
posted by starman at 7:29 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


their myopia about bigotry is particularly striking from this group in this election

I can think of so many historical examples of that kind of thing, OmieWise. Tragically the very people who have to fight hardest for their rights often are so unwilling to acknowledge the rights of others. During the days of the underground railroad in the states, there were anti-abolitionists who turned against one prominent underground leader because she gave shelter to wives and children who were trying to escape their abusive husbands and fathers. I've seen an old suffrage poster that depicted a properly corseted and hatted white woman and a wizened, decrepit Chinese man and bore the text (to the best of my memory), "You let foreign scum have the vote but you won't let your good white women vote."

I also seem to recall an anecdote about a gay visitor to a Holocaust museum that I think was told on MeFi and that, when I read it, saddened me to a point beyond tears. Ah, here it is.

We so need to get beyond this arbitrary polarized "them and us" thinking, or we're not going to survive.
posted by orange swan at 7:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


I still can't believe it. What a great day for America and the world.
posted by Outlawyr at 7:31 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Uh-oh... here comes Bush...

Bush talking about Obama ascending the steps of the Capitol to take the oath made me tear up a little. ** blink, blink ** George W Bush said something that made me cry from happiness...

Hope. Change.
posted by anastasiav at 7:34 AM on November 5, 2008


Secret Life of Gravy writes "So my first thought when I woke up this morning is I want a POTUS who blogs. Wouldn't that be cool?"

Comments would have to be turned off. It would be a madhouse otherwise, worse than newspaper article comments.
posted by krinklyfig at 7:34 AM on November 5, 2008


From sy's link:

It's coming to America first,
the cradle of the best and of the worst.
It's here they got the range
and the machinery for change
and it's here they got the spiritual thirst.
It's here the family's broken
and it's here the lonely say
that the heart has got to open
in a fundamental way:
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A.

posted by ND¢ at 7:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Someone waited till last night after 9pm to steal my election sign. Either they were angry jerks who wanted to burn it (good luck, it was vinyl!) or they wanted a souvenir (which is still petty theft).

Hell it wasn't even my sign, I borrowed it from a Dem friend who was going out of town last week.

But then, I'm in pure-red Collin County, Texas. So it could be many flavors of idiocy.

The nice thing, though, is that it. doesn't. matter. We won.
posted by emjaybee at 7:38 AM on November 5, 2008


cavalier writes "And to answer the President-Elect's call: Yes, yes we can. If he wants me to volunteer an extra X hours a week, yes I can. If he wants me to drive 100 miles to help build something, yes I can. Just say the word, Mr. President."

See, this is why this is going to work. I'm not as concerned about centrist or progressive. There are really serious problems we're dealing with and that are coming up, and if there is that spirit of sacrifice and commitment to work which Obama has cultivated and now intends to draw upon further, I think we'll be OK. It's not going to be easy, but I think we'll end up alright.
posted by krinklyfig at 7:40 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]




This shit is sort of a reality check, but I don't want to be that guy.

Yaay!
posted by Bokononist at 7:45 AM on November 5, 2008


I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we've come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds."

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.
My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by a sign stating: "For Whites Only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until "justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream."¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest -- quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."²

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning:

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!

Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!
posted by caddis at 7:46 AM on November 5, 2008 [13 favorites]


If Bush agrees, can Obama simply assume power today?
posted by gman at 7:47 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


A note of caution, Russia has announced new missilie deployment in it's far west today as the USA celebrates.

Sincere congratulations America, I hope that Obama is steady at the helm and makes the right choices next year. Still a big bad world out there, but hopeful it will be better with the choice you made yesterday and the choices you make in the future.
posted by Gratishades at 7:52 AM on November 5, 2008


I celebrated last night, it was exciting.

I woke up this morning to find that Cap'n Crunch still cuts the roof of my mouth.

No politician focuses on the problems of real, everyday people trying to navigate their way through breakfast without injury. I hope Obama's the one who finally teaches these clowns a lesson.
posted by scabrous at 7:56 AM on November 5, 2008


President Barack Obama

They can never take this day away from us. And in many ways it fixes the last 8 years of anti-American politics. Yesterday we were a nation that would elect George Bush, twice. Today we are a nation that would elect Barak Obama. Not because he's black, but because he's right for America. Because he wants to take the nation in the direction we feel it should go.

Simply put - In a time of unprecedented crisis for America and the world we had to make a choice. We could choose a conservative path based on fear and privilege and religious ideology. Or we could choose a liberal path based on the hopes and dreams of the common man.

As the world held it's breath, we chose hope over fear.
posted by Ragma at 7:57 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


The party I was at in Toronto was mental. People were so fucking excited when he won. It is a good day.
posted by chunking express at 7:58 AM on November 5, 2008


I was too caught up in the sheer happeningness of it all last night for it to sink in. It only really hit home this afternoon as I was listening to my iPod on the Tube to work. The Pogues, "The Body of an American". A specific tale of immigrant experience that sounds utterly universal. "I'm a free born man of the USA!".

Seemed to get something in my eye at that point.

Welcome back, guys. We missed you; we truly did.
posted by flashboy at 7:58 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Never get tired* of folks saying because a man is a democrat or because he favors social equality and justice that somehow that turns him into a nincampoop when it comes to world affairs.

Obama has a team. Obama has a posse. Including foreign affairs scholars and the like. There'll be rough times. I have no doubt has the intellectual fortitude to not only conjecture, but to listen, and therefore, mix it up proper like.

* - This is a lie. It ticks me off every time. Does it show?
posted by cavalier at 7:58 AM on November 5, 2008


no doubt he, ahem.
posted by cavalier at 8:00 AM on November 5, 2008


Is anyone still unclear about what a community organizer does? Just checking!
posted by snofoam at 8:00 AM on November 5, 2008 [11 favorites]


The party I was at in Toronto was mental. People were so fucking excited when he won. It is a good day.

I was thinking to head out, but I was enjoying myself too much in the company of Mefites worldwide.
posted by gman at 8:01 AM on November 5, 2008


I've been thinking this morning and have come to the conclusion that I am glad that John Kerry lost four years ago.

Had Kerry won, our country would have limped along with pretty much the status quo in a so-so president. It took the complete horror of a Bush administration to make this country come together and say that we've had enough of this shit--we need a whole new direction for our nation.

Barack Hussein Obama is the leader who is ready to take us in that whole new direction. Had Kerry been elected four years ago, we wouldn't have Obama in the position he is right now.

THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY--NOT JUST FOR LOSERS ANYMORE!
posted by leftcoastbob at 8:01 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


I had thought Nixon was bad until W. The neocons have all but destroyed this nation. It will take a hell of a lot of work to bring us back to where we were, and it won't always go smoothly.

But by God we have done something right and we ought to congratulate ourselves for it.

Go us! Go U.S.!
posted by Guy_Inamonkeysuit at 8:05 AM on November 5, 2008


God DAMN I have a wicked hangover.
posted by chugg at 8:09 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


scabrous, you don't need Barack Obama for that, you just need Neal Stephenson to help you out!
posted by mannequito at 8:10 AM on November 5, 2008


Gore Vidal was great fun with David Dimbley during the BBC coverage.
posted by davemee at 8:11 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Of course, there are a shitload of disgruntled repbulicans out there to deal with, and they won't be as classy as McCain. As I write this the foxsnews.com site is headlined "As He Savours His Historic Victory, Obama Also Faces... A World of Trouble"
posted by TedW at 8:12 AM on November 5, 2008


For christ's sake, he's half-black.
posted by Curry at 8:12 AM on November 5, 2008


Oh -- and I wish George Carlin were here to see this.
posted by Guy_Inamonkeysuit at 8:12 AM on November 5, 2008


Had Kerry been elected four years ago, we wouldn't have Obama in the position he is right now.

Yes, but had Bush not been elected four years ago, the world wouldn't be in the position it is in right now.
posted by gman at 8:13 AM on November 5, 2008


From Peggy Noonan's column gloating over George Bush's 2004 victory:
I do not know what the Democratic Party spent, in toto, on the 2004 election, but what they seem to have gotten for it is Barack Obama. Let us savor.
Heh. Indeed.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse at 8:13 AM on November 5, 2008 [15 favorites]


Here are some pictures from U Street, Washington D.C. last night, sorry for the cell phone graininess.

Cops
Dancin
Posin'
Boomin'
Ridin'
Reflectin'

Keep in mind this is a historically black area of DC that was burned to the ground in 68, and didn't recover until only 4 or 5 years ago. It wasn't any kind of official celebration, people just poured out of the bars and into the streets, hugging and singing, waving american flags and stopping traffic. The drivers didn't mind though, they hopped out and danced too. An Ethiopian restaurant cranked up the soca and a huge crowd gathered around it banging pots and pans and singing in a thousand languages. I've never seen an outpouring of joy in a city like that before, it was probably the best moment of my life so far, and nothing could make me prouder to be American, or from this town.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 8:14 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Many have worked toward this day for years, and now, the sun rises after a long national nightmare.

Another American, sensing dawn after darkness, wrote:

With malice toward none
With charity for all
With firmness in the right as God grants us to see the right
Let us strive on to finish the work we are in
To bind up the nation's wounds
To care for him who shall have borne the battle
And for his widow
And his orphan
To do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace
Among ourselves
And with all nations.


Early, in the midst of injustice and war and lies, one must stand, speak out, and firmly confront misguided power. We continue that work...but it is time now also to reconcile, one with another, unite, and reach out to those whose concerns and fears may have led them to support a different path in America.
posted by fold_and_mutilate at 8:15 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


I thought the best moment last night was MSNBC broadcasting from Spelman College at the moment of McCain's concession. This young black girl in a green top totally fell out, just curled up in a tight ball and was absolutely trembling. Everyone I was watching with went dead silent while the camera was trained down on her for a good ten or fifteen seconds before cutting away. I was like, "holy shit that was fucking powerful!" It felt like I got punched in the chest.

The whole night was crazy, experiencing the rush of this enormous moment in history while totally cognizant of the fact that this is an enormously historical moment and completely revelling in every second of it.

Can we do it again tonight?
posted by The Straightener at 8:21 AM on November 5, 2008


So yesterday, I said that I felt sad for my boyfriend's elderly, McCain supporting father who decided not to vote. This morning, he asked us who was president (he went to bed before it was called). When we told him it was Obama (in a completely flat, non-gloating way), he said, "You just watch, you'll see fascism first hand!" I don't feel so sad for him anymore.
posted by kimdog at 8:22 AM on November 5, 2008


You're a hologram now, Jessica.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 8:26 AM on November 5, 2008


Now we can all join together and run this country as Americans, not red/blue partisans...
Right after the war crimes trials.
posted by Balisong at 8:28 AM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


I spent my evening watching the coverage and knitting a pair of socks. I'm going to tell the person to whom I give the socks that they aren't just any socks; they are historic socks. And also 10% cashmere.
posted to MetaFilter by orange swan at 12:07 AM on November 5, 2008 [36 favorites +]


Now it seems the socks are famous, as well as historic and cashmere.
posted by orange swan at 8:28 AM on November 5, 2008


We were a part of history.
posted by Addiction at 8:31 AM on November 5, 2008


Folks were giddy on the bus this morning in Baltimore, talking about freedom and dreams. At work, the folks who live in Baltimore City proper are also running around giddy and smiling.

I didn't vote for Obama, I don't like him (he'd have, except for his race, been a moderate Republican in my youth), but his victory gives me some small hope that maybe, in the next generation or two, this country will stop being willfully insane on the topic of race.
posted by QIbHom at 8:32 AM on November 5, 2008


We'll trade you one Harper for your Obama.
posted by gman at 8:34 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


A few last thoughts after sobering up and reading all of this --

What strikes me about a lot of the international reaction is relief. A couple years ago I read an article about how disenheartened the international community was over the United States and its current administration -- someone at the U.N. claimed (anonymously) that it had actually gotten to the point where the various U.N. Committees prepared two separate presentations for every issue, one where they invited the U.S. Representative and one where they didn't, because at the one the U.S. attended they had to all dumb down the language to a riduclous extent and at the one without the U.S. attending the other countries could all finally get down to business without having to explain to the U.S. rep what they were talking about every five minutes. The reaction to Obama's winning strikes me as a collective sigh of relief that "oh thank god we can FINALLY get stuff DONE for a change."

Upthread, someone commented that they didn't realize how disenfranchised U.S. voters had felt -- and I think that is the real thing that makes me happy about this election. Because yes, people had felt disenfranchised to the point that they weren't voting. We had an embarrassingly low voter turnout every year, which frustrated me to no end. But it was all because so many people felt so cut off from the process that they didn't think their vote would matter, didn't even bother.

But seeing how many people voted, seeing how many people care about what was happening -- that's the part that made me happy. There's still a lot of work to do, there's still a lot of things that have to be done. But for the first time enough people actually give enough of a shit about things to join in.

Honestly, if I had died without knowing who had actually won, I would have still been happy just from seeing how many people were voting. People stopped feeling disenfranchised before Obama won, and that is the real victory here.

One last note -- as the people around me in the bar were whooping and hollering and carrying on, I noticed I got a text message. It was from my best friend, watching the results at home in Connecticut. She had texted me a single word -- "Amen."
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:37 AM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


What a beautiful world this will be. What a glorious time to be free.
posted by cashman at 8:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Its the spontaneous in-the-street chanting and celebration that's really getting to me. Excitement at a planned political rally I understand. But this? People setting off fireworks, hugging strangers, spontaneously joining a street party from their stuck bus?

Wow.
posted by sandraregina at 8:44 AM on November 5, 2008


We did it. We worked hard, and Obama worked hard, and the man was elected President.

AND I HELPED!
posted by Faint of Butt at 8:50 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Still celebrating.
News from family in Ireland that the parties are still going on.
Poor turnout in workplaces today in Dublin apparently! Well done & huge, huge thanks to Miko in particular for all her posts on this!
posted by Wilder at 8:51 AM on November 5, 2008


On the Big Picture today
posted by device55 at 8:53 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


sandra: It was the total unity of the celebration that was so amazing. Race relations are never too warm in D.C. but just watching blacks and whites hugging and crying, like going specifically up to eachother and embracing hard, hi-fiving with total sincerity... I swear, it was like a reverse Rodney King verdict.

No fights, no violence, no breaking shit, nothing but love and noise and drinks and pot and excitement. Those cops I posted above looked serious for a while, standing in the middle of the intersection, but after a minute or two you could see they were just like, eh, fuck it, and started dancing too.

Bliss.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 8:54 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I hate that I just looked at foxnews. Current frontpage:

As he savours historic victory, Obama also faces...
A WORLD OF TROUBLE --[big Obama pic here]
posted by inigo2 at 8:55 AM on November 5, 2008


We'll trade you one Harper for your Obama.

We'll throw in Celine Deon too!
posted by orange swan at 8:59 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


When do I get my President check?
posted by Senator at 9:01 AM on November 5, 2008


I particularly like it that Obama doesn't feel the need to sugar-coat everything. It will take more than one year or one term to turn things around. It is a long, steep road but if we work together and sacrifice, we will get there.

And he said that he'd listen to us. After eight years of George Bush basically saying, "Fuck y'all" that is a beautiful thing to hear.

I've sent (respectful) emails to the White House over the last two terms and have received an email back within 30 seconds basically saying that they'd received an email from me and that they had traced it and had it on record. I suspect that Obama's automatic email response will be considerably less threatening. He might not agree with me but at least he isn't going to dismiss me.

It is going to be a whole new world out there.
posted by leftcoastbob at 9:01 AM on November 5, 2008


I need to stop reading this thread and getting teary.

Why am I crying? I'm a crusty, cynical old gen x-er, dammit.
posted by JoanArkham at 9:10 AM on November 5, 2008


I can see America again from my house.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 9:10 AM on November 5, 2008 [26 favorites]


Another web-comic tribute, this time from A Softer World. Usually a dark / sarcastic photographic webcomic, this one is without words, and the onmouseover/tooltip caption is "fuck yes." (All the comics have onmouseover/tooltip captions that serve as a second punchline / zinger, which I realized after reading quite a few and missing them).
posted by filthy light thief at 9:13 AM on November 5, 2008




Jettisoned my cynicism for a year and a half to back this guy. Now just want him to prove it wasn't foolish to get all vulnerable and sincere.
posted by adoarns at 9:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


We'll trade you one Harper for your Obama.

No chance! We already offered you the Bush/Harper trade which you refused.

Tell you what, the Bush/Harper trade is still on the table if you're willing to deal...
posted by contessa at 9:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Thankfully, it seems Obama won more votes than Bush in 2004. Really didn't want Bush to keep that record. Obama won more electoral votes, and more individual votes, than Bush ever did. It's like the ambrosia icing on an otherwise heavenly cake.
posted by milarepa at 9:18 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Tell you what, the Bush/Harper trade is still on the table if you're willing to deal...

Portal-style, with conservation of momentum? ... NO. Can't do it. Even an outgoing Bush could do too much bloody damage.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 9:18 AM on November 5, 2008


Congrats from Berlin, it's sure sweet to see Obama win.
But my thoughts and wishes go out to the lgbt people in Arkansas, Florida and California where ignorance and bigotry won.

It's strange, kind of the opposite to germany: here I bet that not in a thousand years a black (or just muslim) candidate could be elected chancellor, at least not until a majority of the populace will be of non-german descent. While there generally seems to be no problem with gay officials, like the mayors of Hamburg or Berlin...

We all still have a long way to go, let's just hope it will take us in the right direction.
posted by kolophon at 9:19 AM on November 5, 2008


Crikey, Fox News is confusing. I thought the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were already won? And that "nation divided" is mostly over this dumb election cycle hype. Oh, and there's gay marriages, immigration reform, and a few other things, too, but I don't think we're really that divided, are we? How can a landslide win result from a divided nation?

But McCain's narrow path to victory was made air tight after he lost Ohio and its 20 electoral votes, and Virginia's 13.

Don't you mean "narrow chance of victory was crushed"? It seems like that line was left over from the pre-produced McCain Wins story, which had to be edited into something .. correct.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:19 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


An anti-gun collectivist elected as president. Someone who thinks government is there to provide things for people rather than to preserve freedom and liberty. Another defeat for freedom and liberty. I'm ashamed to be an American today.

what
posted by oaf at 9:21 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


No chance! We already offered you the Bush/Harper trade which you refused.

Also, just having seen Spamalot, is it wrong that I mentally heard your comment as:

No chance, English bed-wetting types. I burst my pimples at you and call your door-opening request a silly thing, you tiny-brained wipers of other people's bottoms!
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 9:22 AM on November 5, 2008


I can see America again from my house.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium


T-shirt required immediately.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 9:23 AM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


NortonDC and I are not really flag waivers; we are usually more of a quietly patriotic sort. You know, patriotic on the inside. But when we moved into a house together three years ago -- a very sweet little house with a white picket fence and a big yard and a little chimney -- there was a flag out front, and it seemed to fit us. So we left it there, waving.

Two years passed. Two more years of Bush. And I'm sure there was no real connection, but after those two years the flag was not looking so good anymore. There were a few small tears in it, and one very large tear along almost the whole top white stripe from one end to the other where the blue part with the stars began. And it didn't seem like a good idea to display a tattering flag on our front porch, so we took it in.

Last night as I watched the election returns come in, I thought about the flag that had been sitting in our closet for a year, and I got out my sewing kit, and I did a little bit of flag repair 101. I was sewing up the flag when ABC stunningly called the race for Obama at 11pm, and I was sewing it up during McCain's concession speech. And I finally finished during Obama's speech in Grant Park. Then I went out in the dark and put our flag outside for the first time as a homeowner, and I went to pick up NortonDC from the meetup in downtown DC.

I lived in or just outside DC for over a decade, and was here for the Clinton inauguration, but I have never seen DC like this. College kids and other mostly young people literally running around in the streets with Obama signs, every car honking crazily, nobody upset because of the crazy traffic but just full of this joyful, positive spirit. We stuck our hands out our car windows and got high fived by about a hundred crazily exhuberant people running around in the streets in happiness. And I swear I felt our baby moving and kicking around inside because of all the noise.

It's been hard to be a democrat over the last decade. I've felt like we've had the right ideals of believing in lifting up the folks who are on the bottom and trying to make things more equal for everyone, but then the Gore and Kerry elections came and went and it seemed like most of the country did not believe in these ideas. And not only did they reject these ideas, they did them for an empty figurehead like Bush. We went into every election believing that folks would have to see through this Bush guy, right? but somehow we lost, and it was a reflection of democratic incompetence; it meant the populace thought our ideals were wrong.

In a way I've acted during this election in the same way I acted when I was falling in love with NortonDC. I didn't come in as an innocent or naive, but as someone who had been hurt in the past, like a Red Sox fan before 2004. But even when my mind had it's doubts, I tried very hard to always act with an open heart. Part of me felt that Hillary would be tougher and more able to take on the Republican machine that had decimated Gore and Kerry in the past. After Gore and Kerry, I worried over what that same machine would do to Obama. And I was not oblivious to the ugly parts of America that might have trouble electing a minority candidate. But I believed in Obama's message, and he earned, in succession, my primary vote, my donation, and my vote yesterday. And I guess I am surprised, as I was when I fell in love, that somehow things have actually worked out. I don't really understand how it happened. But I believed in it, and it did.

And that's how NortonDC and I arrived home last night, after driving through the exhuberant streets of DC, to be greeted by our little house with its mended flag. I'm ready to do this, Senator Obama. Just tell me where we start.
posted by onlyconnect at 9:25 AM on November 5, 2008 [41 favorites]


This is the first election ever in which everyone I voted for won, and everything I voted for passed. (Okay, the one thing I voted against passed too, but it wasn't something I felt strongly about. It feels good.

To the naysayers: Maybe you could let us have one day to celebrate the fact that we've done something right for a change, before you start bitching about the fact that it hasn't magically resolved all the things we've done wrong?
posted by ook at 9:26 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


As a Swede, I'm really glad that your extreme right-wing candidate won, and not the ultra-extreme right-wing candidate.

McCain got more votes than Barr, but he certainly didn't win.
posted by oaf at 9:30 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


To the naysayers: Maybe you could let us have one day to celebrate the fact that we've done something right for a change, before you start bitching about the fact that it hasn't magically resolved all the things we've done wrong?

How then do you know if you have done something "right". Woe be unto you who think that this will end well.
posted by Gungho at 9:31 AM on November 5, 2008


Keerist. If you've paid any attention at all to the relative behavior of the candidates in this election and still don't know the answer to that question, then I just can't help you.
posted by ook at 9:33 AM on November 5, 2008


(And, seriously, "woe be unto you?" Who talks like that?)
posted by ook at 9:35 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I was just out at Quiznos grabbing a sub here in Toronto and there was one black dude on his cell phone and when he saw my 'Obama For Prime Minister' shirt, he yelled out at me "YES WE DID!". Then the girl in front of me in line was wearing an Obama 08 pin.

You sir, have touched the world.
posted by gman at 9:36 AM on November 5, 2008


Also, I just love the picture of Harper the CBC chose for the "America Votes - Canadian reaction" story. I know photos like this are chosen for a particular slant, but look at this and keep in mind it goes with the title "Harper welcomes Obama victory". Ha!
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 9:37 AM on November 5, 2008


I called my 71 year old mother in California last night to see how the election was going. She told me she voted against Prop 8-- which surprised me because we have not always seen eye-to-eye on gay marriage. She told me that the pastor in her church, Los Altos United Methodist Church, presided over a same-sex marriage. Some members left the congregation over that, but my mom had a chance to talk to the couple. She asked them how long they had been together, they told her 17 years. My mom's marriage lasted 14 years. She decided then that if two people wanted to get married and a church was willing to marry them, why should the government be allowed to step in and deny them? Where is the freedom? Where is the equality? Where is the right to pursuit happiness? I am outraged and so is she. Fuck you, California, for doing the WRONG thing.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 9:40 AM on November 5, 2008 [13 favorites]


"As a Swede, I'm really glad that your extreme right-wing candidate won, and not the ultra-extreme right-wing candidate.

McCain got more votes than Barr, but he certainly didn't win."

You're both wrong. McCain is marginally more conservative than a typical western European Christian Democrat, and Obama is marginally more conservative than a typical western European Social Democrat. Emphasis on marginally.

Certainly neither is extreme in the context of European politics.
posted by aerotive at 9:43 AM on November 5, 2008


Gravy, the No on 8 folks needed your Grandmother.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:45 AM on November 5, 2008


Fuck you, California, for doing the WRONG thing.

Yes because all of us in california voted "yes" we deserve the fuck you on the whole. I live in Los Angeles. I don't know a single person who voted yes.

So thanks for that.
posted by Lacking Subtlety at 9:46 AM on November 5, 2008


Thanks to all the election excitement and thread reading and page reloading, I'm about 2200 words off my Nanowrimo quota.

THANKS, OBAMA!
posted by Lucinda at 9:49 AM on November 5, 2008


Headlines around the world
posted by Potomac Avenue at 9:59 AM on November 5, 2008


You're both wrong.

I was trying to show the silliness of the myth that Obama is somehow a right-wing candidate.
posted by oaf at 9:59 AM on November 5, 2008


I really hope President Obama does have a blog, and an email address someone will actually read. I get the feeling he will listen to us, unlike Bush who's spent the last eight years with his fingers in his ears, ululating.

Very happy and proud of my country today.
posted by bink at 10:01 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


HEY GUYS! ^_^

I was at an election party last night, where we decided that we would follow the results on FOX - we figured that by choosing the most conservative reporting, we were playing it safe. Turns out we got more than we bargained for. It was ceaselessly entertaining. Brit Hume was unable to hide his growing disgust and, I believe, he was intoxicated.

But did anyone else catch John Bolton on BBC? What a tool. A correspondent pointed out that Sarah Palin didn't "energize the base" as much as McCain might have hoped, and Bolton cut her off, snapping "What do you base that on?" When the correspondent pointed out that McCain never really overtook Obama since the RNC, he grumbled "Well, I don't think you understand the Republican party". Well, Bolton, the extremists lost - deal w/ it.

I have to give props to McCain for a gracious concession speech. Some of that respect and reasonableness would have been nice, oh, nine months ago.

Obama's victory spreech was amazing. I've watched it five times already. I'm ecstatic. And now the real work begins.

Thank you, America.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 10:12 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


On the Big Picture today…
posted by device55


Thank you for posting that link, I now have a wonderful photo of President-Elect Obama on both monitors.

(Still pinching myself to make sure it's true.)
posted by ceri richard at 10:12 AM on November 5, 2008


Newsweek just released a "Secrets of the Campaign" article that included tidbits of info like hackers compromising both campaign's computer systems, Palin's shopping spree, and this gem from Obama:

The debates unnerved both candidates. When he was preparing for them during the Democratic primaries, Obama was recorded saying, "I don't consider this to be a good format for me, which makes me more cautious. I often find myself trapped by the questions and thinking to myself, 'You know, this is a stupid question, but let me … answer it.' So when Brian Williams is asking me about what's a personal thing that you've done [that's green], and I say, you know, 'Well, I planted a bunch of trees.' And he says, 'I'm talking about personal.' What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f---ing changed light bulbs in my house. It's because of something collective'."

Man, I love this guy.
posted by jaimev at 10:15 AM on November 5, 2008 [10 favorites]


Comment #911. Time to relocate the sirens.
posted by gman at 10:15 AM on November 5, 2008


Sorry...that link to the Newsweek article should be this
posted by jaimev at 10:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Its been a long time comin, but i know, change gonna come.
Oh, yes it will!
posted by Capt Jingo at 10:17 AM on November 5, 2008


My town voted in favor of Obama by a count of 2008-1889 a close victory, but 2008 votes for him, in 2008, coincidence or awesomeness?

lilkeith, in all fairness, the 1889 is also significant: McCain could have beaten Grover Cleveland.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 10:17 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I think that people of America have made the right choice. Congratulations!
posted by john-hammond at 10:19 AM on November 5, 2008


I give him one year before everyone hates him.

Never gonna happen, my friend. Black elected officials tend to have this Teflon thing going on for them. (See "Mayor for Life" Marion Barry.) Obama could be caught red-handed breaking into Republican headquarters, cheating on his income tax and organizing dog fights in the Rose Garden while in office, but he'll still get re-elected.
posted by Oriole Adams at 10:19 AM on November 5, 2008


lilkeith, in all fairness, the 1889 is also significant: McCain could have beaten Grover Cleveland.

In fact McCain did beat Grover Cleaveland in a foot race by 6 seconds back in high school.
posted by Pollomacho at 10:21 AM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


I think the world owes two people more fruit baskets than they could possibly handle.

First, Tina Fey.

Second, Shepard Fairey.
posted by felix at 10:23 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


President-elect Obama. Oh, it's good to have those words become reality.
posted by gurple at 10:23 AM on November 5, 2008


Thank god (or whoever).

That is all.
posted by alpha_betty at 10:29 AM on November 5, 2008


Meetup on the Mall January 20?
posted by rikschell at 10:34 AM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I was just coming over here to post that Newsweek article because there is some good juicy stuff about Palin, especially this:
Nicolle Wallace had told Palin to buy three suits for the convention and hire a stylist. But instead, the vice presidential nominee began buying for herself and her family—clothes and accessories from top stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. According to two knowledgeable sources, a vast majority of the clothes were bought by a wealthy donor, who was shocked when he got the bill. Palin also used low-level staffers to buy some of the clothes on their credit cards. The McCain campaign found out last week when the aides sought reimbursement. One aide estimated that she spent "tens of thousands" more than the reported $150,000, and that $20,000 to $40,000 went to buy clothes for her husband. Some articles of clothing have apparently been lost. An angry aide characterized the shopping spree as "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast," and said the truth will eventually come out when the Republican Party audits its books.
Theres also a story about her running around in a towel in front of Steve Schmidt and Mark Salter when they were attempting to brief her as well as several instances of her "going rogue." The more that comes out about the behind-the-scenes stuff, the better because Sarah Palin is a diva and can't stop herself from acting like a narcissistic asshole.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 10:36 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


The ball is in your court now America.
posted by Samuel Farrow at 10:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Massive douche chills for people who are buying into this change thing already. Better wait on all this euphoria, folks.

He's already chosen this douchebag as his chief of staff. A right wing democrat, Zionist militant, Freddie Mac board member who is completely bought-and-paid-for by the Daley Machine, Israel and Corporate America.

Obama has just chosen someone to organize his White House who has been part and parcel of the economic crisis and most likely has his sights set on Iran.

If this is not a broken Obama promise already, I really don't what is.

It looks like you are all being sold down the river again.
posted by Zambrano at 10:42 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm proud of this big dumb country of ours, an I'm proud of YOU, MetaFilter!! Honestly, there have been days where Miko and fourcheesemac have been the the only cushions between the wall and my head. Bravo and much love to all of you out there who worked so hard on the campaign. And stop by Mefites For Obama for a a little 'official' celebration!
posted by maryh at 10:45 AM on November 5, 2008


It looks like you are all being sold down the river again.

Can you look into your crystal ball and tell me what other shocking details of the administration await us?
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 10:46 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Zambrano, dial down the rhetoric a little. Rahm Emanuel isn't a Zionist militant. I think you're thinking of his father who was a member of Irgun. My Dad went to law school, but that doesn't make me a lawyer. Capish?
posted by ben242 at 10:49 AM on November 5, 2008


A right wing democrat, Zionist militant, Freddie Mac board member who is completely bought-and-paid-for by the Daley Machine, Israel and Corporate America.

Yeah, Emannuel is such a Zionist Robot he's even credited with orchestrating the Oslo Accords! God, I mean what sort of bloodthirsty animal gets warring factions to sit down and sign a peace accord?
posted by Pollomacho at 10:51 AM on November 5, 2008 [6 favorites]


I feel like I just got a pony.

No, strike that. I feel like I just got 1 * 10^11 ponies.

the power, it goes to 11
posted by zippy at 10:52 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


The ball is in your court now America.

Nope, we just hit a three pointer from mid court at the half time buzzer.
posted by milarepa at 10:54 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hey Zambrano, if you want, I'll be your friend.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:54 AM on November 5, 2008


Zambrano - Not today. k, dude?
posted by gman at 10:55 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


(Is it true that Emmanuel's brother was the inspiration for Ari Gold on Entourage?)
posted by maryh at 10:56 AM on November 5, 2008


It looks like you are all being sold down the river again.

Frankly, I'd rather be on my way down the river than already in Mississippi, which is what McCain/Palin clearly embodied.
posted by milarepa at 10:59 AM on November 5, 2008


Coolest. President. Ever.

From the Newsweek piece:
On the Sunday night before the last debate, McCain's core group of advisers—Steve Schmidt, Rick Davis, adman Fred Davis, strategist Greg Strimple, pollster Bill McInturff and strategy director Sarah Simmons—met to decide whether to tell McCain that the race was effectively over, that he no longer had a chance to win. The consensus in the room was no, not yet, not while he still had "a pulse."
The Washington Post recap is pretty good, but it attributes Obama's win primarily to the economic crisis and the candidates' responses to it, which I disagree with. If you look at the polls, Obama led McCain in the popular vote throughout the entire election after Obama clinched the nomination, except for McCain's spike during the Republican convention, and McCain's numbers had already started to slide before Lehman Brothers collapsed on September 15.

Obama's advisers were "giddy" about McCain's Palin pick, according to the Post piece, and Obama's campaign was more prepared for her than the McCain campaign was:
Palin had been on the Obama short list for a few weeks, and then had been taken off when stories about her efforts to get her brother-in-law fired from the Alaska state police broke.

Dunn, the senior Obama adviser, had the unique perspective of having run a campaign against Palin two years earlier, as an adviser to Alaskan gubernatorial candidate Tony Knowles. She considered Palin a formidable and charismatic politician; she also had a grasp of Palin's thin record and her history on the "bridge to nowhere," and had sat through numerous Palin-Knowles debates.

That Palin expertise, shared by few in the country, would steady the Obama campaign at a moment when national Democrats embarked on what one adviser described as "two weeks of total hysteria" over the Alaska governor.

Dunn had the research staff stop putting so much energy into Palin, convinced that she could not pass the vetting process. "How was I to know that they weren't going to vet her?" she said.
posted by kirkaracha at 11:04 AM on November 5, 2008 [12 favorites]


YES WE CAN!!!!1!! AND FLORIDA TOO!!!!
posted by humannaire at 11:04 AM on November 5, 2008


I want to add my 2 cents. This will be a changed world. A different world. I'm glad I was here to see it. To the dead, I hope you can somehow bear witness. Now I wish the rest of the world would climb on board. Stop all the fighting and the senseless warmongering. Hey kid,
stop all the downloading.

I thought the coolest thing was that Obama said that those laws about baggy pants was a waste of laws, but he did tell the kids to pull up their pants.
posted by doctorschlock at 11:10 AM on November 5, 2008


Take how absolutely horrible I felt for Americans on 911, and reverse it.
posted by gman at 11:13 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


It looks like you are all being sold down the river again.

Frankly, I'd rather be on my way down the river than already in Mississippi, which is what McCain/Palin clearly embodied.


I think I am the one person on earth uniquely qualified to make this comparison. I attended elementary school in the Chicago suburbs that are now Mr. Emanual's district where my brother and I were quite literally the only goyem in the entire school. I had to stand up and explain what Christmas was to my class who found the holiday so pitiful and pityous that they got together a hanukkah kit for my brother complete with chocolate coins, dreidles, and a menorah because we only got one day and they got eight (we dared not explain that though we had but one day, the quality of our gifts far exceded 8 times the value of the socks and shit candy the other kids got on each day). I also attended my undergraduate days as a liberal arts college in Mississippi.

If those are the only options that the whole country must for some bizarre reason live by, I say praise Allah!
posted by Pollomacho at 11:16 AM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Black elected officials tend to have this Teflon thing going on for them.

Like Kwame Kilpatrick?
posted by QIbHom at 11:24 AM on November 5, 2008


(Is it true that Emmanuel's brother was the inspiration for Ari Gold on Entourage?)
posted by maryh at 10:56 AM on November 5 [+] [!]

Yes. Ari Gold is based on Ari Emanuel, and now he and his agency will be even more unbearable...
posted by tinatiga at 11:31 AM on November 5, 2008


When, during the speech, he belted out "All Americans, male or female, young and not so young, black or white or hispanic or asian, gay or straight, disabled and not disabled" I thought it was impossible. It's an action hero speech, a rah rah we defeated the aliens speech, a pre-end-credit-and-swelling-music speech. No politician would actually say that. Not now. not in our poisonous, petty, fetid little cycle.
I was so happy when it didn't fade to black and give a director credit.
Can't wait for the sequel. (the whelk)


Exactly. I couldn't believe the speech - it was almost too emotional (at least on the audience)- and grand, but he was cool as a cucumber. It shows what a homogenous crop of candidates have been winning these election, and what a breath of fresh air someone from outside the normal crop is. I feel like he is a great coach as well as an administrator, which will be a valuable asset now.
posted by uni verse at 11:38 AM on November 5, 2008


Hey everyone! High Five!
posted by Otis at 11:38 AM on November 5, 2008


I bet Muhammad Ali is having a pretty good day toay.
posted by vito90 at 11:40 AM on November 5, 2008


>> Black elected officials tend to have this Teflon thing going on for them.
> Like Kwame Kilpatrick?


Kilpatrick got re-elected while facing a great deal of criticism from both inside and outside Detroit for his handling of affairs in Detroit and mismanagement of funds. He was re-elected under a cloud, but wasn't the subject of official investigation until after his second term started, so there was no official actions going on against him at the time.

For his second term, Kilpatrick came in second in the Democratic primary runoff in 2005. He later won the general election by defeating Freman Hendrix, the winner of the runoff. Kilpatrick's re-election made a lot of us in Michigan scratch our heads, but I couldn't say he was ever Teflon-slick and he was clearly facing a lot of criticism from his own constituents during his time in office.
posted by ardgedee at 11:48 AM on November 5, 2008


great pics: The Next President of the United States
posted by mcstayinskool at 11:50 AM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


O B A M A

N A T I O N
posted by azazello at 11:52 AM on November 5, 2008


In case anyone else is interested in sending flowers or a fruit basket to Tina Fey, I spent a little while on the phone with a large number of bemused New Yorkers trying to find out what the right address should be. It turns out that Rockefeller Center's the wrong place, ironically enough, because apparently she doesn't officially work at SNL any more and has new digs elsewhere.

The address I eventually wound up with was:

Tina Fey
c/o Silvercup Studios
4222 22nd St. Suite #320
Long Island City, NY
11101

As an Angeleno that 'Long Island City' thing looks pretty weird, isn't that just New York? Anyway I figure the mailguy will be able to figure it out from the address and it being New York.

Thanks to the 30 Rockefeller information desk, an NBC news staffer, an NBC Sports staffer, the SNL front desk, an SNL production assistant, the Rockefeller Center Tour ticket signup line, the Silvercup receptionist and a Silvercup production assistant, not necessarily in that order.
posted by felix at 11:53 AM on November 5, 2008 [10 favorites]


I imagine Barack getting to the White House and calling to his aides, "Get me a bucket, a mop, and whole lotta rags!"
posted by Mental Wimp at 11:54 AM on November 5, 2008


All day today I've been grinning my face off every time I hear "President-Elect Obama" (and since I'm listening to NPR nonstop, that's often). Not because I deify the guy. Just because people who care about moving this country beyond hate and plausibly deniable racial/religious bigotry have proved we outnumber the haters and the despisers. Bigotry re sexual orientation will take more time, but we'll keep working on that.
posted by cybercoitus interruptus at 11:56 AM on November 5, 2008


I am so happy. After an eight year long nightmare I can finally look my children in the eyes and tell them that they have a country and a president they can be proud of.
posted by DaddyNewt at 11:56 AM on November 5, 2008


okay, I guess my link above has already been linked further up the thread, but my god there's so many posts in here.

BTW, while the Minnesota senate race won't be decided for about another month (and it's highly unlikely that Coleman loses at this point), it really looks good for Merkley in Oregon right now. All reports show him behind, but there are still about 150,000 votes from Multnomah county (Portland) to be counted. Merkley is stomping Smith there.
posted by mcstayinskool at 11:56 AM on November 5, 2008


As an Angeleno that 'Long Island City' thing looks pretty weird, isn't that just New York?

Long Island City is a particular neighborhood in Queens -- and yes, if that's what the address says, you DO need to render it thus. If you just put "New York, NY" they'll try to deliver it to 22nd Street in MANHATTAN, rather than in Queens. Which could delay, or even prevent, it from getting redirected.

A lot of the outer boroughs have similarly numbered or named streets to streets in Manhattan, and so it does definitely pay to specify "Long Island City" or "Brooklyn" or what have you rather than just putting "New York." (I used to live on a Clinton Street in Manhattan, and was forever getting mail for a "Clinton Street" address in Brooklyn, because senders didn't put "Brooklyn" on the envelopes -- it definitely makes a difference.)
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 12:00 PM on November 5, 2008


I couldn't believe the speech - it was almost too emotional (at least on the audience)- and grand, but he was cool as a cucumber.

Beta-blackers.
posted by gman at 12:00 PM on November 5, 2008


I think the world owes two people more fruit baskets than they could possibly handle.

First, Tina Fey.


The Guardian agrees:

"...not until Tina Fey stepped into the ring and began eviscerating the hapless Palin did the tide truly begin to turn. Like Horatius at the bridge, like William Tell versus the Austrian invaders, like George Washington at Valley Forge, Ms Fey had come to the aid of her country at the moment her country needed her most. She serviced it with a smile."
posted by triggerfinger at 12:01 PM on November 5, 2008 [6 favorites]


From the Newsweek article:

One aide estimated that she spent "tens of thousands" more than the reported $150,000, and that $20,000 to $40,000 went to buy clothes for her husband. Some articles of clothing have apparently been lost. An angry aide characterized the shopping spree as "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast," and said the truth will eventually come out when the Republican Party audits its books.

That's something to look forward to.

A Palin aide said: "Governor Palin was not directing staffers to put anything on their personal credit cards, and anything that staffers put on their credit cards has been reimbursed, like an expense. Nasty and false accusations following a defeat say more about the person who made them than they do about Governor Palin."

Fair enough. However, truthful claims about Palin's behaviour following a defeat will say a lot about Governor Palin.

McCain himself rarely spoke to Palin during the campaign, and aides kept him in the dark about the details of her spending on clothes because they were sure he would be offended.

This speaks volumes about the McCain/Palin campaign.

Palin asked to speak along with McCain at his Arizona concession speech Tuesday night, but campaign strategist Steve Schmidt vetoed the request.

So does this.

On the Sunday night before the last debate, McCain's core group of advisers—Steve Schmidt, Rick Davis, adman Fred Davis, strategist Greg Strimple, pollster Bill McInturff and strategy director Sarah Simmons—met to decide whether to tell McCain that the race was effectively over, that he no longer had a chance to win. The consensus in the room was no, not yet, not while he still had "a pulse."

Did they really think he couldn't see this for himself? McCain may be volatile and unprincipled, but he doesn't strike me as being stupid.

The Republican had set firm boundaries: no Jeremiah Wright; no attacking Michelle Obama; no attacking Obama for not serving in the military. McCain balked at an ad using images of children that suggested that Obama might not protect them from terrorism.

Hmm. Was this because of genuine principles, or because they were afraid it would alienate the wrong people?

And before word even got to McCain, Schmidt and Salter scuttled a "celebrity" ad of Obama dancing with talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres (the sight of a black man dancing with a lesbian was deemed too provocative).

And too appealing. Like anyone's going to see being on good terms with cuddly Ellen DeGeneres as a reason not to vote for Obama.

On the night she officially lost the Democratic nomination, Hillary Clinton enjoyed a long and friendly phone conversation with McCain. Clinton was actually on better terms with McCain than she was with Obama. Clinton and McCain had downed shots together on Senate junkets; they regarded each other as grizzled veterans of the political wars and shared a certain disdain for Obama as flashy and callow.

He's charismatic, incredibly talented and hasn't sold his soul, if that's what they mean by "flashy and callow".

At the GOP convention in St. Paul, Palin was completely unfazed by the boys' club fraternity she had just joined. One night, Steve Schmidt and Mark Salter went to her hotel room to brief her. After a minute, Palin sailed into the room wearing nothing but a towel, with another on her wet hair. She told them to chat with her laconic husband, Todd. "I'll be just a minute," she said.

Palin thinks she's the cutest thing in shoe leather and that no one could possibly not want to see her half-naked. She'll still think that when she's ninety. Schmidt and Salter can count themselves fortunate she didn't strut around in front of them starkers.
posted by orange swan at 12:03 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Last June, Leonard Cohen played in Dublin to an adoring crowd. About half way through the set, he played Democracy is Coming to the USA. Hundreds of people spontaneously leapt out of their seats and started dancing in the aisles. I knew then something very special could really be happening. We are all so happy, for us and for you.

Also, I'm so pleased that I actually read every comment in this thread.
posted by tiny crocodile at 12:07 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh hells to the yes!

Obama may be the only politician I might be ok to take a bullet for. And the fact that that possibility even crosses my mind reminds me how effed up our country still is. Chalk one up for decency and the progressive movement.

Enjoy being pwned, rightwing nutters, but do please play fair for the next 4 years, mmmmkay??
posted by wowbobwow at 12:08 PM on November 5, 2008


Palin thinks she's the cutest thing in shoe leather and that no one could possibly not want to see her half-naked.

Ann Coulter and John Bolton feel the same way about themselves.
posted by gman at 12:10 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm amazed Obama did so well, considering only republicans were voting yesterday. I can only imagine how far ahead he'll be after the polls close tonight. Off to go vote now.





what? too soon?
posted by logicpunk at 12:11 PM on November 5, 2008 [6 favorites]


I just wanted to say that my husband and I saw Team America on our very first date, 3 weeks before the 2004 election.

So, AMERICA, FUCK YEAH! is very sentimental, and now it's very appropriate.
posted by desjardins at 12:11 PM on November 5, 2008


great pics: The Next President of the United States

I love number 13. Why? Because this negro eats at the goddam lunch counter and there ain't nothing you can do about it mother fuckers!
posted by Pollomacho at 12:13 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


what a great cartoon, nickyskye!

and good to see that steve bell is up to his expected high standard.

is anybody compiling the political cartoons from around the world? i'll throw in a couple from around here:

moir, of the sydney morning herald, went for something hopeful & momentous.

meanwhile, michael leunig of the melbourne age was his usual delightful self.
posted by UbuRoivas at 12:18 PM on November 5, 2008


I thought it was very amusing - as well as very noticeable - that she didn't get to say anything in Arizona, but just had to stand there with her hubby and smile. It was almost like McCain finally got his balls back and told her "No. I do the talking. You stand there and do not open your fucking mouth, you've already done enough damage."
posted by yhbc at 12:21 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Like Kwame Kilpatrick?

Exactly. The general concensus in Detroit right now is that Kwame got a raw deal and that he'll be welcomed back with open arms after he serves his "bogus" prison sentence. Just like Police Chief Hart still had the full support of Mayor Coleman Young after his conviction. Speaking of Coleman Young, he'd purchased a stash of gold Krugerrands from South Africa when Apartheid was still in effect - despite his statements of "I don't know nothing about no Goddamned Krugerrands" they were found among his personal effects after his death in 1997. Then there was that time when he vehemently denied paternity when Annivory Calvert declared that her son had been fathered by Mayor Young (he quietly recanted when DNA testing proved that he was, in fact, the child's dad). Despite these and many other scandals and political missteps, Young is still lionized in Detroit today, much like Obama seems to be already. "Oh my gosh, he's getting his kids a puppy! Squeeeee!" "Wow, what a guy, he bussed his own table at a fast food restaurant....**sigh** .... who better to be our next president?!"
posted by Oriole Adams at 12:21 PM on November 5, 2008


Just looked at my stocks and I could care less about the beating my portfolio's taking today. Obama is the new President. It's like he's cast a spell over me.
posted by gman at 12:28 PM on November 5, 2008


I'm late to the party, but still: Awesome. It's a good day to be an American.
posted by kryptondog at 12:36 PM on November 5, 2008




Palin asked to speak along with McCain at his Arizona concession speech Tuesday night

Heh. There were a couple moments during his concession speech where I had this itchy feeling she was going to grab the mike away from him. (Do VP candidates ever speak in these situations?)

I look forward to a long and happy lifetime of never seeing or thinking about her again. (No, I don't believe there's a chance in hell of a Palin 2012 or Palin 20anythingelse campaign. Her party realizes she was instrumental in eradicating what little chance they may have had of winning, even if she doesn't.)
posted by ook at 12:37 PM on November 5, 2008


Hip hip hooray USA! I haven't read the thread yet, so don't know if I'm repeating, but:

Thanks so much to all of you who donated your time and/ or money to make this happen. Much appreciated!

Love,
The rest of the world
posted by goo at 12:38 PM on November 5, 2008


Just heard a new expression on the basketball court.

It replaces "Ooooooo -- you just got punked!!"

And "Ooooooo -- you just got served!!"

.

.

Ya ready?

.

.

"Ooooooo -- you just got OBAMA-ED!!!"
posted by LordSludge at 12:40 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


It’s Not Over Yet: Bush Sneaks In Harmful Pollution Laws

That reminds me of Bush's first 100 days in office, when he tried to lower the standards for arsenic in drinking water.

Ah, memories.
posted by triggerfinger at 12:52 PM on November 5, 2008


I saw it twice already, but I can't remember where and I forgot to favorite it - but does anyone have a link to that cartoon of the 43 white presidents and one black one, captioned "November 4, 2008"?
posted by yhbc at 12:53 PM on November 5, 2008




I saw it twice already, but I can't remember where and I forgot to favorite it - but does anyone have a link to that cartoon of the 43 white presidents and one black one, captioned "November 4, 2008"?

Patrick Moberg - November 4th, 2008
posted by cashman at 12:58 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


whew
posted by klangklangston at 12:58 PM on November 5, 2008


Despite these and many other scandals and political missteps, Young is still lionized in Detroit today, much like Obama seems to be already. "Oh my gosh, he's getting his kids a puppy! Squeeeee!" "Wow, what a guy, he bussed his own table at a fast food restaurant....**sigh** .... who better to be our next president?!"

Well, that's not really a parallel case. We're not ignoring Obama's flaws in order to lionize him for superficial reasons; we're exulting because he is such a promising president-elect on so many levels that the his abundant superficial attributes (lthat the unfailing respect he shows everyone even extends to waitresses; his being remarkably photogenic; his promise to get a First Puppy; and the fact that his family is the most beautiful Presidential family since JFKs, etc.) is just gravy on our prime roast beef.
posted by orange swan at 12:58 PM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Thank you, cashman!
posted by yhbc at 1:01 PM on November 5, 2008


Bush Sneaks In Harmful Pollution Laws

President Obama: A Great New Hope For Science


Officials: Obama Considering Robert Kennedy For Top Environmental Post.
posted by ericb at 1:04 PM on November 5, 2008


NYT editorial:
His triumph was decisive and sweeping, because he saw what is wrong with this country: the utter failure of government to protect its citizens. He offered a government that does not try to solve every problem but will do those things beyond the power of individual citizens: to regulate the economy fairly, keep the air clean and the food safe, ensure that the sick have access to health care, and educate children to compete in a globalized world.
posted by snofoam at 1:05 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]




I so hope this is the much needed positive something the world has been waiting for!
The only way is up "all y'all"'. w000t!
In the meantime: Fokke & Sukke disagree; 'why does it always have to be an American" (Dutch cartoon)

posted by borq at 1:06 PM on November 5, 2008


A few years ago I raised a small amount of money for the NAACP, and they put me on their mailing list. It has become one of my favorite mailing lists to be on, as I repeatedly learn about initatives and news stories I'd never otherwise be hearing of. During the campaign I was heartened by their voter-registration efforts, their simple direct encouragement to tough out long lines (and cynicism) and be sure to vote, and their many elections-protection legal actions. Today, they sent this wonderful email.
Dear [Miko],

Yesterday was a glorious day.

Yesterday, 99 years of struggle by the members and supporters of the NAACP came to a head in a single glorious moment when the electorate surged and broke the color line that has guarded the White House since the day it was built… by slaves.

Yesterday children with foreign-sounding names learned that they too can be President of the United States, and the electoral aspiration of almost an entire generation of young American voters was realized.

On this historic day, we congratulate the President-Elect, and we honor the memory of freedom fighters like Dr. Martin Luther King, Ida B. Wells, Medgar Evers, Rosa Parks, and so many others who gave their lives so that America might truly become the land of opportunity for all people. Their sacrifice made this day possible.

Full electoral participation has always been a driving goal of the NAACP, and NAACP leaders around the country rose to the challenge.

In North Carolina, thanks to the work of committed NAACPers, voters were spared intimidating specters like the casket bearing a candidate's name that someone placed in front of a polling place in Craven County a few days earlier…

In Mississippi and Maine, the fieldwork of NAACP leaders meant that the number of voters surged even though they received relatively little attention from national campaigns…

In places like Florida and Ohio, thanks to NAACPers who pushed for voting reforms after the debacles of 2000 and 2004, the election ran much more smoothly…

In Alabama and Georgia, NAACP leaders led the charge to restore voting rights to thousands of former felons…

And in states like Indiana and Pennsylvania, NAACP lawsuits to protect voters paid off big time.

Because of the work of committed NAACP supporters like you, across the country we saw precincts with 95% voter registration rates, volunteers processed tens of thousands of calls to the 866-OUR-VOTE Election Protection hotline, and get out the vote efforts across the country targeted every single eligible voter.

Yes, yesterday was great day. But, it's only a glimmer of how bright our future can be when we work together.

Sincerely,


Benjamin Jealous
President & CEO
posted by Miko at 1:08 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


So can Palin please sod off back to Alaska so we never have to see her again? Because the idea of her being the poster child for any political party is just sickening.

President Barack Hussein Obama, fuck yeah!
posted by Talanvor at 1:10 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I wonder if Obama will accept donations of dogs? Mine crapped on the floor this morning; I bet he'd listen to the President.
posted by desjardins at 1:12 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Patrick Moberg - November 4th, 2008

ummm... why isn't the 42nd dude black as well?
posted by gman at 1:12 PM on November 5, 2008


Clinton and McCain had downed shots together on Senate junkets; they regarded each other as grizzled veterans of the political wars and shared a certain disdain for Obama as flashy and callow.

Everyone hates the new kid at the office who shows the old-timers up by getting the work done better, faster, and more cheerfully than the long-timers.

As much of a stink that was made during the primary about Hillary's being "ready on day one", we dodged a huge bullet by her not winning or gaming the nomination. Hillary a sharp and pragmatic pol, and she may have gotten a couple of things done, but she has no vision at all for the country. I can easily see her getting bogged down in bailout and Iraq type issues, and not doing a whole helluva lot differently than Bush did, and what McCain would do. Just in one example, if it's the right thing to do, Obama will reverse himself on a position and own up to it, but he'll have a good reason for doing so that's philosophically consistent, and he'll be able to communicate it in a direct way. Contrast this with both Clinton and McCain's pigheadedness on the war, never owning up to ever having had a different position in the past and sticking to a we-have-always-been-at-war-with-Eurasia communication strategy.

I think Obama has a clear vision for the country, but is a deeply pragmatic and cautious man. He does not start any project he doesn't know how to finish. I can easily see him telling Wall Street to go screw itself, pull out of Iraq precipitously if either (or both) are the best course of action to improve the long term health of the country.

Obama's got a clear-headedness and a courage that we don't often see in American politicians. There's something very Rooseveltian about him. Upthread the word was Reaganesque, but that's not right. Reagan oversimplified issues and eliminated nuance to make them easier to explain. Obama captures the nuance, and delivers the explanation in a clear way if you're willing to learn a little bit about the issue.

As for Emmanuel, whatever you think about his personal positions, he's the right choice for boss. He's a smart, tough, sharp-elbowed guy with a clear communications style, and a great choice to execute a program.
posted by psmealey at 1:25 PM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


Obama, in the box robot costume (possibly powered by hope)

Obama, almost in buddy Jesus pose

Obama the celebrity

My president can kick your president/ prime minister/ anointed-by-God(s)/ shaman's ass (or, his impression of the hang in there cat)

(First two from The Boston Globe, second two from Callie Shell)

And just a bit more shine on Obama - he was a make-a-wish dream come true, and then some. The story is better than that, I ran out of good, non cheezy words.
posted by filthy light thief at 1:25 PM on November 5, 2008


He's already chosen this douchebag as his chief of staff. A right wing democrat, Zionist militant, Freddie Mac board member who is completely bought-and-paid-for by the Daley Machine, Israel and Corporate America.

Obama has just chosen someone to organize his White House who has been part and parcel of the economic crisis and most likely has his sights set on Iran.


COS doesn't make policy; they implement it. It's not like Obama is the sort of guy to sleep late and take naps and let his COS run the White House. I'm not a fan of Emanuel, but he'll be doing Obama's bidding, after all is said and done.

If this is not a broken Obama promise already, I really don't what is.

Please point out when Obama said "I promise not to hire Rahm Emanuel."
posted by oneirodynia at 1:25 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


ummm... why isn't the 42nd dude black as well?

Let Dick Gregory school you.
posted by cashman at 1:27 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


counties where McCain did outperformed bush.

I'm not a big fan of Rahmbo getting the COS job. He was responsible for a lot of the candidate recruiting in '06 which got us stuck with the "blue dog" corporatists. On the other hand, TPM is saying that this is a sign that he'll be more partisan and pro-democrat rather then that bipartisan nonsense.
posted by delmoi at 1:28 PM on November 5, 2008


You know, I just thought to myself that this is almost uncharted territory for Mefi. This little corner of the internet has spent nearly its entire existence under W. Damn.
posted by Neilopolis at 1:32 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Harper for Obama

Sorry, gman, but the way the exchange rate is going, I think you'd need to change that to "three Trudeaus and Vancouver."
posted by Ghidorah at 1:37 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


!
posted by fourcheesemac at 1:38 PM on November 5, 2008


Oriole Adams, comparing Obama to Kwame Kilpatrick and Marion Barry.

Stay classy.
posted by delmoi at 1:41 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


(First two from The Boston Globe, second two from Callie Shell)

If the links to the individual pictures for Callie Shell are broken for you, go to Callie Shell and you can look at them all. They are a sight to behold. Worth it, definitely.
posted by Mental Wimp at 1:56 PM on November 5, 2008


Delmoi, there was a time when folks had the same passion and unblinkered optimism for Kwame and Marion. I'm not saying Barack Obama will ever follow in their footsteps; I'm saying that if he did, he still would be lauded as a saint, much as everyone here on the blue is doing today.
posted by Oriole Adams at 2:05 PM on November 5, 2008


So many children have know no other president but Bush (I say this as a old teacher who has sen many presidents come and go...). Two more comments before the thousandth one: I challenge you to read them all (well, I'd choose a good book myself. That's why I'm challenging one of you)

I hope Obama is not as imperialistic as our past presidents.
posted by kozad at 2:11 PM on November 5, 2008


I think the Rahm choice may be very savvy indeed. If he's to avoid the Carter fate, Obama needs the party's Washington power structure very firmly in his corner. CoS is a terrific choice because it's a position of sufficient power and authority that it's likely to be accepted, yet an absolutely subordinate one with no political clout independent of the President. If anything it subordinates Rahm's own clout and connections to directly to the WH. And it's one hell of a reassurance to those who tried to use threats to Israel against Obama, even as it commits Obama to absolutely nothing.

Also, there's a well-known expression involving the words "tent" and "pissing"...

Meanwhile:

folks had the same passion and unblinkered optimism for Kwame and Marion

Uh huh. You know who ELSE folks had passion and unblinkered optimism for?

I'm saying that if he did, he still would be lauded as a saint

Speak for yourself.
posted by George_Spiggott at 2:12 PM on November 5, 2008


he still would be lauded as a saint, much as everyone here on the blue is doing today

Eh, phooey. If you can't stop to consider and recognize a truly significant and historical event when it happens, then you're beyond cynical.

Obama is no saint, and he's nowhere near as liberal as the media has been portraying him in the past two months, but he does seem to the have right personal qualities and abilities to at least have the potential to be an effective president. That's about as much as anyone can ask for. When I stopped to ask McCain (and HRC) supporters why their candidate would be any better suited to the job than Obama, I never got a direct answer. The response always seemed to be vague and having something to do with "earning" it rather than having the actual skills or temperament to be good at it.
posted by psmealey at 2:14 PM on November 5, 2008


there was a time when folks had the same passion and unblinkered optimism for Kwame and Marion. I'm not saying Barack Obama will ever follow in their footsteps; I'm saying that if he did, he still would be lauded as a saint, much as everyone here on the blue is doing

Well, that is hard to argue with. And by hard, I mean impossible, since you're arbitrarily inventing a situation and then assigning blame for how people act in your fantasy world. But, if it makes you feel better, I'll agree with you - if Obama were guilty of massive fraud and corruption and everyone still lauded him as a saint, that would be really wrong.

Also in this fantasy world where Obama is a completely different person who gets the same amount of adulation as our universe's Obama, I can fly and shoot lasers out of my eyes, and it is awesome. You can't argue with that.
posted by heathkit at 2:14 PM on November 5, 2008 [17 favorites]


Gosh - true democracy in the USA, and Chinese Democracy from G'n'R - in the same year... wonder what the odds would have been?!

Congratulations USA - hope it works out as everyone wishes.

/will strongly miss comedy sketches about Prof. Liebstrom :(
posted by Chunder at 2:18 PM on November 5, 2008


I just shot Evil Obama with my eye lasers! *pew* *pew* Now with him gone, there's no one for your fictitious crowd to praise as a saint!

But the Obama in universe 62-A just killed a hooker, and they gave him an Oscar and made him King of Pretzels! That makes me so mad!
posted by heathkit at 2:22 PM on November 5, 2008 [8 favorites]


You want see some real change? I got some change for ya, right here.

Reactions to Barack Obama on Mefi:
January 2007 vs. November 2008


* * *

THEN:

Oh I'm so tired of this guy.
post by delmoi at 6:00 PM on January 16, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

But tonight, if everything works out the way it's looks like it will, we'll finally start putting our country back together again.

Not to get all sappy, but it's hard being a cynic in times like these.
post by delmoi at 10:39 AM on November 4 [1 favorite +] [!]

* * *

THEN:

All the same, I'm not comfortable backing him 100%, because he's never been in a tight spot where he had to make hard decisions. That's when character gets revealed, and as far as I can see, he's never really been tested.

Who knows whose side he'll end up on when the shit hits the fan?
post by empath at 6:28 PM on January 16, 2007 [1 favorite +] [!]

NOW:

There went the waterworks. I may need to turn the tv off and compose myself.

We really did it. I can't believe it.
post by empath at 10:09 PM on November 4 [4 favorites +] [!]

* * *

THEN:

Just remember: It Can't Happen Here.

Obama on the job: A brief overview of highly questionable voting decisions.
post by Blazecock Pileon at 7:01 PM on January 16, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

We did it! Congratulations to everyone who played a part in this momentous event in history. We are now back on the road to making a fresh start, to fixing our country.
post by Blazecock Pileon at 10:06 PM on November 4 [1 favorite +] [!]

* * *

THEN:

I look forward to learning more. And I hope he proves to be the man that so many want him to be.
post by stavrosthewonderchicken at 7:04 PM on January 16, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

For the first time in 30 years, at least for now, I'm hopeful. If any nation in the world, any President, can truly make a historic change to reverse the course of our civilization, it is America, and it may just be this new president of yours. Who knows if our man will be able to shoulder the burden of the hopes of so many that he has willingly assumed. Bless him for trying, whether he succeeds or not.

Thank you, Americans, for doing the right thing, finally, and thanks for fanning that dream of the possibility of a better world alight again in this tired ol' heart of mine.
post by stavrosthewonderchicken at 11:05 PM on November 4 [62 favorites +] [!]

* * *

THEN:

Since Obama is just a couple of years out of the Illinois Legislature, I just wish he would be humble and brave enough to say, "Thanks, but I don't have enough experience to be President yet," instead of being just like all the other vile, power-hungry pieces of shit who have to grab their chance the first time it presents itself.
post by jayder at 8:00 PM on January 16, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

This is wonderful. An amazing moment. Obama's election to the presidency gives me a new respect for my country.
post by jayder at 10:26 PM on November 4 [+] [!]

* * *

THEN:

I dunno about President, but I'd certainly vote for Obama for America's Next Top Political Dreamboat. He could go around on floats and wave and look pretty, bringing joy to the hearts of millions.

Or, y'know, run for President and do sort of the same thing, but sell his soul and lose a lot of money in the process.
post by grapefruitmoon at 10:21 PM on January 16, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

I am totally, totally exhausted and I realize that part of what I feel right now, other than pride and joy, is RELIEF. Man, this election cycle was rough on the soul, but I could start crying all over again. As one of the fathers in my Schmoop's music class said: he's what the world needs now.

My first election I participated in was 2000, where I became totally disenfranchised with "the system." Now I see that we CAN and we WILL totally ROCK THE SYSTEM. Power to the people! For the first time in my adult life I *get* what it means to be an American, and it's an awesome, awesome thing. I could hug us. Every last one of us.
post by grapefruitmoon at 5:32 AM on November 5 [+] [!]

* * *

THEN:

I don't think Obama will win the nomination, much less survive past Nevada.

He's not fundamentalist enough for the lockstep Dobsonites, but at the same time he is religious, which makes the Bizzaro Dobsonites -- the ones on the left who are demagogues all after political purity -- foam at the mouth.

That means he'll do well with your mainline churchgoers who are generally center to center-left, the Jim Wallis evangelical left, people who get all dreamy about his African American preacher cadences... and that's it. People like amberglow won't hold their noses to vote for him because he doesn't represent their version of America, just as some of my fundie friends will likewise just write him off as a smooth-talking devil.

Which is sad, you know? Because what it says is that a moderate can't win anymore. You either have to be a Christmas-and-Easter Catholic who would vote for abortion-on-demand kiosks installed in every indie coffeehouse in America, or an Opus Dei sort who would vote to hang abortion doctors and send their families to Gitmo. Never mind that the opinion polls find that most Americans, while being pro-life, wouldn't mind seeing some common sense restrictions on it. But OMG, restrictions are a stalking horse for an OUTRIGHT BAN! But then, loosing restrictions on the Pill is a stalking horse for STARBUCKS ABORTION KIOSKS WITH FREE FRAPPUCINO COUPON AFTERWARDS!

Obama talks of finding common ground with the religious center/right, and all true believer liberals do in response is sharpen their machetes and dream of Rwanda, while the religious right power structure fights to keep their flock watching Fox News and voting for their new version of fascism.

I'm with itchylick's mom. We need to start again with this America idea.
post by dw at 3:35 PM on January 17, 2007 [+] [!]

NOW:

They'll call the election when the West Coast closes. It's over.

You have until 8pm PST, 11pm EST, 0400 GMT to procure champagne! GO GO GO!!!
post by dw at 8:42 PM on November 4 [+] [!]

* * *

I want to emphasize that this isn't meant as a call-out or a "ha-ha, you were so wrong" taunt. I just think it's fascinating how so many people have changed their estimation of the man so radically in such a short amount of time. Even ignoring the racial milestone, Obama's rise is a truly incredible political feat.
posted by Rhaomi at 2:27 PM on November 5, 2008 [62 favorites]


Sorry, gman, but the way the exchange rate is going, I think you'd need to change that to "three Trudeaus and Vancouver."

How bout Alberta? But we'll expect less hassle with transfer payments.
posted by gman at 2:31 PM on November 5, 2008


I think the world owes two three people more fruit baskets than they could possibly handle.

First, Tina Fey.

Second, Shepard Fairey


Third: Katie Couric. It was her interview that exposed Palin's ignorance and lack-of-fitness for the job. That interview and Tina Fey & Rachel Dratch's spoof of it defined Palin's image as an airhead.
posted by ericb at 2:39 PM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


My town voted in favor of Obama by a count of 2008-1889 a close victory, but 2008 votes for him, in 2008, coincidence or awesomeness?

lilkeith, in all fairness, the 1889 is also significant: McCain could have beaten Grover Cleveland.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 12:17 PM on November 5 [1 favorite +] [!]


McCain was spanked by Grover Cleveland on two non-consecutive occasions.
posted by DiscourseMarker at 2:39 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I just think it's fascinating how so many people have changed their estimation of the man so radically in such a short amount of time. Even ignoring the racial milestone, Obama's rise is a truly incredible political feat.
posted by Rhaomi at 5:27 PM on November 5


That's nothing. My posting history here begins with me being a Bush supporter with one foot out the door, to wanting Richardson to win the Dem primaries and Romney to the Republican primaries, to thinking that Obama didn't have the experience for the job and defending Hillary supporters who felt the historic rise of their candidate was being ignored. And then I voted for him.
posted by Pastabagel at 2:40 PM on November 5, 2008 [10 favorites]


At the end of the following day, my pleasure is tempered by two realizations: First, in local and state elections (Lincoln Nebraska) a lot of the races didn't go the way I was hoping. Second, for the next 4 years, I'll be unable to say about the President: "Don't blame me, I voted for the other guy". I've gotten used to that cop-out these last 8 years.
posted by jepler at 2:43 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


In other news, the Minnesota Senate race is down to razor-thin margins.

Coleman: 1,211,643
Franken: 1,211,167

467-vote difference.

Source
posted by Rhaomi at 2:43 PM on November 5, 2008


Le Monde's open statement of solidarity and international love applies here: Nous sommes tous américains. It's hard to describe but there is a palpable feeling of love and respect for America today, in Australia yes, but all across the world even more so, and for once a feeling of hope rather than despair.

The world no longer feels gloomy, and the challenges we face no longer insurmountable. To every American that not only chose to exercise their democratic privilege at all, but also chose to invest their share of the nation's destiny on Obama you have the worlds gratitude, and even more the oxford blue seal of 'good show old chap.'

Even reading over the transcript of Obama's victory speech gives me chills—yes we can—and his evident flair as a speaker is welcome after the black rhetorical abyss of the last few years. Jed Bartlett would be proud.
posted by oxford blue at 2:43 PM on November 5, 2008


I suspect Rhaomi's comment is going to get most of the attention going forward, but I just wanted to pull this beauty (intentionally out of context) out of George_Spiggott's comment.

CoS is a terrific choice

Given what that abbreviation usually means on this site, I'm 100% sure those five words have never previously sat next to each other on MetaFilter.
posted by SpiffyRob at 2:44 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I just keep coming back to this emotion, so it's time I expressed it:

To my fellow Americans, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you...
posted by Mental Wimp at 2:45 PM on November 5, 2008


I don’t know about punk’d = Obamaed.
Punk’d is sort of an immediate gotcha sorta thing.

Obama’d is more of a methodical strategic campaign of constant skillful pressure applied across a broad and diverse spectrum while exploiting and allowing an opponant to reveal their weaknesses despite being underestimated yourself and indomidably exerting one’s will in an inevitable and masterful win.

“A right wing democrat, Zionist militant, Freddie Mac board member who is completely bought-and-paid-for by the Daley Machine, Israel and Corporate America.”

The fourth-ranking Democrat in the House you mean?
The Zionist that got Yitzak Rabin and Arafat to shake hands?
Clinton’s senior advisor for policy and strategy for 6 years during one of the strongest periods of economic growth in history, that guy?

Yeah, that sure came out of left field, what the hell could Obama be thinking?
*WTF? face*

And why criticize the Daley machine? You from around here? Does it affect you? He bulldoze any of your airports? Ok.
Maybe he’s a bastard, but he’s *our* bastard.
(Well, ok, no ‘maybes’ about it really)

Y’know, of course Obama isn’t going to do things everyone likes. That’s why they call it ‘compromise’ and ‘reconciliation.’ It doesn’t come without sacrifice.
The man said - even if he didn’t get your vote, he will hear your voice.

Hell, I’d rather take the hit and suffer through some policy changes I don’t like if I can get a president who isn’t a hypocrite and an outright liar.

Say what you will about this choice, at least it’s predictable. (Hell, I think the guy’s too far left)

But Bush - even if you supported some things he did - was like living in a dark room full of sharp cans and old tires and handguns with a drunken monkey and random bursts of flame. You had no rational basis to predicate any future action.

And McCain was going to continue that. I mean - Palin?
*monkey SCREEEEEEAM!* Oh god! Is he loose? Does he have the gun? Did I step on a can? What the hell is going on?
The whole campaign was like that. I liked the old John McCain. Who the hell was that guy?


Y’know...I think Hunter Thompson let the shitheads get to him. He checked out too early.
He liked RFK. He liked McGovern
He didn’t get to see (physically) the stomping this neighborhood guy delivered to these fear mongering ingrate hacks.

We were always part of history. It was always our world. They only win if you give up.
This is what happens when you don’t.
posted by Smedleyman at 2:46 PM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


Newsweek has some interesting post-campaign leaks.

First Pailn:
NEWSWEEK has also learned that Palin's shopping spree at high-end department stores was more extensive than previously reported...Palin also used low-level staffers to buy some of the clothes on their credit cards. The McCain campaign found out last week when the aides sought reimbursement. One aide estimated that she spent "tens of thousands" more than the reported $150,000, and that $20,000 to $40,000 went to buy clothes for her husband. Some articles of clothing have apparently been lost. An angry aide characterized the shopping spree as "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast," and said the truth will eventually come out when the Republican Party audits its books.
Also this bit about Obama:
"I don't consider this to be a good format for me, which makes me more cautious. I often find myself trapped by the questions and thinking to myself, 'You know, this is a stupid question, but let me … answer it.' So when Brian Williams is asking me about what's a personal thing that you've done [that's green], and I say, you know, 'Well, I planted a bunch of trees.' And he says, 'I'm talking about personal.' What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f---ing changed light bulbs in my house. It's because of something collective'."
posted by delmoi at 2:46 PM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


My network has been out most of the day, but I tell ya...out there in the real world...people were just so freaking happy. I saw people at Home Depot giving each other high fives in the parking lot when they saw each other's Obama stickers. The girl who checked me out with all my potting soil and new pots said "A new day in America is a darn fine time to start some new plants!".

I still can't believe Dallas county went for Barack. Dallas for goodness sake. Go team!
posted by dejah420 at 2:49 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Third: Katie Couric. It was her interview that exposed Palin's ignorance and lack-of-fitness for the job. That interview and Tina Fey & Rachel Dratch's spoof of it defined Palin's image as an airhead.

Dude, that was Amy Poheler, same one who did the "Palin Rap" about shooting moose right in front of her.

The MN Senate race will be re-counted for sure, and provisional ballots will come into play. Of course, Coleman says the race is too important to recount.
posted by delmoi at 2:50 PM on November 5, 2008


From my neighborhood last night:

DON'T STOP BELIEVING!
posted by tkchrist at 2:50 PM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


The general concensus in Detroit right now is that Kwame got a raw deal and that he'll be welcomed back with open arms after he serves his "bogus" prison sentence.

Oriole Adams, please keep your racist bull shit in Birmingham. You don't know what the fuck you are talking about.

Have you ever even crossed 8 Mile?
posted by QIbHom at 2:51 PM on November 5, 2008


there is a palpable feeling of love and respect for America today...

Check out this slideshow of folks around the world reacting to Obama's historic win.
posted by ericb at 2:51 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I tried hitting the [+] button beside all the NOW:'s and the [!] button beside all the THEN:'s in Rhaomi's comment...
posted by gman at 2:55 PM on November 5, 2008


My favorite moment in the jubilation on the streets last night was when a car, jam packed with young ecstatic black girls all hanging out the windows and sun roof, driving down the street and joyfully yelling:

"Thank you white people!"

Occasionally running up and hugging and kissing people. Then leaping back into the windows of their car. God that made me so happy.

God damn it, young people. It really was your night.
posted by tkchrist at 2:57 PM on November 5, 2008 [8 favorites]


Rhaomi, lemme give you some ammunition for the future... *ahem*...

Surely this Obama fella will never be able to win reelection in 2012. I'd love to be proven wrong, but I just don't see it happening.
posted by yeti at 2:58 PM on November 5, 2008


Rhaomi - the flip-flop is so 2004.
posted by gman at 3:08 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Mahalo.
posted by elfgirl at 3:11 PM on November 5, 2008


Oriole Adams, please keep your racist bull shit in Birmingham. You don't know what the fuck you are talking about.

Have you ever even crossed 8 Mile?

Born and raised in Detroit, thank you very much, lived near Harper and Morang area until 1999.
posted by Oriole Adams at 3:17 PM on November 5, 2008


I think the world owes two three people more fruit baskets than they could possibly handle.

First, Tina Fey.

Second, Shepard Fairey

Third: Katie Couric.


Is there room for David Letterman in there to get a cookie bouquet? McCain's supposedly suspending his campaign during the first phase of the financial crisis really brought out the curmudgeon in Letterman. To have cancelled an appearance on the Late Show with the excuse of rushing back to D.C. didn't make McCain look very serious (or classy) after Letterman showed him instead about to be interviewed by Katie Couric in her New York newsroom.

(Here's the Youtube link - things heat up around 6:05.)
posted by Doktor Zed at 3:22 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I've been thinking all day of my American friends and how relieved and overwhelmed they must be feeling. On Monday I replied to a fearing-the-worst email from my father: "For once I'm putting my cynicism on hold and believing that the polls will be right this time. If they're not we'll have four more years to be miserable, so we might as well enjoy this brief window of hope." How sweet that the window is so much bigger than that.
posted by rory at 3:29 PM on November 5, 2008


I'm a patriot. I love this country. It's constitution, it's history and it's possibilities. I've lived in two houses in the past few years, and have wanted to hang a gorgeous red, white & blue flag off the porch, but I haven't. I think many of you know why, it's because the conservative movement has been so persistent in connecting THEIR cause with OUR flag, that to hang a flag in my yard seemed to be an expression of solidarity with a side or our political movement that I often detest.

Specifically, I remember standing in line waiting for a bus on Sept 13, 2001. We were lined up in makeshift areas at the Pentagon City mall since the bus station at the pentagon was closed down. Everyone was subdued and frightened and on edge. Down the road came a mud-spattered pickup, obviously from "real Virginia", and a giant Marine flag and a US flag was hanging off the back. In an instant, I could see that this awful event was going to be used to whip up a jingoistic fervor that could take my country down a terrifying path. And it's been worse than I imagined.

I'm getting a flag and hanging it out on Jan 20.
posted by saffry at 3:38 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


I'm happily taken aback by the reactions of some of the folks on Fox News and Condoleezza Rice regarding the election. There must have been some interesting crossover voters out there.
posted by mr.grum at 3:57 PM on November 5, 2008


Well, he is Amerca's Next Top Political Dreamboat.

So sue me that I didn't believe you could run for president AND keep your soul. No one had done it before!
posted by grapefruitmoon at 3:58 PM on November 5, 2008


I'm extremely relieved. Congratulations!
posted by monocot at 4:11 PM on November 5, 2008


Here in Arkansas, anti-gay bigotry was sufficient to pass a law prohibiting all "unmarried" couples from fostering or adopting kids.

I'm a gay rights support and I am in a common-law relationship.

Yet I can support what Arkansas did. I believe that in the US, and probably particularly in Arkansas, marriage laws and rights provide far more protection for children than would otherwise be the case.

Until the laws change such that children of common-law couples are as protected as are the children of married couples, it's probably best that common-law couples not be allowed to adopt or foster.
posted by five fresh fish at 4:13 PM on November 5, 2008


I want to emphasize that this isn't meant as a call-out or a "ha-ha, you were so wrong" taunt. I just think it's fascinating how so many people have changed their estimation of the man so radically in such a short amount of time. Even ignoring the racial milestone, Obama's rise is a truly incredible political feat.

Heh. You got me.

I didn't think he could do it back then, and I was still skeptical of him clear into primary season. I don't think I decided on him until maybe two weeks before the Washington caucus (Feb 9). Before then, I was between Edwards and Richardson, hoping I'd get an internationalist with centrist economic policies that would listen to his advisors and make his own decisions. I was not at all for Hillary, not that I wouldn't vote for her, but she was too... Clinton.

My wife was fully in the tank for Obama sometime in December. So, night of New Hampshire, she's ripping her hair out and rending her garments over Hillary's win. We got into a huge fight. I remember yelling at her that it was just NEW HAMPSHIRE and WE'RE A LONG WAY FROM DONE and CALM THE HELL DOWN and IT'S JUST AN ELECTION.

And then came that speech in Nashua. And yes, it was corny, and the will.i.am video just made it cornier. But still, it just stunned me, because, well, he nailed me:
We have been told we cannot do this by a chorus of cynics who will only grow louder and more dissonant in the weeks to come. We've been asked to pause for a reality check. We've been warned against offering the people of this nation false hope.

But in the unlikely story that is America, there has never been anything false about hope. For when we have faced down impossible odds; when we've been told that we're not ready, or that we shouldn't try, or that we can't, generations of Americans have responded with a simple creed that sums up the spirit of a people.

Yes we can.
I'm a Gen Xer. I was one of the cynics. And I think, for the first time in my life, I finally heard someone say, without a hint or tinge of irony, that hope was not a punchline.

I didn't immediately go behind Obama. I had to read his policies, hear his magnificent Martin Luther King Day speech, and watch as his incredible organization roared to life before I finally, about two weeks before the caucuses, decided to support him.

And on caucus day there I stood -- a caucus of 120, 8 times its normal size -- trying to hold order as old feminists and young college kids tore at each other while five other caucuses of equal size yelled and roared in that little gym, leaving me so hoarse I could barely make a sound for the rest of the day.

And I watched as his campaign fought tooth and nail with the Democratic establishment, wrestled with Jeremiah Wright, slipped, fell, got up again.

I spent the spring and summer in this endless back-and-forth with Metaman. In a way, Metaman's constant arguing not only cemented my support for Obama, he sharpened the reasons why I was supporting him and not Hillary. For that, I thank him.

I saw him take the stage in Mile High, thinking it was, indeed, a little too Nuremberg, and watched as he answered his critics who called him light on details, watched as he finally got angry, just a little, so as not to scare the whites.

Then came Palin. And then, well, I got angry, just a little. I never have felt the animus towards McCain that many Democrats have, but then, I'm not as much a Democrat as a Republican whose party abandoned me. So, day after her slovenly, roiling speech, my wedding anniversary, I gave Obama $1000 and told my wife she wasn't getting anything because I gave it to the campaign. She was very happy.

And then I watched the hate get worse, and this man, this mutt of a kid, take every bit of it in stride. He shrugged off the anger and fear of the right, talking to them like they were people he expected better things from than this.

Colin Powell. He sat there, looked at Brokaw, and gave the endorsement I wanted to give. He's a Muslim? So what? Give me a lieutenant with a steady hand that will lead his men any day over a general whose planning is erratic and can only be a liability to the men he commands. We need transformation.

My brother in law, a good ol' boy, who doesn't have the greatest feelings towards African-Americans, decided to vote for Obama. His son is deploying to Afghanistan, and he'd rather have Obama be his son's commander in chief.

Last weekend, my brother called. Okie kid like me, from the same staunchly Republican family, deeply conservative, but voting for Obama. And mom laid into him for daring to vote for "that one." He was a Muslim. He was a Marxist. He would destroy small business. How dare my brother betray us. He said he took it in stride, because he thought Obama was the steady hand, the transformer.

So, yesterday, as Ohio was called and Obama's win was the equivalent of a couple kneeldowns away from a Gatorade shower, I thought about why I went with him. No, I don't agree with all his policies. His excise tax on oil company profits is misguided. His health care plan is a little murky. And the messianic qualities do rub me the wrong way at times. But... well, back to what I said in January 2007:

We need to start again with this America idea.

What I watched Obama's campaign do this last year was just that -- start again with this America idea. They hacked a cynical political system and our own willingness to withdraw into groups of people Just Like Us and told us that it wasn't working. We had to think big. Dream big. Sacrifice. Build. Return to The Union And The Constitution Forever. Be Americans again, wide-eyed, creative skeptics of conventional wisdom with that ol' swagger. The people who brought the world the Bill of Rights, public schools, the Marshall Plan, the bread slicer, and Crystal Pepsi. The people who bailed Europe's asses out of two wars, invented the Internet, put a man on the moon, wrote damn fine novels like To Kill A Mockingbird, and make blue jeans look good.

You know. Americans. The people the world loves to hate, not because we're the scared, mopey, marital fearmongers of the last eight years, but because, when faced with a challenge, we smile our big shit-eating grins like the naifs we are and say, "YES WE CAN."

And that half-Kenyan, half-whitebread dude who makes Oxford shirts look damn sexy, with the hot wife and the adorable kids? He's America. He's what we are, mutts that fought and worked and sacrificed our way to the top. And together, hopefully, we're going to drag this whole damn world out of this economic shithole, because that's what we do. We're Americans. And we're back, bitches.
posted by dw at 4:17 PM on November 5, 2008 [64 favorites]


I ultimately doubt that Obama will actually change America.

That is absolutely true. It's going to take everyone's effort to change America.

Don't think for a moment that because you voted for Obama, you need not do anything else. Saving America requires a team effort.
posted by five fresh fish at 4:20 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]




Don't think for a moment that because you voted for Obama, you need not do anything else. Saving America requires a team effort.

What does that mean, exactly? I'm starting to wish I'd done more than just donate and vote this time. If I could do it again, I'd volunteer, phonebank, etc. What should we be doing now?
posted by heathkit at 4:23 PM on November 5, 2008


dw, I favorited your post above, and I don't want to cause a derail, but I think the ghosts of millions of dead Russians (civilians and soldiers) and Nazi Germany rocket scientist Werhner von Braun would like to speak to you about this The people who bailed Europe's asses out of two wars and this put a man on the moon, respectively.
posted by lord_wolf at 4:29 PM on November 5, 2008 [6 favorites]


It's nice for you, but the world doesn't actually want or need your leadership America...
posted by A189Nut at 4:30 PM on November 5, 2008


> Katie Couric. It was her interview that exposed Palin's ignorance and lack-of-fitness for the job.

What I found striking -- and which probably helped weaken the Republicans' case for Palin -- was the post interview spin contending that the interview was a setup and that Couric was being too hard on her.

Most of America, and many Republican partisans who would otherwise be supporting McCain, took a look at the footage, considered the history of Katie Couric as a 'serious news anchor', and collectively responded, "Are you high?"
posted by ardgedee at 4:34 PM on November 5, 2008


dw, I favorited your post above, and I don't want to cause a derail, but I think the ghosts of millions of dead Russians (civilians and soldiers) and Nazi Germany rocket scientist Werhner von Braun would like to speak to you about this The people who bailed Europe's asses out of two wars and this put a man on the moon, respectively.

Oh, OK, fine. "Bailed Western Europe's asses out of two wars" and "spent a billion bucks just to put a man on the moon."

Come on, spare just a little bombast for the day? It's been a long, long time since any of us felt good about being Americans.

posted by dw at 4:40 PM on November 5, 2008


What should we be doing now?

I know what I'm going to be doing: working to understand, educate about and eliminate black and hispanic homophobia.

It sickens me beyond recognition that the amazing Obama GOTV campaign in California may just be largely responsible for the passage of Prop 8; the stats quoted today said that 70% of African Americans who voted in CA voted FOR Prop 8 -- to remove the civil rights of a specific group of American citizens.

I shall never, ever ever understand how a group of people (such as blacks or hispanics) who have been on the receiving end of bigotry, racism and hatred could turn around and practice prejudice against another group.
posted by CitizenD at 4:44 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


his evident flair as a speaker is welcome after the black rhetorical abyss of the last few years.

What on earth are you talking about?

If there's been a rhetorical abyss during recent years, I think it's clear by now that the fault didn't lie with the blacks.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:46 PM on November 5, 2008


Everybody Dance Now!
posted by bwg at 4:48 PM on November 5, 2008


The people the world loves to hate, not because we're the scared, mopey, marital fearmongers of the last eight years, but because, when faced with a challenge, we smile our big shit-eating grins like the naifs we are and say, "YES WE CAN."

Damn, I've never seen it demonstrated so succinctly why the America so easily arouses hate. Clue: It's not because you're just so damn awesome. Come on, that's like your mommy saying you're bullied because you're so smart and good-looking that everyone's just plain jealous.

Try realising that many American ideals are universal, and that you can take much of the world along with you, not battle in spite of it. Lose the complex. Stephen Fry's tweet hit the nail on the head:
The world so wants to love America and now they can again.
That's the message of this win. Not "We're back, bitches". For us, you never left.
posted by bonaldi at 4:50 PM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


I just think it's fascinating how so many people have changed their estimation of the man so radically in such a short amount of time.

I would just like to point out that I was 90% in the tank for him already. I was just being somewhat cautious, and I was also crossing my fingers that Al Gore would get in. Once it was clear Al Gore wasn't going to get in the race, I was 110% behind Obama. The first words out of my mouth after his 2004 DNC speech were: "He's going to be the first black president."
posted by empath at 4:59 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


I spent the spring and summer in this endless back-and-forth with Metaman. In a way, Metaman's constant arguing not only cemented my support for Obama, he sharpened the reasons why I was supporting him and not Hillary. For that, I thank him.

Remember back in March, when MetaMan was insisting that if Obama were to win the nomination, he was not only doomed in Ohio, Florida, and Pennsylvania, but quite likely to lose California too? Good times.
posted by EarBucket at 5:00 PM on November 5, 2008


Inauguration Day meetup? See MeTa.
posted by brain cloud at 5:04 PM on November 5, 2008


or need your leadership America...

Man. How I wish that were true. But it's just not true. Fact is for the next couple decades it will take American power, largess, and will to "lead" on critical issues. Like Global Warming. You simply are not gonna get shit done without us is a "leadership" role. Sorry. I wish it wasn't true. But it is. I'd LOVE it if the EU could actually provide the momentum and power necessary to execute meaningful changes on our large global problems. But they are not there yet. You have to have not only US cooperation but US leadership for these big problems. We got the everything you need. (And there is the matter of about 10,000 Nuclear warheads we got burning a hole in pockets).

And that's why a sea change in American domestic leadership was so crucial to the world. Eventually somebody will have the kind of pull and power we have... at least I HOPE so. I hope we don't just crash and burn and leave a world of weaker second-bests tearing at each others throats for our scraps. I hope there will emerge a real Super Power again. Hopefully that will be the EU.

But even with the economic melt-down there is nobody there quite yet.
posted by tkchrist at 5:04 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


"He later won the general election by defeating Freman Hendrix, the winner of the runoff. Kilpatrick's re-election made a lot of us in Michigan scratch our heads, but I couldn't say he was ever Teflon-slick and he was clearly facing a lot of criticism from his own constituents during his time in office."

He defeated Hendrix because Hendrix's kid got arrested like a week before the election, for beating up the kid's girlfriend if I recall correctly.

"Exactly. The general concensus in Detroit right now is that Kwame got a raw deal and that he'll be welcomed back with open arms after he serves his "bogus" prison sentence."

Bullshit. The general consensus in Detroit is that Kwame was a moron who got in through nepotism and deep corruption within Detroit party politics, and only managed to confirm everyone's fears. Kilpatrick's approval rating inside the city was 17% before he was removed (and just 2% in the state as a whole). Every major publication has come out against him, within and without the black community.

"there was a time when folks had the same passion and unblinkered optimism for Kwame and Marion. I'm not saying Barack Obama will ever follow in their footsteps; I'm saying that if he did, he still would be lauded as a saint, much as everyone here on the blue is doing today."

That's more prevaricating bullshit. Kwame was barely elected (like I said, had Hendrix's kid not gotten busted, Kilpatrick would have never served), and while I'm sure his momma loved him, very few people even within Detroit's black community had much love for him. His "Hip Hop Mayor" prancing around with a posse was obviously effective—it made you believe he was loved—but it was shallow support. Contrast that with Coleman Young's support, which came from a heavy and deep history of organizing against a white power structure, legitimizing him for far longer than he deserved due in part to a racist antagonism between Detroit and the white suburbs.

The more accurate, if still (in my opinion) wrong-headed, comparison would be of Obama and Dennis Archer, where Archer's faux-Clintonian "New Way" promised racial transcendence but fell embarrassingly short, selling out the city for a couple of casinos.

But Christ, obviously just because you live in Detroit doesn't mean you know the politics there.
posted by klangklangston at 5:04 PM on November 5, 2008


Here in Kyoto the coffee tastes exceptionally good this morning. A new fragrance to the flowers, a new gladness to the sunshine. I am so delighted to be able to reply that I'm American without appending a caveat and an apology.

"Sen. Lieberman, here's your new office. Try not to kick over the janitor's slop bucket as you make your way back to your desk."
posted by planetkyoto at 5:07 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


That's the message of this win. Not "We're back, bitches". For us, you never left.

Yep, and the bitches stuff gets pretty tiresome at the same time. There should be a way to enjoy a victory without having to resort to top dog domination "#1!! #1!! #1!!" nonsense. If we've learned anything from watching this race, it should be this.
posted by jessamyn at 5:09 PM on November 5, 2008 [9 favorites]


Fact is for the next couple decades it will take American power, largess, and will to "lead" on critical issues. Like Global Warming. You simply are not gonna get shit done without us is a "leadership" role. Sorry. I wish it wasn't true. But it is.

That makes a lot of sense, considering that the average American has an environmental footprint larger than entire African countries.

Leadership, in this sense, means "Stop buying so much goddamned useless shit, already!" You can start with the SUVs and ridiculous over-reliance on private transport.
posted by UbuRoivas at 5:14 PM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


You could sign & ratify Kyoto, too.

That would be a nice example of leading from behind.
posted by UbuRoivas at 5:15 PM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Y’know...I think Hunter Thompson let the shitheads get to him. He checked out too early.
He liked RFK. He liked McGovern
He didn’t get to see (physically) the stomping this neighborhood guy delivered to these fear mongering ingrate hacks.


Yeah, I think about Hunter a lot. He got me into politics as a teenager; after I read Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 I went to see nearly every Democratic primary contender speak when they came into town. My parents thought I had gone nuts.

This whole cycle would have been red meat for him. Slick Willy vs. the Junior Senator from Illinois. Cindy McCain's painkiller addiction. The moose blasting beauty queen from Wasilla. Zillions of young political activists sleeping on floors in strange cities in order to canvas in government housing projects and depressed rust belt towns. Rope-a-Dope as political metaphor... Man, I know he would be all over that last bit. I really wish he had held out a bit longer.
posted by oneirodynia at 5:16 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


That makes a lot of sense, considering that the average American has an environmental footprint larger than entire African countries.

Leadership, in this sense, means "Stop buying so much goddamned useless shit, already!" You can start with the SUVs and ridiculous over-reliance on private transport.


Yes. Exactly. Though I have a feeling that the economy is gonna take of that for us. But I was thinking more of the experience of having fifty years of globally executable power infra-structure and whole bunch very experienced people waiting to get shit done. Who, when they sit idle too long, tend to get purposed for stuff like invasions and occupations and blowing shit up.
posted by tkchrist at 5:18 PM on November 5, 2008


That's the message of this win. Not "We're back, bitches". For us, you never left.

I think I was a little too over the top with my "why I changed my mind about Obama" speech.

But, you know? I walked around town this morning, and for the first time in years, everyone looked... happy. Like they were proud of who they were. And I look at the videos of Seattleites, some of the most liberal and world-focused Americans, the sorts that make vomiting signs at the sound of "God Bless The USA," waving American flags and pogoing on Broadway....

We did leave. After 9/11, we retreated into our shells, hid from the world, shook our heads in apology when everyone talked about Dubya. I know a number of people who went to Europe affecting Vancouver accents or sewing Canadian patches on their packs just to avoid the scrutiny. And I think we hid from the world, liberal and conservative, because we're still a little scared that you're going to blow us up.

But last night, with a great flourish, I think we announced to the world that we want to lay aside the past and go back to being the goofy, friendly sorts of people the world loves to hate but can't stop loving. The Canadian flags are coming off, the American flags are going back on. That's what "We're back, bitches" means. We're here. We're asking for French fries in Paris. We're asking why there are no kangaroos in Austria. We're going to wear fanny packs and ask why the Mona Lisa isn't in the National Gallery and you will laugh at us. But we're just happy to be back -- and happy we didn't completely destroy the world the last eight years. And you know what? We love you too. And if you need a solid, you know we got your back.

So, friends? Promise no pointless wars the next four years. Can't promise beyond that, but hey, it's a start, right?
posted by dw at 5:25 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Merkley's pulled ahead in the Oregon Senate race.
posted by EarBucket at 5:27 PM on November 5, 2008


You could sign & ratify Kyoto, too.

Kyoto is useless, since China and India are exempted and allowed to pollute however much they want. Ratifying the treaty would finish off what's left of the US manufacturing industry and move it to polluting Chinese factories with the goods shipped on polluting Panamax container ships.

We have to start from scratch, unfortunately.
posted by dw at 5:30 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Jesus. Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent.
posted by EarBucket at 5:47 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


We did leave. After 9/11, we retreated into our shells, hid from the world, shook our heads in apology when everyone talked about Dubya.

If that were true, the world would not have been so concerned about this election.

No, the USA did not leave. It fucked over entire nations, it denied climate change and stymied all attempts at dealing with the problem, it destroyed the global economy, it turned on its friends and burned its bridges. The past eight years have been fucking hell on everyone not in the USA. It's crazy that a few assholes in the Whitehouse can be capable of wreaking so much havoc on the rest of the world.

The world is rejoicing because you've finally elected a leader who has travelled and lived outside the country. Someone who surrounds himself with experts, asking them questions and carefully considering their answers. A leader who is not afraid to admit when he was wrong, and who will do what is required to correct his mistakes. Someone who wants to work with people as part of a team.

The USA has a whole lot to make up for. Electing Obama is a good start. But there is a hell that needs to be done before the nation can be trusted again. The USA hurt us all real bad.
posted by five fresh fish at 5:47 PM on November 5, 2008 [13 favorites]


I'd LOVE it if the EU could actually provide the momentum and power necessary to execute meaningful changes on our large global problems. But they are not there yet. You have to have not only US cooperation but US leadership for these big problems. We got the everything you need.

Except the will, apparently.
posted by UbuRoivas at 5:52 PM on November 5, 2008


What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f---ing changed light bulbs in my house

I am comforted that he cusses in private like a normal person.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 5:52 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hmm. We're back, and let's not worry too much about whether "bitches" is amusing or inappropriate. And while suggestions from foreigners about Kyoto and SUVs are fine, it's not the people on the blue that you need to convince. The fact of the matter is, the US is big, rich, and has lots of bombs. Some things we have done have been great, others have been terrible, but you can't change the world without us, just as we can't change the world all by ourselves.

My fellow prisoners, the US is back!
posted by snofoam at 6:07 PM on November 5, 2008


The USA is rich? How's that, then? Last I read in the financial pages is that you're broke-ass brokey-broke.
posted by five fresh fish at 6:15 PM on November 5, 2008


Jesus. Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent.

Huffington Post:
According to Fox News Chief White House Correspondent Carl Cameron, there was great concern within the McCain campaign that Palin lacked "a degree of knowledgeability necessary to be a running mate, a vice president, a heartbeat away from the presidency," in part because she didn't know which countries were in NAFTA, and she "didn't understand that Africa was a continent, rather than a series, a country just in itself."
Truly a moran. And to think she could have been a heartbeat away from the Presidency.
posted by ericb at 6:22 PM on November 5, 2008


UbuRoivas, you seem to be from Australia, a country that is more or less like if you combined Alaska and Texas. While you have signed Kyoto and we have not, you signed it less than a year ago. Per capita greenhouse gas emisisons in 2000: Australia is 5th or 9th highest depending on if you count "land use change" (which is probably deforestation), the US is 7th or 14th. Australia has all the bad features of the US, just minus the actual importance in the world. Instead of lecturing us, why don't you start by changing your country? Thanks!
posted by snofoam at 6:22 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Editor & Publisher:
Carl Cameron talking to Bill O'Reilly just now on Fox reveals that McCain aides were truly "shocked" at the lack of knowledge Sarah Palin displayed once they were stuck with her. He said that, in the most startling shortcoming, she actually "thought Africa was a country, not a continent." This led, among other things, to her asking how, in that case, South Africa could be a separate country. She also could not name all of the countries in North America, he said, not even the NAFTA partners. And she did not know many of the basics of civics and local/state/national duties.

That explains, he said, why tensions erupted as McCain aides were truly alarmed by all of this -- yet Palin wanted to speak out freely. So in the closing week or so, they reveal, she took to yelling and screaming at aides over her press clippings, even "tossing papers" around. She was so out of touch she actually refused coaching before the Katie Couric interviews, then yelled at staffers for not preparing her better or warning her off the interviews.
posted by ericb at 6:27 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


five fresh fish, we have the largest GDP of any country in the world, eh. also, i'm not some kind of crazy nationalist. i think it's weird to see giant american flags on every house or see people chanting U-S-A. but your USA-bashing is pointless, counterproductive and, in your latest comment, ignorant, eh.
posted by snofoam at 6:27 PM on November 5, 2008


This is pretty fuckin' cool.

As a Canadian, I'm more than a little concerned about where he stands on trade and protectionism. However: I know that we'll be dealing with a man of honour, who believes in negotiation, and compromise, and in building relations rather than ignoring or dismantling them. And it's been a long time since there's been a man of honour in the White House.

Anyhow. I am glad that you opted for hope over fear. The guy inspires me more than any of my own leaders ever have.
posted by ten pounds of inedita at 6:28 PM on November 5, 2008


Is it wrong of me to enjoy hearing the lamentation of the women over on free republic?
posted by BrotherCaine at 6:28 PM on November 5, 2008


GDP per-capita isn't top rank, either nominal or ppp, but it is ahead of Canada's.
posted by BrotherCaine at 6:30 PM on November 5, 2008


CitizenD: I shall never, ever ever understand how a group of people (such as blacks or hispanics) who have been on the receiving end of bigotry, racism and hatred could turn around and practice prejudice against another group.

The key to understanding (intellectually, at least, even if it still feels unthinkable and counterintuitive) is to realize that while we may see civil rights for African-American/Latinos/etc. and civil rights for LGBT people as apples-to-apples, for plenty of other folks (regardless of race), it's very much apples-and-oranges.

That is: our side, generally speaking, sees sexuality as comparable with gender/race/ethnicity/etc. -- that is, being gay or bi is like being a woman, or Latino, or whatever. (This is the view that's supported by current scientific research, of course.) Therefore, it's automatically absurd/immoral/unfair to discriminate against someone for being gay, exactly as it's absurd/immoral/unfair for discriminating against someone for being a woman or an African-American. (Or, in legal terms, we see sexuality a suspect classification.)

But for the other side, generally speaking, sexaulity is not seen this way; it's not a matter of identity or classification but rather one of morality and behavior -- or as someone once said to me, "it's not someone's fault for being black, so they should have the same rights as white people; it is someone's fault if sleep with someone of the same sex, so they shouldn't have the same rights as straight people." In this model, being LGBT is NOT something you're born with, it's something you choose -- and that choice is immoral. Therefore it's not the same as the civil rights struggles of the past and not deserving of protection.

The uncomortable truth is, oppressed groups do not automatically have empathy for other oppressed groups -- in fact, that's one of the primary reasons racism has been so fucking deep and pervasive in this country (as Frederick Douglass noted, "Those masters secured their ascendancy over both the poor whites and blacks by putting enmity between them -- they divided both to conquer each"). Our task is going to be to try to bridge that gap of understanding wherever possible.
posted by scody at 6:34 PM on November 5, 2008 [7 favorites]


Truly a moran. And to think she could have been a heartbeat away from the Presidency.

Nonsense -- she passed the rigorous Republican VP vetting process with flying colors:

Q: Are you white?
A: Yes!

Q: Are you a conservative christian?
A: You Betcha!
posted by brain cloud at 6:35 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


BrotherCaine, I was actually referring to the country, not the individual citizens. The US GDP (not per capita, although like you say per capita is also high) is gigantic and is hugely important to the world economy. Likewise in many areas. Our foreign aid, though relatively small as a % of GDP compared to most European countries (and Japan even more so), is also really big. The fundamentals of our economy may not be that great right now, but it's still super-size.
posted by snofoam at 6:35 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


As an oldish white guy, I'm really happy that we aren't the only people who get the job anymore.
posted by Nabubrush at 6:48 PM on November 5, 2008


Australia has all the bad features of the US, just minus the actual importance in the world. Instead of lecturing us, why don't you start by changing your country?

Go fuck yourself, ugly American.
posted by five fresh fish at 6:49 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


snofoam: while I was about to ask that we not turn this into a total derail over Kyoto, I should at least respond.

you seem to be from Australia, a country that is more or less like if you combined Alaska and Texas.

I'm not sure whether you mean in terms of culture, resources, natural beauty or size, but whatever you meant, so what?

While you have signed Kyoto and we have not, you signed it less than a year ago.

That was because it took a change of government, and Kyoto was signed & ratified immediately. It was, in fact, one of the popular election promises that led to the downfall of the old government. Unfortunately, our previous conservative Prime Minister was a master of wedge politics, and had his tongue so far up Bush's asshole that we slavishly followed whatever Bush said or did for years. Afghanistan, Iraq, Kyoto, and 1001 shameful UN resolutions where the US & Australia were the *only* parties, time and time again, voting the same way against the rest of the world. Luckily, we shook off our demon; it's your turn now to follow suit.

Per capita greenhouse gas emisisons in 2000: Australia is 5th or 9th highest

Small country, large primary resources industry. That iron & steel & aluminium (etc) has to come from somewhere, you know. You could ship the ore offshore & refine it there, but that would hurt the environment more. And in any case, ratifying Kyoto means that we've actually made the formal commitment along with most of the rest of the world (excluding the US) to improve our game.

Australia has all the bad features of the US, just minus the actual importance in the world.

Actually, no and no. Our right wing is nowhere near as scary as yours, welfare is good, crime is non-existent in comparison, the rich-poor divide isn't nearly as bad, and we get a guaranteed four weeks of holidays per year, not counting sick leave & public holidays.

As for importance, size isn't everything. Until the recent "deputy sheriff" shit, we actually used to take a strong leading role in numerous UN / international treaties & agreements, precisely because of our small size & perceived neutrality in comparison with world industrial heavyweights.

Instead of lecturing us, why don't you start by changing your country?

Like I said before, we (finally) got rid of our conservative idiot of a Prime Minister, and got onto the program with the rest of the world regarding Kyoto. In time, there's hope of regaining the former trusted & respected independent status of yesteryear, before Howard turned us into Bush's shameful lapdog.

But, yeah. This whole derail came out of "Only we can lead & save the world!!1!!1"*

* "Oh, but not if it requires any actual *change*, like jobs going offshore, or anything like that..."
posted by UbuRoivas at 6:50 PM on November 5, 2008 [11 favorites]


EarBucket: "Jesus. Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent."

Good God. What the fuck were they thinking?

In that clip, the Fox pundit notes that the campaign considered Palin a "Hail Mary" move and defended their choice by pointing out that, until the onset of the financial crisis, her candidacy had propelled McCain into the lead.

Considering those facts, along with the revelation that Palin is even more of a damfool than we dared suspect, I am seriously considering the idea that, by preventing those craven, shortsighted imbecils from gaining power, the financial crisis was worth more material good to the world than it cost.
posted by Rhaomi at 6:52 PM on November 5, 2008 [5 favorites]


What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f---ing changed light bulbs in my house

I am comforted that he cusses in private like a normal person.


Me too! I don't want him to be too squeaky clean!
posted by orange swan at 7:00 PM on November 5, 2008


Australia has all the bad features of the US

hehe - and you've got Rupert Murdoch!
posted by UbuRoivas at 7:00 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I am comforted that he cusses in private like a normal person.

I'm comforted that he was as frustrated by the inane debate format as I was. If he'd actually said that to Brian Williams on live TV, I'd nominate him to be Emperor For Life.
posted by EarBucket at 7:04 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


(Australia) a country that is more or less like if you combined Alaska and Texas.

what
posted by nudar at 7:12 PM on November 5, 2008


I used to think it was kind of silly for black athletes to give themselves Muslim names, but if they hadn't, 'Barack Hussein Obama' would have been too strange in mainstream American ears for him to have had a chance of being elected.

Strange.
posted by jamjam at 7:13 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


More on Africa as a continent:

He said that, in the most startling shortcoming, she actually didn't "understand that Africa was not just a country, but a continent." This led, among other things, to her asking how, in that case, South Africa could be a separate country.

This woman is dumb as a box of rocks. She's even stupider than we imagined back in the epic original Palin thread. McCain put her next in line for the presidency, and yapped for two months about "Country First"? Fuck both of them, right in the ears.
posted by EarBucket at 7:17 PM on November 5, 2008


I shall never, ever ever understand how a group of people (such as blacks or hispanics) who have been on the receiving end of bigotry, racism and hatred could turn around and practice prejudice against another group.

The same way a kid who's abused is more likely to grow up and repeat the pattern. Notice I said "more likely", these things aren't written in stone.

There is one slight crack in my armor of hope today, and that's the continued idea that advances in social equality automatically negate the effects of past inequality. There are a lot of aspects of Black life in America that are more likely to be dysfunctional, and a lot of the time trying to address those things in the context of broader society just comes of as grievance or pointing fingers.

Black people also get bitter and cling to religion, guns and intolerance. As with all communities, enlightenment comes with education, social mobility and access to opportunity.

and the black vote may have been 70% but everybody else was at around 50%. That extra 20% sucks, but there's enough shame to go around.
posted by billyfleetwood at 7:24 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


I've been working myself into a bit of a state watching this from Canada. Congrats and good luck, America!
posted by bonobothegreat at 7:26 PM on November 5, 2008


Heh. Check out palinaspresident.com.
posted by EarBucket at 7:29 PM on November 5, 2008


It was wonderful here, but still too close. The early results from Virginia were deeply worrisome, with something like a 12% advantage for McCain.

Our day started at 5 am to get to the polls before the opening time of 6 am. Despite getting there at 5:35, there was already a line halfway around the block, and we didn't get home until 7 am.

After work, I met up with a bunch folks for drinks to watch the returns, and later the speeches. The core of us that stuck it out until Obama's speech were rapt for it, and more than one of us teared up.

Out on the streets it was just nuts. The streets were flooded with people waving to strangers and honking and cheering and smiling from ear to ear and running down rows of cars to high-five the people in the cars. Standing in between Connecticut and M and 18th, a European man walked up, asked if I'm an American, and then congratulated me and gushed about tonight as a triumph for American democracy.
posted by NortonDC at 7:29 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


more or less like if you combined Alaska and Texas.

what


yeah, that's what i was trying to work out, too.

i mean, americans say that sydney is more or less san francisco, and melbourne is akin to chicago.

the rest of the country is irrelevant, so i guess that would make it the equivalent of the flyover states.
posted by UbuRoivas at 7:44 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent.

I'm going to go ahead and make this prediction now, so that if I turn out to be right I can link back and crow "I told you so!" (and so if I'm wrong it'll go unnoticed in a 14,286 comment thread) (and anyway it might distract from the USA SUXX0RS! NO we R xCepShonal! argument already in progress, which would make it all worthwhile):

Within two years, Fox News will be further left-wing than the love child of Keith Olbermann and Rachel Maddow. They will never once acknowledge that anything has changed, but Bill O'Reilly will have quietly retired for "health reasons", Sean Hannity will have mysteriously failed to return from a deep-sea fishing expedition, the interchangeable shiny anchors will be filing stories like "Neocons: Threat or Menace?" and Al Franken will host a weekly call-in show from the Senate floor.

Because Rupert Murdoch knows which side of the wind the handsaw is buttered on, if you know what I mean. And I think you do.
posted by ook at 7:49 PM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


Fuck both of them, right in the ears.
posted by EarBucket


presumably, with a bucket of cocks.
posted by UbuRoivas at 7:52 PM on November 5, 2008


Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent.

There are going to be many more juicy revelations like this. And I cannot tell you how eagerly and happily I am about that.
posted by orange swan at 7:57 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


Sigh.... "And I cannot tell you how eagerly and happily I am about looking forward to that."

Apparently I'm so very eager and happy that my proofreading skills have deserted me. But they've failed me before for worse reasons.
posted by orange swan at 8:00 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


No, the USA did not leave…it denied climate change and stymied all attempts at dealing with the problem

I figured I'd see a comment like this from up north. Last I saw, Canada was farther from Kyoto compliance than the U.S., and I don't think Harper is particularly enthusiastic about speeding up Canada's compliance.

Let me know when Kyoto has some meaning other than "Stéphane Dion's dog."
posted by oaf at 8:28 PM on November 5, 2008


When she fomented the nastiness by going rogue with the Ayers argument and her other red-meat attacks, Palin risked sending this country into an implosive civil war. If anything had happened to Obama, I don't think the Republican party -- or most American cities -- would be left standing.

And this ill-informed... hell, I'd take four more years of Dubya over her being allowed in the Oval Office.

I hope we never, ever, ever, ever, ever find out how terrible a president Palin could be.
posted by dw at 8:35 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


The Palin dirt surfaces. To think this nightmare almost was elected.

Just saw this video about how the actor, Tim Robbins, tried to vote in NYC, where he's voted for a decade and found his name taken off the voting list. He had to go to a judge, get papers allowing him to vote! And he found that *30* other people at that same polling place went through the same bs! What an outrage!
posted by nickyskye at 8:39 PM on November 5, 2008


We did leave. After 9/11, we retreated into our shells...
Yes, I agree. But in another sense, you've gone nowhere. The Americans we know and love (and more) have always been there. You were there when you sorta voted him in in 2000, and there again when he whammed home in 2004.

Pharyngula was talking about this earlier:
We're still afflicted with the curse of religiosity as a political prerequisite, and Obama has strengthened it. That is a poison that will harm us over the long term; we may have made the more rational choice in this one election, but reinforcing the potency of irrationality will come back to bite us over and over again.
I didn't want to go as far as him in raining on the parade, as something happened last night that a whole lot of us have been longing for, for a very long time. But like someone said upthread, the work is only just beginning.

Nearly half of the electorate was ready to vote for tax cuts and a spending freeze as the economy imploded; was ready to vote for something sold as "more Bush". That's terrifying. But it's also just as much America as was the wave that swept over you last night.

It's not enough to say "we didn't vote for Bush, they did" and only claim last night as the return of the real America. Because we know that the other real America is just biding its time, waiting in the wings. When the economy's turning up again, when a tax cut sounds appealing, when religion is Under Attack, they'll be back. Hopefully not in 4 years, maybe not even 8. But soon. And we've already seen how quickly incompetence and malign intent can destroy something good.

So it's dangerous to pretend that America went away. The America that voted in 2004 is just as much your America as the one that voted yesterday. Own that, and you're halfway to fixing it.
posted by bonaldi at 8:47 PM on November 5, 2008 [4 favorites]


UbuRoivas, you seem to be from Australia, a country that is more or less like if you combined Alaska and Texas.

And this is why Australia is so awesome. And that's before you add in the marsupials, footie, national health plan, and Lauren Jackson.

Australia has all the bad features of the US, just minus the actual importance in the world.

Dude, that's a cheap shot. We're all friends now, remember?
posted by dw at 8:58 PM on November 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


Fox News reports Palin didn't know Africa was a continent.
There are going to be many more juicy revelations like this.


Why was this dirt never revealed prior to the election? How could it not be considered important that they are being asked to elect someone dumber than dirt?

Last I saw, Canada was farther from Kyoto compliance than the U.S.

And this is germane to the point how?

Nearly half of the electorate was ready...to vote for something sold as "more Bush". That's terrifying. But it's also just as much America as was the wave that swept over you last night.

It is really important to remember that nearly half of America did not vote for Obama. Many of these people are going to stymie progress as much as possible. Putting the nation back on track is going to require a concerted effort by all those who voted for change.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:09 PM on November 5, 2008


Why was this dirt never revealed prior to the election?

Because what we're learning now is the kind of things that was known only to the McCain/Palin campaign, and of course they kept mum about it because they wanted to win. Now it doesn't matter, and there are going to be a lot of pissed off Republican campaign members who are going to be only too happy to spill the beans on Palin.
posted by orange swan at 9:20 PM on November 5, 2008


It is really important to remember that nearly half of America did not vote for Obama.

Good point. The Democratic Party triumphalism is getting a little thick here at MeFi.

I'd add this reminder:

Had McCain chosen a less . . . colorful running mate and had the economy not tanked so dramatically less than two months before the election, Obama might very well have lost.
posted by jason's_planet at 9:28 PM on November 5, 2008 [3 favorites]


The America that voted in 2004 is just as much your America as the one that voted yesterday.

See, I disagree. Demographics are on our side. America is rapidly changing. Older folks are dying off. New milennial-generation voters are reaching legal voting age, with more to follow in 2012. Perhaps a million new naturalized citizens are on the books since 2004. Newly invogorated/previously disaffected members of the eletorate are now voting.

Demographically, statistically, we aren't the same nation that existed in 2004, and we aren't the same nation that will exist 4 years from now. Building on demographic change, we may very well be able to shift this nation toward a significantly more inclusive and progresive outlook. The people on the voter rolls aren't the same. The right, if it is able to comes back, won't be the same right; even today, I've heard from several McCain voters, in person or in interviews, who expressed the preference for McCain but are, ultimately, just as content to accept other leadership, seeing that "the nation wants change, and he's the President, so he gets my support."

Things change.
posted by Miko at 9:32 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Because what we're learning now is the kind of things that was known only to the McCain/Palin campaign

I was under the impression NBC (?) had promised not to tell these things until after the election, which is why we're hearing them now.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:33 PM on November 5, 2008


I was under the impression NBC (?) had promised not to tell these things until after the election

Where'd you get that impression? What the link says is that the McCain campaign had been keeping them under wraps. The suggestion is that the campaign is linking them now, after a clear loss, because a scapegoat is needed. The campaign will blame the loss on an Idiot Palin going rogue and letting the ticket down, preserving a bit of McCain's - and the Party's - reputation among the simple-minded. If only the minx hadn't been such a chucklehead!
posted by Miko at 9:39 PM on November 5, 2008


Rhaomi: "I am seriously considering the idea that, by preventing those craven, shortsighted imbecils from gaining power, the financial crisis was worth more material good to the world than it cost."

...aaand I'm just now realizing the inherent irony of misspelling the word "imbecile."

Of course, I'm not exactly running for the editorship of the Oxford English Dictionary, either
posted by Rhaomi at 9:42 PM on November 5, 2008


I think that the Newsweek article (somewhere upstream in this thread) said that all that stuff was off the record until after the election. Okay--I can understand the journalist's code of ethics. But McCain and his "Country First" bullshit really torques my jaw.

How dare he allow her to run after he found out how incompetent she actually is? The only honorable thing to have done was to drop her or just drop out.

"Country First" my ass!
posted by leftcoastbob at 9:44 PM on November 5, 2008


How is it that major news sources would agree to sit on stuff like this? I mean, how do they get to decide that we shouldn't hear about a candidates significant, damaging flaws? Flaws as freakish as "Not knowing major geographical facts," "inability to exhibit proper behavior," and the like? Dear god, if McCain had won, would they tell us then? "Oh, by the way... we kind of neglected to mention this stuff. We're sure it wouldn't have changed your mind if you'd known any of this."

Then again, Todd Palin would have been... precious. Imagine Billy Carter combined with Roger Clinton, minus any concept of restraint, proper behavior, or awareness of how unimportant he truly is. Wow. Aside from the national nightmare, that would surely be an amusing sideshow.
posted by Ghidorah at 9:46 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Newsweek, that's the one.
As in the previous editions, “How He Did It, 2008″ is an inside, behind-the-scenes account of the presidential election produced by a special team of reporters working for more than a year on an embargoed basis and detached from the weekly magazine and Newsweek.com. Everything the project team learns is kept confidential until the day after the polls close.
WTF?
posted by five fresh fish at 9:55 PM on November 5, 2008


Note that the Newsweek team shadowing the campaign for a year (as highlighted in this new FPP) is not the source of Palin's lack of geographic knowledge, etc. Former McCain campaign folks are now speaking out -- to FOX News, primarily -- with the inside dirt. Expect more to trickle out soon.
posted by ericb at 10:02 PM on November 5, 2008


Last I saw, Canada was farther from Kyoto compliance than the U.S.

And this is germane to the point how?

Because Canada's actually signed the treaty. What's worse—not complying with a treaty you haven't signed, or not complying with a treaty you have?
posted by oaf at 10:05 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


...aaand I'm just now realizing the inherent irony of misspelling the word "imbecile."

There, there. Someone upthread spelled moron as "moran".
posted by orange swan at 10:09 PM on November 5, 2008


Country First

Africa's a country, isn't it? [/sarcasm]
posted by bwg at 10:13 PM on November 5, 2008


There, there. Someone upthread spelled moron as "moran".

what
posted by pointilist at 10:22 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Former McCain campaign folks are now speaking out -- to FOX News, primarily -- with the inside dirt.

Quite a risky career move, speaking out against a prominent party figure like that, from a position of trust.

If I were them, I'd prefer to make use of a text messaging machine.
posted by UbuRoivas at 10:24 PM on November 5, 2008


Because Canada's actually signed the treaty. What's worse—not complying with a treaty you haven't signed, or not complying with a treaty you have?

Again, I have to say: so what? What Canada has and has not done is irrelevant. If I had been talking about reasons the global community were pissed off at Canada, it would be relevant. But I wasn't, so it isn't.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:31 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Also, for the benefit of orange swan: the source of the moran meme.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:32 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


What Canada has and has not done is irrelevant.

Except where it shows that the U.S., relatively speaking, isn't dragging its feet.

As it does here.
posted by oaf at 10:40 PM on November 5, 2008


Whatevers, doofus. I'm sure it all makes sense in your mind. Better luck next time.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:55 PM on November 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


while it's really nice that obama got elected americans shouldn't forget that bush was elected not once, but twice. for me that's a very sobering fact. electing a black president doesn't whitewash all that has happened in the past eight years. from what i saw, during bush's two terms, any opposition was quasi powerless to counter his actions and policies. that a president can do almost whatever he wants and get away with it is a pretty scary thought regardless of who's sitting in the whitehouse (yes yes, i know the US isn't the only country to suffer from corrupt leaders so spare me the but china is worse retorts). i sincerely hope that for the poor and struggling obama tries to enact and inspires some change because frankly i wouldn't wish being poor in the US on my worst enemy.
posted by canned polar bear at 12:39 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


> which side of the wind the handsaw is buttered on

I'm stealing the hell out of this.

(Also, for the benefit of those who haven't seen it: moran.)
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 12:47 AM on November 6, 2008


You have no idea how much of a catharsis last night was for me. Four
years ago, a man whom I had only the vaguest knowledge of took the
stage at the Democratic National Convention. His job that night was to
rally the troops and remind everyone there why they were a democrat
and why they loved America. His speech that night made him a star, won
him the election that he was running that year, and forever marked the
place where his historic and rapid rise to power started.

"That man will be president someday." I thought to myself. Though
honestly, I was thinking 2016 at the very soonest. Even as he
announced his intentions to run for the 2008 elections, I thought that
it was too soon. That he needed more time for American to get used to
this man with a name that brings ignorant fear in its wake. But he
appreciated the immediacy of the moment, and knew that the groundswell
he had started could potentially take him and make him the most
historic and important president in generations. I thought he had no
chance against Hilary Clinton in the primaries, even though I hated
her and did not want a Clinton in White House again, I prepared for a
lesser-of-two-evils vote like I had done in 2004 and to a lesser
extent 2000.

It's difficult to explain the cynicism I have had for politics and our
government. I have spent the entirety of my adult life under George W
Bush as president, every single decision and every single word that he
made was met with forehead slaps and "No, no, no.. this can't be.",
for 8 years. I wasn't old enough to drink on election night in 2000.
Nor were most of the people that were gathered at some dingy punk
house on NE 14th Place, but we were there and watched with horror as
the race was dead even and inebriated beyond comprehension as things
dragged on until the eventual crowning of Bush as our fearless leader.
Four years later I thought we could never be stupid enough to re-elect
him since had so badly run the country into the ground, I found myself
drinking heavily that night too. As a minor I was rarely able to
understand the full complexities and impact of government decisions,
and I shouldn't have. I only knew what I saw on TV and read on the
internet, I wasn't making a living and trying to think of the future,
I was a kid. But since then, I have grown up and grown cold under the
watch of George W Bush.

So when Barack Hussein Obama announced his intentions to run for
president, I was hopeful, but cynical. I couldn't believe that the
nation would ever elect a black man president. Especially one who is
so honest about his past, and is so wildly optimistic about what he
thinks he can achieve. I didn't think he had a chance, but I supported
him from the start. I made sure to vote in the primaries because I
felt it may be my first and only chance to vote for Obama until the
next time he runs. Then he did the seemingly impossible, he defeated
the Clintons. A mighty empire that had been built for nearly 20 years,
a woman who had been planning her run for the White House for the
better part of her life. They had been preparing for this moment for
decades, and Obama was stealing it from them. They were pissed, but I
was elated. But even at the dawn of his official nomination I never
thought he could win the nation over. But time and time again he went
out and told the American public how things were, he did so with such
passion and integrity that people had to notice. The ability of a
president to inspire people to be better then who they are is
something that has not been seen since the days of WWII and Kennedy.
And every day, I found myself inspired by the story of Barack Hussein
Obama.

One day before the election and his inevitable victory, Barack Obama's
grandmother passed away. The woman who had raised him, more of a
parent to him then anyone else. His last connection to his upbringing
was taken away before she could see his greatest triumph and the
triumph of a nation. They say that you never truly grow up until you
lose your parents or those who raised you, the ones who love you
unconditionally and support every decision you make no matter what.
The pain of that day I cannot imagine, but he stepped out of the
darkest day and into the glowing love of a nation. I watched
breathlessly as state after improbable state turned blue on the
television maps, and eventually it became clear that under no
circumstances could he lose. All that was left was for it to be
called, and the moment the polls closed on the west coast, it was all
over. McCain conceded in a very humble and tasteful speech, and Obama
delivered the address that I never thought I would live to hear. Tears
uncontrollably streaming down my face, I watched in silent awe as the
man, the black man with a Muslim name, the man who I supported with my
votes and even gave to his campaign even though I thought his chances
improbable was accepting the mandate of a nation. And as we celebrated
and danced in the streets for the ending of an 8 year night and the
hopes of a better future, Barack Hussein Obama prepares for the
monumental task of repairing a broken nation. In his victory address,
he spoke of sacrifice and work. He said the road ahead will not be
easy, but for the first time I feel hopeful that as a nation we will
be better tomorrow then we were today. Cynical no more, I am a joyous
American today.
posted by mediocre at 12:48 AM on November 6, 2008 [10 favorites]


Whatevers, doofus. I'm sure it all makes sense in your mind. Better luck next time.

Actually, I think that's EXACTLY what Dubya said when deciding not to ratify Kyoto.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 4:59 AM on November 6, 2008


Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin has returned to her home state of Alaska, where she was greeted by dozens of supporters encouraging her to run for president in four years.
posted by EarBucket at 5:01 AM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]


Expect more to trickle out soon.

New York Times: Internal battles divided McCain, Palin camps.
posted by ericb at 5:55 AM on November 6, 2008


There, there. Someone upthread spelled moron as "moran".

'Twas I.

Also, for the benefit of orange swan: the source of the moran meme.

My intent exactly. Thanks, fff, for explaining the source.
posted by ericb at 5:58 AM on November 6, 2008


A related meme -- McCain: The Mavrick.
posted by ericb at 6:02 AM on November 6, 2008


The Republicans are all turning on each other, this piece in the NY Times today I'm sure is the first of many. Although I hate that it detracts from Obama's win (like it was not his win but McCain's loss, and only because of an inept staff - pure bullshit) I will not be able to keep myself from reading one juicy tidbit.

Yeah, Palin was an idiot - we could see that. But what galls me is that the McCain staff couldn't or wouldn't until they were knee deep. Are women interchangeable to them? Window dressing you never really listen to?

That is McCain's great failing. Cindy McCain should write a book
posted by readery at 6:06 AM on November 6, 2008


Pardon me for tootin' my own horn, but
That Sarah Palin does not understand her First Amendment rights doesn't surprise me at all. I'm sure she is equally uneducated about literature, science, art, geography, and American history. The vast ocean of her stupidity will take awhile for us to explore.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 7:14 PM on October 31
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:20 AM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]




Check out this slideshow of folks around the world reacting to Obama's historic win.

CNN video: How the world views the Obama victory.
posted by ericb at 6:29 AM on November 6, 2008


Yesterday evening, after dropping our oldest daughter off at her drama class, I drove downtown and walked into Raleigh's Oakwood Cemetery. I strolled over to Jesse Helms's grave.

I stood there and finished my coffee, imagining the look on Jesse's face when Satan stuck his head in the door to let him know that not only had a female Democrat been elected to his Senate seat, but his state had gone for the first black president. Mmmmm.
posted by EarBucket at 6:39 AM on November 6, 2008 [10 favorites]


I wish I could go back and change it to "the vast ocean of her ignorance" which is more precise. Ah well.

I spent several hours yesterday on the freeper site reading the election night discussion. I was shocked. I was prepared for ignorance, outrage, and backbiting, what I was not prepared for was an ongoing discussion about disenfranchisement. There was some disagreement as to who exactly should be allowed to vote. Whites-only was countered by people of Asian descent declaring they were good Americans. The Men-only idea was very popular because "women always vote for socialism" but one woman replyed hotly that she and all the women in her family had voted for McCain. There were several who favored Parents-only-- I guess because only parents are contributing by growing the next generation. What they all could agree on was limiting the vote to people of property just as originally proposed by the founding fathers-- only creators of wealth should be allowed to decide how America is governed.

There were even a few who thought we should do away with the presidency altogether. One man thought dictatorships created stronger countries and another had "Biblical proof" that God preferred monarchies. So for me, an eye-opening discussion. I read the comments to look for common ground and see how I might better understand McCain supporters. What I came away with is these people --on this particular site-- live in a parallel universe where America and Patriotism and Love For One's Country have completely different definitions.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:48 AM on November 6, 2008 [9 favorites]


Also, for the benefit of orange swan: the source of the moran meme.

That picture doesn't have the whole meme in it. This one does.

The Go USA is important.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 6:50 AM on November 6, 2008


I don't want to speak for orangeswan, and I'll take it back if it turns out not to be true, but I'm about 97% sure she knows the source of moran, and was riffing on it.
posted by Nabubrush at 6:57 AM on November 6, 2008




Can I just point out for the record that Fayetteville, NC went solid blue this year? Cumberland County -- not just the town, but the broader county, which includes a lot of fairly rural white voters -- went for Obama by nearly 18 points.

Those who remember the "small town" thread should take note. As should a certain ex-Mefite who assured us that that particular county was so full of "real" Americans who hated elitist atheist baby killers that McCain was sure to win NC and the county. NC has not been officially called, though it looks good for (love writing this) President Elect Obama. But Cumberland County, it turns out, is nearly as blue as Boston.

Deeply satisfying. I'm guessing Obama did very well with the military vote for that number to be so strong. More remarkably, Obama also won (strongly) in all the counties bordering Cumberland to the south and east.

/gloat
posted by fourcheesemac at 7:09 AM on November 6, 2008




Although I hate that it detracts from Obama's win (like it was not his win but McCain's loss, and only because of an inept staff - pure bullshit)

I do see your point, but let's not forget that there were factors beyond Obama's control that largely contributed to his win. Yes, he is a man of considerable intelligence and ability, with a nearly impeccable background, and he ran a stellar campaign. But he also had the benefit of perfect storm conditions and timing. After eight years of the Bush administration, a large percentage of the country's voters would have voted Democrat regardless of how lacklustre and mediocre or tarnished he or she was (see: the Kerry campaign, 2004). The Republicans didn't have a good candidate to put in the race; they had a very flawed one. John McCain allowed the GOP to pressure him into making a disastrously bad choice for running mate, and ran his campaign badly. And even then, looking at the popular vote, Obama didn't win by that much. If John McCain had even chosen a better running mate, I think we might have seen a different outcome.
posted by orange swan at 7:15 AM on November 6, 2008


Konoila isn't here anymore? Are we too pagan? I hate missing out on Mefi gossip.

This photo essay about Soldiers from the New Yorker from September was great. I missed it when it was on the stands. Photography 16 is the one Colin Powel was talking about in his endorsement of Obama.
posted by chunking express at 7:17 AM on November 6, 2008


I don't want to speak for orangeswan, and I'll take it back if it turns out not to be true, but I'm about 97% sure she knows the source of moran, and was riffing on it.

Alas, I had never seen nor heard of that photograph. I thought "moran" was a genuine typo or spelling mistake.
posted by orange swan at 7:18 AM on November 6, 2008


NC has not been officially called,
My husband and I have been eagarly awaiting that moment. Last night I was tickled to see that one of CNN's maps had fianlly colored in NC as blue. This morning I was gratified to see the Raleigh News & Observer had a huge picture of Obama on the front page above the fold with "Obama turns tide in N.C."
A generation ago, what North Carolinian would imagine that a black man could carry the state in a presidential election?
But Wednesday, Tar Heels began considering what it means that Barack Obama seems to have won North Carolina, along with her sister Southern states Virginia and Florida.

A few weeks ago I was a bit depressed to return here after a month on vacation in California, but now the leaves are turning gold and the state has turned blue and I am feeling better about my adopted home: North Carolina.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 7:30 AM on November 6, 2008


I see your point, too. orange swan - but I hate to take away from the momentum. I am amazed that he didn't win by a bigger margin, with the economy, wars, the incredible voter registration drive and turn out.
I am in Chicago and work with white people that did not vote for him although they typically vote Democrat. It's a Chicago ethnic racist thing. THey claim that they are just responding to the inherent anti-white vibe they get from the Obamas, especially Michelle.
I hate that McCain and Palin fed that distrust. Rush Limbaugh and his ilk kept spewing their hate, and by portraying Rev Wright and the Obamas as Black supremacists they allowed small people to harbor their ugly little thoughts with impunity.
That shit isn't going to change over night.

But Barack Obama, black or white is the right man for the times. He has the judgement and clarity of vision to do the job. And the newness to Washington that allows him to get things done without the baggage of favors owed.

These are exciting times and I am trying to not let the flaws of the opposition take one iota of props away from Obama team.

But please, no John Kerry for Secretary of State!
posted by readery at 7:37 AM on November 6, 2008


Pinch Me ...a message from Michael Moore
“Friends,

Who among us is not at a loss for words? Tears pour out. Tears of joy. Tears of relief. A stunning, whopping landslide of hope in a time of deep despair.

In a nation that was founded on genocide and then built on the backs of slaves, it was an unexpected moment, shocking in its simplicity: Barack Obama, a good man, a black man, said he would bring change to Washington, and the majority of the country liked that idea. The racists were present throughout the campaign and in the voting booth. But they are no longer the majority, and we will see their flame of hate fizzle out in our lifetime.

There was another important ‘first’ last night. Never before in our history has an avowed anti-war candidate been elected president during a time of war. I hope President-elect Obama remembers that as he considers expanding the war in Afghanistan. The faith we now have will be lost if he forgets the main issue on which he beat his fellow Dems in the primaries and then a great war hero in the general election: The people of America are tired of war. Sick and tired. And their voice was loud and clear yesterday.

It's been an inexcusable 44 years since a Democrat running for president has received even just 51% of the vote. That's because most Americans haven't really liked the Democrats. They see them as rarely having the guts to get the job done or stand up for the working people they say they support. Well, here's their chance. It has been handed to them, via the voting public, in the form of a man who is not a party hack, not a set-for-life Beltway bureaucrat. Will he now become one of them, or will he force them to be more like him? We pray for the latter.

But today we celebrate this triumph of decency over personal attack, of peace over war, of intelligence over a belief that Adam and Eve rode around on dinosaurs just 6,000 years ago. What will it be like to have a smart president? Science, banished for eight years, will return. Imagine supporting our country's greatest minds as they seek to cure illness, discover new forms of energy, and work to save the planet. I know, pinch me.

We may, just possibly, also see a time of refreshing openness, enlightenment and creativity. The arts and the artists will not be seen as the enemy. Perhaps art will be explored in order to discover the greater truths. When FDR was ushered in with his landslide in 1932, what followed was Frank Capra and Preston Sturgis, Woody Guthrie and John Steinbeck, Dorothea Lange and Orson Welles. All week long I have been inundated with media asking me, ‘gee, Mike, what will you do now that Bush is gone?’ Are they kidding? What will it be like to work and create in an environment that nurtures and supports film and the arts, science and invention, and the freedom to be whatever you want to be? Watch a thousand flowers bloom! We've entered a new era, and if I could sum up our collective first thought of this new era, it is this: Anything Is Possible.

An African American has been elected President of the United States! Anything is possible! We can wrestle our economy out of the hands of the reckless rich and return it to the people. Anything is possible! Every citizen can be guaranteed health care. Anything is possible! We can stop melting the polar ice caps. Anything is possible! Those who have committed war crimes will be brought to justice. Anything is possible.

We really don't have much time. There is big work to do. But this is the week for all of us to revel in this great moment. Be humble about it. Do not treat the Republicans in your life the way they have treated you the past eight years. Show them the grace and goodness that Barack Obama exuded throughout the campaign. Though called every name in the book, he refused to lower himself to the gutter and sling the mud back. Can we follow his example? I know, it will be hard.

I want to thank everyone who gave of their time and resources to make this victory happen. It's been a long road, and huge damage has been done to this great country, not to mention to many of you who have lost your jobs, gone bankrupt from medical bills, or suffered through a loved one being shipped off to Iraq. We will now work to repair this damage, and it won't be easy.

But what a way to start! Barack Hussein Obama, the 44th President of the United States. Wow. Seriously, wow.”
posted by ericb at 7:42 AM on November 6, 2008 [7 favorites]


Yeah, Palin was an idiot - we could see that. But what galls me is that the McCain staff couldn't or wouldn't until they were knee deep. Are women interchangeable to them? Window dressing you never really listen to?

Emphasis mine. This was the thing that galled me about Palin's nomination -- it was so utterly transparent that McCain was trying to pander to the female vote. "See? She's a girl! Like you're a girl too! And because you're both girls now you'll vote for us! Because you're both girls! And all girls like the same thing! And all girls stick together! It's that girl-power thing!"

Feh.

Waaaaaay upthread I think I mentioned sending a drunken missive to one of my best friends in Ireland right after the race was called; I got her response this morning. The very first thing she typed was a celebratory "Yes we can!"

She's a teacher in Bandon, a small town in West Cork County. Her report on the response there:

Had to watch the results before school. First class I went into and asked the little 13 year olds who's the next president of America. "Obama" was the answer from them all. Its just amazing the hope he has produced in Europe and around the world. People are comparing him to Roosevelt and Lincoln.

She's also mentioned a lot of screenings of clip montages with Obama, Martin Luther King, Jesse Jackson in tears in Grant Park, etc...

I realized; do WE get this excited over the national elections in other countries? Maybe the British PM and maybe other countries once in a blue moon. But nowhere to the extent that we've seen other people get excited about this.

Now, I'm not pointing that out to say that's another reason we should canonize Obama. Instead, I'm thinking maybe it's high time that we started paying more attention to the Irish/Kenyan/Indonesian/Lithuanian/etc. elections from now on. At least, I will.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:14 AM on November 6, 2008 [2 favorites]


"One promise of his victory is that perhaps we can put to rest the myth of racism as a barrier to achievement in this splendid country. Mr. Obama has a special obligation to help do so."

Way to really suck, Wall Street Journal.
posted by lunit at 8:16 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


Alas, I had never seen nor heard of that photograph. I thought "moran" was a genuine typo or spelling mistake.

D'oh! After reading your posts for so long, I just assumed that you had seen that.

You do know special snowflakes aren't literally snowflakes, right?
posted by Nabubrush at 8:18 AM on November 6, 2008


One promise of his victory is that perhaps we can put to rest the myth of racism as a barrier to achievement in this splendid country.

Oh, that's repulsive.
posted by Miko at 8:23 AM on November 6, 2008


Slideshow: McCain, Palin, And Supporters React.
posted by ericb at 8:26 AM on November 6, 2008


GOP Civil War Begins.
posted by ericb at 8:30 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


One promise of his victory is that perhaps we can put to rest the myth of racism as a barrier to achievement in this splendid country.

I guess they'll publish anything. OBAMA SOLVES RACISM FTW!!!1!
posted by chunking express at 8:33 AM on November 6, 2008


Palin: ‘Small, Bitter Type Of Person’ Is ‘Falsely’ Claiming I Didn’t Know Africa Was A Continent
"According to ABC News [video], Palin dismissed the internal criticism and refused to comment on the specific allegations [that she didn't know that Africa is a continent, etc.]:
PALIN: 'That’s kind of a small, evidently bitter type of person who would anonymously charge something foolish like that, that I perhaps didn’t know an answer to a question. So until I know who is talking about it, I won’t have a comment on false allegations.'"
posted by ericb at 8:37 AM on November 6, 2008


Yeah. PRESIDENT OBAMA PROVES CONTINUED BLACK/WHITE ACHIEVEMENT GAP DUE TO LAZINESS, LACK OF INTEREST
posted by Miko at 8:38 AM on November 6, 2008


I wish I lived anywhere other than the reddest of red states (OK) this week. Although it is awesome to celebrate behind enemy lines obviously 67% aren't celebrating (unlike the majority of every blue state and most other places in the world).

The local newspaper and news stations are owned by solid righties and they didn't even use half page headlines on the Wed paper. Republicans won majorities in both the state house and senate. THAT was the big news in OK.

Tensions are high and most of the rednecks around here are in a gun-buying frenzy. My friends who are >$250k earners are scaling back all their local business speculations and developments - preparing to "hunker down" and use as many loopholes as possible to avoid having to participate in taxation at the same rate as the rest of the common rabble. Most of this state has it's collective head up it's ass.

The only salvation is here in the blue. Oh, and the few progressives I run into. At least with them I can commiserate, share the dream, and work together to pull the persuadable into our tent.

Even so, I refuse to gloat about this wonderful political turnaround, and I refuse to rub ignorant noses in the pile of shit they created and perpetuate. That simply won't work in any way with these misguided twits. It is like living in a state where 67% of the peeps are either 1) Racist, 2) Ignorant (and racist), 3) Fundies (and racist and ignorant), or 4) Fucking loaded and above us all.

It is still an excellent place to live and the people are wonderful (politics removed). That is what makes it so ironic. Their religious attitude makes them caring, but only if they can get you to go to church with them or get you to listen about how wonderful their "personal" relationship with the infinite. Forget Jesus, these people are stuck in Deuteronomy.

My favorite line: "Jesus was a community organizer".
posted by HyperBlue at 9:14 AM on November 6, 2008


I realized; do WE get this excited over the national elections in other countries?

You're right. As a rule, we don't.

The thing is, Americans can afford to be parochial because elections in Norway, Japan, etc. don't affect us as much as our elections affect them.

It's a power issue.
posted by jason's_planet at 9:15 AM on November 6, 2008


See, I disagree. Demographics are on our side. America is rapidly changing. Older folks are dying off. New milennial-generation voters are reaching legal voting age, with more to follow in 2012. Perhaps a million new naturalized citizens are on the books since 2004. Newly invogorated/previously disaffected members of the eletorate are now voting.

The only thing that's new here is the votes from the disaffected and the young. It doesn't matter that old people are dying, as people continue to age, and the older they get and the more they perceive they have to lose and they start drifting rightwards.

I only say this because a lot of this reminds me of 1997 here in the UK, when Labour swept to power, ending a miserable 17 years of right-wing Tory rule. Now, just over a decade later, the Tories look like they're back, Back, BACK!! and until the recent economic implosion, the Labour leader looked like a dead duck. There's a by-election going on tonight that will tell us for almost certain whether or not he's unelectable or not.

We too heralded a new dawn in 1997, and just over 10 years later it feels like it has evaporated. That's why you've got to be vigilant and take nothing for granted. Hoping that a demographic change means you can't get Bush III is a hope too far.
posted by bonaldi at 9:37 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


The thing is, Americans can afford to be parochial because elections in Norway, Japan, etc. don't affect us as much as our elections affect them.

Oh, intellectually I do know that that's the reason. Personally, though, I still think it kinda sucks.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:40 AM on November 6, 2008


Mischievous Onion vid gave me a good chuckle.
posted by nickyskye at 9:49 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


I have no doubt that Palin is even less intelligent than Dubya, but considering that these allegations are mainly coming from the FOX newsroom I can't help but take them with a grain of salt. The GOP knows that Palin could take at least a quarter of the base with her tomorrow if she decides to form the Jesusland Pitbull Moose party and absolutely annihilate any chances of a Republican comeback for a generation. They'd say anything to snuff out that possibility. Next week we'll probably hear about how staffers caught Todd totally making out with Trig in an Exxon diaper changing stall.

Not that I don't find Sarah Palin to be completely reprehensible, but if she was as fucktarded as reports claim then it's doubtful she could tie her own shoes, much less have the minimal competency required to govern a state.
posted by bunnytricks at 9:52 AM on November 6, 2008




Aww cute and meaningful cartoon, Obama fist bumps Lincoln.

Does anyone think Michelle needs a better wardrobe? I haven't liked her outfits so far. In a way it's cool she isn't putting on the Washington woman uniform. I like that. It's just that I just didn't like the color combos of her dresses on her.

Obama Beats McCain To Become First Black President - 4294967295 comments?
posted by nickyskye at 10:16 AM on November 6, 2008


Ah. Another day I have woke up to Obama having been elected president.

It makes it so easy to get out of bed!
posted by humannaire at 10:28 AM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


. It doesn't matter that old people are dying, as people continue to age, and the older they get and the more they perceive they have to lose and they start drifting rightwards.

It does matter, because the numbers in each generation are not evenly spread. That means that how many old people there are changes, and so their influence as a sector changes. Take a look at this animated population pyramid. You can see "lost" generation and the WWII generation as skinny points. Then the hulking baby boom comes along, generating a wider lump that ages upward with a lot of force. They have been setting the agenda for more than twenty years and will continue to do so until their numbers wind down. In the next generations, we have a generation-x population dip, then a milennial mini-boom, and then the numbers smooth out and become a little more even, growing incrementally instead of in boom-and-bust cycles.

While conventional wisdowm hs it that people "shift rightward" because they have "mopre to lose," think about what it is they have to lose and the shift may not necessarily be to the right. The baby boom generation has, essentially, changed the world to meet its needs at every life stage, and they are used to using government to do it. Schools and the college system expanded drastically to accommodate them. They wanted birth control, no-fault divorce, civil rights, Head Start, day care for their children, family medical leave, afterschool programs, help with college tuition -- and they got all that through use of the legislative process. Now they are entering their senior years. What do you think they will want? More scientific research on disease prevention and management. Medicare and better private insurance. Investment in training geriatic practitioners. A stabilized Social Security system. Things that are part of the social safety net - big government programs and initiatives that they have come to expect and will not be shy about demanding. The agenda they will be seeking as a bloc is not a rightist agenda, but one with plenty of entitlements.

But meanwhile, they will not be able to gut programs for younger people to pay for, say, Social Security, because as their needs increase, their numbers relative to other demographic groups will be diminishing. For that reason, unifying solutions will be required.

And finally, the numbers aren't the sole determinant. The ethnic and racial makeup of the numbers also matters. While the population "pyramid" is gradually turning into more and more of a straight-sided column, fewer members in each generation are white. By 2050 there is no longer a white majority in the nation. Black, Native, Asian, and Latino Americans are seeing higher rates of population growth than whites. Many of these groups have traditionally aligned with the left because of exclusionary sensibilities on the right, but in reality, their allegiance is up for grabs by the party or polarity that does the best job of convincing those people who are aging upward into the vote now, and who are now being born. An Obama presidency that overtly values inclusion could be instrumental in swaying a large majority of young Americans, both white and nonwhite, leftward.
posted by Miko at 10:36 AM on November 6, 2008 [8 favorites]


So, that long comment I made about coming to Obama... I want to change that last paragraph, because the more I look at it, the more I feel like I got carried away with the wrong emotion.

So if you'll indulge me, I'm going to rewrite it:

And that half-Kenyan, half-whitebread dude who makes Oxford shirts look damn sexy, with the hot wife and the adorable kids? He's America. He's what we are, mutts that fought and worked and sacrificed our way to the top. And he's what we want to be. In every way, he exemplifies this strange, eternal optimism of the American mindset. I don't know if we're going to be perfect, or even better stewards of the environment. I don't know if we'll ever be able to leave well enough alone in global politics and be more polite and less clumsy. I know that we'll never live up to the impossible standards so many in the world have for us. But, for the first time in my life, I think we might could do it. Because, for the first time in my life, I saw that our founding myths, that anyone can be president with hard work and determination, that you can become what you want to become if you're willing to fight for, and that all men truly are created equal, aren't myths at all. They're true. For once, they are true.

So, we'll try to be better. We will try to work and play well with others. But more than that, I think we're going to work together to try. I have heard countless people, friends of mine, people who are successful in business and academia, wondering how they can get into government, whether it's time for them to go to Washington and do the people's work. And I've wondered that myself, whether there's a role for a long-time web geek in an Obama administration. Maybe the age of selfishness is ending. Maybe our layers of post-Watergate cynicism are cracking like old varnish.

Maybe we will form that More Perfect Union. Maybe. Yeah, it's sappy, and it's trite. But, maybe. For the first time in my 36 years, it's not a head shake or a guffaw or an ironic eyeroll. It's maybe.

I hope. For the first time, I hope.
posted by dw at 10:37 AM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]


Whatevers, doofus. I'm sure it all makes sense in your mind. Better luck next time.

Thanks for helping me disprove your claim above! (Which I've done.)
posted by oaf at 10:42 AM on November 6, 2008


Ha ha ha. Guilford County, NC, the county where Palin declared her love for the "real Americans" who lived there (in Greensboro), went for Obama/Biden too!

By nearly 20 points. Chew on that, righties. Your "Real Americans" voted overwhelmingly for the black guy!
posted by fourcheesemac at 11:15 AM on November 6, 2008 [7 favorites]


An Obama presidency that overtly values inclusion could be instrumental in swaying a large majority of young Americans, both white and nonwhite, leftward.

It could, yes. Because nothing you've talked about spells a natural constituency for the left arising, merely that it might have an easier time.

Which brings me back to my original point: this is going to be something that has to be worked for. America's not going to naturally evolve its religionist right-wing tendencies out, they're going to have to be pushed out.
posted by bonaldi at 11:34 AM on November 6, 2008


Does anyone think Michelle needs a better wardrobe? I haven't liked her outfits so far.

YES! I thought her dress on election night was terribly unflattering. She's such a beautiful woman! I really hope to see her bloom into a sort of Jackie Kennedy first lady, but that dress... oi.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 11:40 AM on November 6, 2008


Chinese media sighs in collective relief as it finds a local angle: Half brother congratulates Obama
MARK NDESANDJO, Barack Obama’s half brother and six-year resident of Shenzhen, sent his congratulations to Obama yesterday immediately after the U.S. Democratic senator won the 2008 presidential election.
posted by Abiezer at 11:44 AM on November 6, 2008




Obama's new site: Change.gov
posted by inconsequentialist at 12:43 PM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]


Can we just fast-forward to January 20th now?
posted by hellbient at 12:54 PM on November 6, 2008


Change.gov

God, seeing the words "Office of the President-Elect" up at the top felt tremendous. I keep realizing anew every few hours that it's real. It's happening. Barack Obama really is going to be the President in a couple of months. We did it.
posted by EarBucket at 1:01 PM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


nothing you've talked about spells a natural constituency for the left arising, merely that it might have an easier time.

Exactly. Conditions are far more favorable for the left in the near-to-middle future than for the right.

this is going to be something that has to be worked for.

Of course, parties do have to work to win their constituencies.

America's not going to naturally evolve its religionist right-wing tendencies out, they're going to have to be pushed out.


Sort of, but I partially disagree. The American religious right as we know it is a pretty new phenomenon. IT arises out of a confluence of historical, economic, and political motivators, and the conditions under which it's been thriving are changing very rapidly. There will have to be some pushing, but the cultural and economic factors that are creating a changing America don't lend themselves to an increased growth in the socially conservative, white religious right. They just don't.

Most large cultural phenomena like the political lean of a nation aren't reducible to simple factors. There are always multiple elements that create change. But the conditions of a nation's demographics play a large part in its national outlook.

Demographics are one of the main factors responsible for the ways in which -America in the 30s was different from America in the 50s was different from America in the 80s, all of which are different from America now. America 2030 will also be a different political pond to go fishing in.
posted by Miko at 1:03 PM on November 6, 2008


OMG, according to Nate Silver, Obama looks likely to win Omaha's standalone electoral vote!

Sweeeeeeet.
posted by fourcheesemac at 1:22 PM on November 6, 2008


Demographics are one of the main factors responsible for the ways in which -America in the 30s was different from America in the 50s was different from America in the 80s, all of which are different from America now. America 2030 will also be a different political pond to go fishing in.

My fear ultimately comes from the ways in which America in the 30s was similar to America in the 50s and similar as America in the 80s. You guys have a history of trashing the legacies of great or good Presidents, after all. America 2030 will be a different pond, but it's still gonna have a certain kind of water.
posted by bonaldi at 1:50 PM on November 6, 2008


Day One.
posted by EarBucket at 2:07 PM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]


Just had this NYT quote pointed out to me. In case anyone else didn't see it:
"Rosa Parks sat in 1955. Martin Luther King walked in 1963. Barack Obama ran in 2008. That our children might fly."
First black President of the USA. Fuck all the trimmings and even what happens next, that's just awesome, isn't it?
posted by bonaldi at 2:12 PM on November 6, 2008


Barack Obama's new website:

change.gov

Change.gov provides resources to better understand the transition process and the decisions being made as part of it. It also offers an opportunity to be heard about the challenges our country faces and your ideas for tackling them. The Obama Administration will reflect an essential lesson from the success of the Obama campaign: that people united around a common purpose can achieve great things. President-Elect Obama reminded the country of our limitless potential when he claimed this victory:

Maybe FPP material, though I suspect people need a break from all this.

But once again, he surprises. The web is going to be something different in relation to politics if he can continue to leverage the successes of his campaign's use of technology to develop constituencies and activism.
posted by fourcheesemac at 2:21 PM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


Ooo, ooo, ooo! Obama named Bill Ivey to his transition team to oversee the NEA, NEH, and IMLS. A folklorist. (Just like Clinton did with Bill Ferris). This bodes mightily.
posted by Miko at 3:26 PM on November 6, 2008


change.gov

So, he means it?
posted by zennie at 3:52 PM on November 6, 2008


I know Bill Ivey.

Hmmm.
posted by fourcheesemac at 3:58 PM on November 6, 2008


Michelle Malkin created a site where you can send Sarah Palin a message thanking her for all of her hard work.

I left a message, but it was probably not in the spirit Malkin intended. Okay, it was kind of the opposite spirit.
posted by the littlest brussels sprout at 4:00 PM on November 6, 2008


Actually, Miko -- did Clinton hire Bill Ferris (whom I also know) for his transition? Because Ivey was head of NEA under Clinton already. It is a good sign, all around, but for all the reasons Clinton picked Ivey, it's also clever.
posted by fourcheesemac at 4:01 PM on November 6, 2008


I left a message, but it was probably not in the spirit Malkin intended. Okay, it was kind of the opposite spirit.

"How you like community organizers now, bitch?"

"Don't let the door hit ya where the Lord split ya!"
posted by kirkaracha at 4:20 PM on November 6, 2008


Thanks for helping me disprove your claim above! (Which I've done.)

If you tell yourself that enough times, it makes it true. Honest.
posted by five fresh fish at 4:24 PM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]


My fantasy line for Barack's acceptance speech:

-- Did you know that bein' a "community organizer" is kinda like bein' the governor of Alaska . . .






EXCEPT YOU GET TO BE THE LEADER OF THE FUCKIN' FREE WORLD.
posted by fourcheesemac at 5:08 PM on November 6, 2008 [3 favorites]






For some reason I am comforted knowing that the impending president is a pottymouth like I am.
The debates unnerved both candidates. When he was preparing for the Democratic primary debates, Obama was recorded saying, "I don't consider this to be a good format for me, which makes me more cautious. I often find myself trapped by the questions and thinking to myself, 'You know, this is a stupid question, but let me ... answer it.' So when Brian Williams is asking me about what's a personal thing that you've done [that's green], and I say, you know, 'Well, I planted a bunch of trees.' And he says, 'I'm talking about personal.' What I'm thinking in my head is, 'Well, the truth is, Brian, we can't solve global warming because I f---ing changed light bulbs in my house. It's because of something collective'."
posted by jessamyn at 5:22 PM on November 6, 2008 [4 favorites]


I love the change.gov website. Not only does it have forms to suggest policy, but you can apply for a job in the Obama administration!

I wouldn't mind a Cabinet level job. Secretary of something-or-other...
posted by MythMaker at 5:52 PM on November 6, 2008


You're right, FCM, I guess Bill Ferris wasn't on Clinton's transition team. He was head of the NEH under Clinton, though. Him I've met, briefly, but not Bill Ivey.

But as someone who depends, philosophically and materially, on the NEA, NEH, and IMLS...I'm pretty psyched that a scholar with his particular background and interests is making some early, important calls.
posted by Miko at 6:21 PM on November 6, 2008


Well I don't know if this has been posted yet but here is a link 700 front pages of newspapers from around the world from the day that Barack Obama won the election.
posted by Sailormom at 6:36 PM on November 6, 2008 [1 favorite]




Well I don't know if this has been posted yet but here is a link 700 front pages of newspapers from around the world from the day that Barack Obama won the election.

It appears some papers had different notions of the main stories of the day than others.
posted by mr.grum at 7:43 PM on November 6, 2008


It appears some papers had different notions of the main stories of the day than others.

Damn, WTF Mississippi?
posted by brain cloud at 8:13 PM on November 6, 2008




For some reason I am comforted knowing that the impending president is a pottymouth like I am.

Richard Nixon, another comforting guy, could cuss a blue streak with the best of 'em.
posted by Oriole Adams at 9:08 PM on November 6, 2008


> A Flickr set.

Was his daughter the first person to get to shake the new President Elect's hand? How cool.
posted by adamt at 9:45 PM on November 6, 2008


When I got my newspaper out of the newspaper box on the day after the election and saw this, I immediately misted up again. In my defense, I hadn't had my coffee yet, but still...damn! That was beautiful!
posted by leftcoastbob at 9:49 PM on November 6, 2008


Richard Nixon, another comforting guy, could cuss a blue streak with the best of 'em.

I seem to recall our lame-duck President described a New York Times reporter as a major league asshole, too.
posted by immlass at 9:51 PM on November 6, 2008


Here's what some fourth graders in Harlem think about Obama's victory.

It doesn't get much better than this.
posted by inconsequentialist at 10:24 PM on November 6, 2008 [2 favorites]


Was his daughter the first person to get to shake the new President Elect's hand? How cool.

Handshake? I think not. That, my friend, is a terrorist fist jab! :)
posted by chuq at 2:05 AM on November 7, 2008 [2 favorites]


Hillary sat in the sunny living room of her house on Whitehaven Street in Washington, a well-to-do enclave off Embassy Row

Seriously?

Heh.
posted by lostburner at 3:10 AM on November 7, 2008


I agree with you Miko. These are among the many good signs for those of us in the arts, education, science, and other communities. Bill Clinton picked Ivey because the NEA was in huge trouble with scandals - he needed a white southern guy who had been head of the country music foundation to stop the fire. As ethnomusicologists turned power politics players (I can think of no others) Ivey is a decent guy, and has the right priorities and definitely the knowledge (this is typical Barack) about how to get things done and make people on different sides of the aisle happy.

Barack frequently mentioned arts culture, arts education, and other long-neglected cultural issues on the stump. It made me very hopeful that he specifically mentioned the sorry state of music education in the US more than a few times. Here's hoping.

Bill Ferris, by the way, is another level of awesome. He's a great scholar of American folk music, and one of the nicest guys in the business. A mensch.
posted by fourcheesemac at 3:56 AM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


An Open Letter to Barack Obama. Alice Walker.
posted by lunit at 5:26 AM on November 7, 2008


Brown and Cameron in Obama clash

Watch the video. These guys are falling all over themselves.

In the Commons, Mr Brown said he hoped to talk to Mr Obama "very soon", saying his election was of "historical significance".

[*I* met him first.]


But Mr Cameron taunted him with a line the PM used in his Labour conference speech, saying: "I read this morning that you had sent a message to the President-elect. Presumably it wasn't: 'This is no time for a novice".'

[He likes *me* the best. ]


Mr Brown said the Conservatives had opposed all the policies to support the troubled US economy that Mr Obama had endorsed and added the "only change they represent is that they change their minds every week".

[*hisses* *attacks*]


Massive dust-ball erupts, cartoon-style, whilst MPs roar their approval.
posted by chuckdarwin at 6:23 AM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


Oh, Lord, the 4th-graders' letters...weepfest.

Though I'm worried that Darnell may not be applying himself. Darnell, change that attitude toward your homework! You can do it.

Rafi, you have the makings of a fine journalist. E'Raya, take a look at the Clean Energy Corps.
posted by Miko at 7:19 AM on November 7, 2008




Barack Obama is Your New President!
posted by lostburner at 9:03 AM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


I had always heard that Rahm Emanuel was a tough political operative, but I had no idea.......

Please use your power for good, not evil, Rahm.

I'm thinking he's there to balance out the overwhelming kindness and gentility that eminates from Barack
posted by readery at 9:09 AM on November 7, 2008


Letterman's Top 10 Sarah Palin Revelations [video].
posted by ericb at 9:15 AM on November 7, 2008


I'm thinking he's there to balance out the overwhelming kindness and gentility that eminates from Barack

A good cop needs a bad cop. A visionary needs a pragmatic bulldog. I took this management class once where they emphasized that you need self-knowledge to lead, and you need to be honest about what your weaknesses are, because then you hire your closest teammates to counterbalance your weaknesses. I think we saw that kind of self-knowledge in Obama with the Biden pick, and the Emanuel pick shows more of it. Obama has a seriously ambitious agenda and needs someone to ride herd so he can focus on concept and strategy.
posted by Miko at 9:23 AM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


SLIDESHOW: World's Front Pages React To Obama Victory.
posted by ericb at 9:23 AM on November 7, 2008


Not everybody is equally pleased.
(Click for an astonishing display of douchebaggery)
posted by Horace Rumpole at 9:34 AM on November 7, 2008


Holy shit, Rahm is intense. They're going to be one hell of a good-cop bad-cop team huh.
posted by Skorgu at 10:07 AM on November 7, 2008


A good cop needs a bad cop. A visionary needs a pragmatic bulldog.

Miko, what you are saying accords well with what my high school librarian, Mr. Neigh, once said to me about Mr. Bright, a former high school principal from another school I had gone to. Mr. Neigh had worked under Mr. Bright when Peter Bright was a vice. He said Peter Bright made an excellent vice because he was a detail-oriented Mussolini type. Mussolini made sure all the trains ran on time. As a vice, Mr. Bright made sure all the clocks in the school were aligned.

But you don't want a Mussolini for a principal (and indeed Peter Bright was a horrible principal). Mr. Neigh theorized that the principal is a visionary while the vice-principal is the enforcer, and that this is the problem with many high school principals, who are routinely promoted to the position because they were good vices.

So yes, this may be what Obama's thinking. He doesn't want yes men, and for the purposes of making decisions he will surround himself with intelligent and independent-minded advisors, but for organizing and implementing he needs an enforcer type to make sure that his orders are followed.
posted by orange swan at 10:36 AM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


.... Or maybe it's just because Barack Obama loves The Godfather movies.

*1988: [Rahm] Sends 2½-foot dead fish, Luca Brasi-style (above, in ''The Godfather''), to pollster Alan Secrest, with note reading: "It's been awful working with you."
posted by orange swan at 10:46 AM on November 7, 2008 [2 favorites]


goodnewsfortheinsane wrote "Dylan is moved. So much, he talked between songs."

I saw Dylan in 2004, just before the elections. That was a good show. However, it would have been a lot of fun to see him play the protest songs as he did then, and not have it end with four more years of Bush. Damn, I knew I should have gotten tickets...
posted by caution live frogs at 10:49 AM on November 7, 2008


I saw Dylan last Sunday; no talking (More like Ain't Talking, amirite?), but he played guitar for a bit of Stuck Inside of Memphis... and was noticeably animated. Possibly in anticipation?
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 11:33 AM on November 7, 2008




I want this thread in my Recent Activity.
posted by iamkimiam at 1:17 PM on November 7, 2008


Did I ever tell you about the time I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville? I needed a new heel for my shoe, so, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. 'Give me five bees for a quarter,' you’d say. Now where were we? Oh yeah—the important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn’t have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones...
posted by UbuRoivas at 2:59 PM on November 7, 2008 [2 favorites]


NE-2 called for Obama. 365, baby!
posted by EarBucket at 3:13 PM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


Krugman: The Obama Agenda
posted by homunculus at 4:27 PM on November 7, 2008


NE-2 called for Obama. 365, baby!

"The Democratic presidential candidate claimed an electoral vote in the Omaha-based 2nd Congressional District — the first time in more than four decades a Democrat won any of Nebraska’s electoral votes"

*pledges a beer to Omaha, for more reasons than one*

yeah, i know it's a nebulous connection, but beaches and beer are involved...
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:34 PM on November 7, 2008


I love how there's so much gold right down in the bottom of this thread. Goodnewsfortheinsane, readery, I'm lookin at you.
posted by tiny crocodile at 4:59 PM on November 7, 2008 [1 favorite]


pencil: "Thank God McCain didn't win"

That reminds me -- if any of you guys ever happen to travel back in time a few million years, make sure not to step on any butterflies.
posted by Rhaomi at 6:07 PM on November 7, 2008 [3 favorites]


Hey, I;m always careful when I do that.

Hang on, why do all these signs suddenly say "NOO WE KAN'T"?
posted by Artw at 6:42 PM on November 7, 2008 [3 favorites]


In other news Bacon beats Fries in Northern Colorado.
posted by Sailormom at 7:42 PM on November 7, 2008


I am monumentally bummed that I do not get to hear what Dr. Hunter S. Thompson has to say about our little electoral upset tonight.

Adding HST to the list of "people I wish could have lived to see this," which already included David Foster Wallace, my Southern pro-integration activist grandparents, and a passionately Democratic former coworker who committed suicide in July. Damn.

Meanwhile, here is some terrific new from Virginia's 5th Congressional District.
posted by naoko at 12:09 AM on November 8, 2008


Australia has all the bad features of the US

Meanwhile, here is a terrific song from the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts.
posted by UbuRoivas at 2:36 AM on November 8, 2008


Meanwhile, here is a terrific song from the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts.

My brain doesn't work right when it is not followed by this little ditty.
posted by Meatbomb at 3:49 AM on November 8, 2008 [1 favorite]


Meato: you might like this.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:21 AM on November 8, 2008




Why can't we all just get along...
posted by doogyrev at 7:21 PM on November 8, 2008


Oh, man. This is the cupcake icing.

NYT: Harsh Words About Obama? Never Mind Now. In which the cold light of day dawns and embarrassed pols try to grasp at some remnants of dignity and grance during their morning-after Walk of Shame. It's all in fun, they assure us, all just the game of politics, even when we're flirting with incendiary racial and religious rhetoric and characterizing our opponents as anti-American terrorists. No harm done.

Palin? "God bless Barack Obama and his beautiful family.”

Michele Bachman? "...Extremely grateful that we have an African-American who has won this year."

Lieberman? Obama is "...a genuine patriot and loves his country."

I admire Obama for being able to shrug this off an move on; it's certainly the wiser response. But it's still disgusting. These people weren't launching run-of-the-mill political attacks and counterarguments - they were insinuating that their opponent was a terrorist criminal with a secret agenda. They said things they knew to be untrue and to be profound misrepresentations. How incredibly cynical - how nearly sociopathic - to laugh that off as mere politics, and play nice now.

Obama's above it - that's why we elected him. It'd be nice if we could elect more of his fellow leaders who are capable of working at that level of professionalism, rather than oppositional stoop-at-nothing playground bullies who toss their packs of matches away with faux innocence as soon as the adults come along.
posted by Miko at 8:15 PM on November 8, 2008 [2 favorites]


Obama's above it - that's why we elected him.

I actually don't want him to be above it. If anyone said something about him that is actionable, I want him to sue their asses. Slander, let alone incitement to assassination, is NOT acceptable.
posted by orange swan at 9:15 PM on November 8, 2008 [1 favorite]


Generation O Gets Its Hopes Up, an OK article from the Times on generational differences and the election. It's a Style section piece, so it's typically shallow, but sort of interesting. There was some better stuff on "On The Media" today about the election strategies, and they were a lot deeper, philosophically, than just "Let's use FaceBook!," which this article sort of implies.
posted by Miko at 8:07 AM on November 9, 2008




I like the monkier "Generation O," especially since in my mind it means "Generation Orgasm." And hey, I'm plenty proud to be part of THAT generation. "Greatest Generation" - whatevs, we've got GENERATION ORGASM.

And no, we're not moving off of your lawn.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 10:10 AM on November 9, 2008


I actually don't want him to be above it. If anyone said something about him that is actionable, I want him to sue their asses. Slander, let alone incitement to assassination, is NOT acceptable.

Direct calls for assassination should certainly be investigated as a criminal matter. But I think taking the high road benefitted not just Obama this campaign, but also future candidates who want to take the high road. Suing people might be acceptable, but only after Republicans have given him ample evidence that they will be engaged in acrimonious partisanship rather than working with his administration.

A big part of the reason Obama came off as well as he did, not just as a presidential candidate, but as a black presidential candidate was because he eschewed any appearance of victimhood, and dismissed the acrimony of his detractors as the kind of baseless trash talk that he'd have heard on the basketball court.
posted by BrotherCaine at 10:41 AM on November 9, 2008 [1 favorite]


Ninety percent of McCain's voters and 61 percent of Obama's were white.
Having 90% of its support come from a group that is declining in share of the population is not a good sign for the future of the Republican party.
The same commentators who dismissed every conceivable American demographic as racist, lazy or both got Sarah Palin wrong too. When she made her debut in St. Paul, the punditocracy was nearly uniform in declaring her selection a brilliant coup. There hadn’t been so much instant over-the-top praise by the press for a cynical political stunt since President Bush “landed” a jet on the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln in that short-lived triumph “Mission Accomplished.”

The rave reviews for Palin were completely disingenuous. Anyone paying attention (with the possible exception of John McCain) could see she was woefully ill-equipped to serve half-a-heartbeat away from the presidency. The conservatives Peggy Noonan and Mike Murphy said so on MSNBC when they didn’t know their mikes were on. But, hey, she was a dazzling TV presence, the thinking went, so surely doltish Americans would rally around her anyway. “She killed!” cheered Noonan about the vice-presidential debate, revising her opinion upward and marveling at Palin’s gift for talking “over the heads of the media straight to the people.” Many talking heads thought she tied or beat Joe Biden.

The people, however, were reaching a less charitable conclusion and were well ahead of the Beltway curve in fleeing Palin. Only after polls confirmed that she was costing McCain votes did conventional wisdom in Washington finally change, demoting her from Republican savior to scapegoat overnight.
And so to shamelessly toot my own horn:
I'm not sure I buy that McCain peaks at all the right times. This feels like an early peak to me. The Palin contribution to his ticket ain't getting any stronger over time.

posted by NortonDC at 11:43 AM on September 14
I'm still feeling damn good about "actual real" America today. Awfully damn good.
The post-Bush-Rove Republican Party is in the minority because it has driven away women, the young, suburbanites, black Americans, Latino-Americans, Asian-Americans, educated Americans, gay Americans and, increasingly, working-class Americans. Who’s left? The only states where the G.O.P. increased its percentage of the presidential vote relative to the Democrats were West Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana and Arkansas. Even the North Carolina county where Palin expressed her delight at being in the “real America” went for Obama by more than 18 percentage points.

The actual real America is everywhere.
posted by NortonDC at 11:16 AM on November 9, 2008 [2 favorites]




Sarah Palin blamed by the US Secret Service over death threats against Barack Obama
"The Republican vice presidential candidate attracted criticism for accusing Mr Obama of 'palling around with terrorists,' citing his association with the sixties radical William Ayers.

The attacks provoked a near lynch mob atmosphere at her rallies, with supporters yelling 'terrorist' and 'kill him' until the McCain campaign ordered her to tone down the rhetoric.

But it has now emerged that her demagogic tone may have unintentionally encouraged white supremacists to go even further.

The Secret Service warned the Obama family in mid October that they had seen a dramatic increase in the number of threats against the Democratic candidate, coinciding with Mrs Palin's attacks."
posted by ericb at 10:11 AM on November 10, 2008


Have we had this yet? There's no one as Irish as Barack O'Bama
posted by Abiezer at 10:48 AM on November 10, 2008


Sarah Palin blamed by the US Secret Service over death threats against Barack Obama

This is interesting, but I'm not a huge fan of this article...it's a bit misleading. The Secret Service doesn't apear to have blamed Palin; they appear to have noted a rise in threats in September (already reported) that "coincided" with threats. I'm certain the rise in threats and the heightened rhetoric are connected, but it really doesn't look to me like the Secret Service went so far as to connect the dots. It's not a connection that could be proven, and the Secret Service is really not in the habit of being an agency that makes such accuations. Instead, it looks like this for-profit security analysis company, Stratfor, made the suggestion. One of their reports is here, and in it they say
"During his campaign, Obama was the target of a few threats that attracted considerable press coverage but in the end didn’t amount to much. Press portrayals aside, reviewing the facts establishes that these incidents were certainly not viable threats to Obama."
There are some interesting comments in the report about the attitudes of white supremacist groups. Stratfor says they are under such good surveillance that they see the greatest threat to Obama as that of the "lone wolf." This report, at least, doesn't mention Palin. The Newsweek story doesn't draw a direct connection, either. I think the Telegraph is going out on a limb in its interpretations of facts which have been known for some time.
posted by Miko at 12:18 PM on November 10, 2008


Palin Sorts Clothes To See What Belongs To RNC
"Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin spent part of the weekend going through her clothing to determine what belongs to the Republican Party after it spent $150,000-plus on a wardrobe for the vice presidential nominee, according to Palin's father.

...Palin's father, Chuck Heath, said his daughter spent the day Saturday trying to figure out what belongs to the RNC.

'She was just frantically ... trying to sort stuff out,' Heath said. 'That's the problem, you know, the kids lose underwear, and everything has to be accounted for.'

'Nothing goes right back to normal,' he said.

Heath dismissed the clothes controversy as 'ridiculous,' and said his daughter told him the only clothing or accessories she had personally purchased in the last four months was a pair of shoes.

...Heath said he brought a pot of moose chili to Palin's house this past weekend.
Nothing like having to paw through roughly $200,000 of clothing, accessories, luggage and paraphenalia that the Wasilla Hillbillies splurged on while using the credit cards of a wealthy RNC donor and those of various Palin aides.
posted by ericb at 3:32 PM on November 10, 2008




dw - you had me until "The people who bailed Europe's asses out of two wars". What a disgusting thing to say.
posted by chill at 11:11 PM on November 10, 2008


They're like that, chill. Don't piss too hard on their national myths.
posted by five fresh fish at 12:08 AM on November 11, 2008 [1 favorite]


And which "they" are you making myths about, fish?
posted by Kirth Gerson at 3:51 AM on November 11, 2008


It's a gross oversimplification that too many Americans take literally, yes, but while I think no one has more of a right to be proud of themselves in WWII than the British, and while we certainly lagged behind a number of countries that stepped up early (Canada, etc.), I think that, starting with cash and carry, then stepping up to Lend-lease, and finally boots on the ground, the United States may well have provided the extra push needed to ensure victory.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 5:40 AM on November 11, 2008 [1 favorite]


(I ignored WWI in my last message as I simply don't know it well enough to comment on what America did or did not do.)
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 5:42 AM on November 11, 2008


dw - you had me until "The people who bailed Europe's asses out of two wars". What a disgusting thing to say.
posted by chill at 11:11 PM on November 10

They're like that, chill.
posted by five fresh fish


You mean, some of us are like that, fff. There's a lot of us living here, let's not paint ALL of us with the same broad brush, mkay?

Anyway. From homunculous' link above:

"It may sound a bit crazy and off base, but the thing is, he's the one who proposed this national security force," Rep. Paul Broun said of Obama in an interview Monday with The Associated Press. "I'm just trying to bring attention to the fact that we may — may not, I hope not — but we may have a problem with that type of philosophy of radical socialism or Marxism."

...I'm wondering what Rep. Broun's opinion was of the Stalinist public surveilance measures Bush implemented.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:37 AM on November 11, 2008


Landed two for one, there. Neither of whom would care to take dw to task for grossly over-representing them.

JKF: more or less agreed. "Better late than never."
posted by five fresh fish at 9:02 AM on November 11, 2008


John Kenneth Fisher - Absolutely, USA was crucial, in both wars (and after the war in fact). Such a shame that some people can't make the distinction between "played a crucial part in victory" and "saved your asses", it really denigrates the USA commitment. I'd probably ordinarily just roll my eyes at this, but today of all days it really hit a nerve with me.
posted by chill at 9:31 AM on November 11, 2008 [2 favorites]


Neither of whom would care to take dw to task for grossly over-representing them.

Oh piffle, fff. I get that you're saying the umbrage at your overstatement rather than dw's is wrongheaded, but it's hardly the indicator of Yank chauvinism you seem to be presenting it as; his understandably exuberant remark was off-base and he corrected himself in a follow-up comment (And you ignored this comment, ostensibly made by another American) and in a later comment dw expresses disagreement with some lame and stupid Aussie bashing. He's hardly the RAH-RAH USA!!! caricature you're portraying him as, and your taking opposition to your dumb stereotype as further proof of concept is as bunk as someone claiming my failure to refute any snide cheap shots you make implies silent assent.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 10:04 AM on November 11, 2008


That's a whole lotta noise over a piffle. I dropped a dozen words chiding DW for his arrogant misstatement. The response? An order of magnitude more words in protest, in overwrought language.

Good god, imagine if I were to write something sincerely critical.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:24 AM on November 11, 2008


I dropped a dozen words chiding DW for his arrogant misstatement. The response? An order of magnitude more words in protest, in overwrought language.

You act as though this surprises you. Odd.
posted by aramaic at 10:50 AM on November 11, 2008


That's a whole lotta noise over a piffle. I dropped a dozen words chiding DW for his arrogant misstatement. The response? An order of magnitude more words in protest, in overwrought language.

My mistake for making an effort to discuss with someone who obviously prefers to take cheap shots and look down on everyone. dw deserves scorn for not showing enough contrition to satisfy you. Americans who disagree with your generalization deserve it for not denouncing his. I deserve it for trying to engage you and your nonsense with more thoughtfulness than either deserves. Got it. Next time I'll save myself the effort and remember not to take the bait.

Good god, imagine if I were to write something sincerely critical.

Magic 8 Ball says 'Doubtful'. Ugly Americans and Smug Canadians are just different sides of the same useless coin.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 11:32 AM on November 11, 2008 [3 favorites]


Not to derail the extended derail, but I found this to be a very sweet take on – oh, I have to say it – the big O...
posted by Mental Wimp at 11:46 AM on November 11, 2008


JKF: more or less agreed. "Better late than never."

Was it Churchill who said:
You can always count on Americans to do the right thing... after exhausting all other possibilities.
posted by BrotherCaine at 3:30 PM on November 11, 2008 [3 favorites]




What's to discuss? I know that not every American is X. Don't much care that you want to make a mountain of a molehill. Seems far more important to you to get all hyperdefensive and offended. I really don't care to invest that deeply in it.

In other news, I learned today that 1 in 10 Canadians took part in WWI. Wow. That's pretty sick, considering that it seems the general consensus is that it wasn't a necessary war. What a waste of lives.
posted by five fresh fish at 4:06 PM on November 11, 2008


Such a shame that some people can't make the distinction between "played a crucial part in victory" and "saved your asses" "provided a useful & niggling diversion that prevented the Germans from deploying their full forces against the relentless onslaught of the mighty Soviet Union"

Much better.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:28 PM on November 11, 2008 [4 favorites]


To be fair, you can make a convincing argument that if not for them we'd all be speaking German Russian. But they'd probably end up speaking it too.
posted by Artw at 4:51 PM on November 11, 2008


I AM Barack
THE Plumber
posted by EarBucket at 7:35 PM on November 11, 2008


Dare I ask...what IS that in his pants pocket?
posted by iamkimiam at 10:12 PM on November 11, 2008


Inside word is that it's nicknamed "The Obaminator".
posted by UbuRoivas at 11:49 PM on November 11, 2008


Not that I don't find Sarah Palin to be completely reprehensible, but if she was as fucktarded as reports claim then it's doubtful she could tie her own shoes, much less have the minimal competency required to govern a state.

Just what has she done to "govern a state"? I mean, we had Jesse Ventura and he basically delegated the actual management to others. What he did was get elected. I suspect that's what SP is good at, whipping up the fundies to vote for her by being "real people" and "plain spoken". Doesn't require a whole lot o' smarts. But I could be wrong. After all, look at my nick.
posted by Mental Wimp at 3:23 PM on November 12, 2008


[Addressing the UN General Assembly] The outgoing US president was unapologetic about the controversial wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many in the Islamic world see the United States as the aggressor in both places, but Bush said that his country was "protecting" Muslims.

"Through the generations, our nation has helped defend the religious liberty of others -- from liberating the concentration camps of Europe, to protecting Muslims in places like Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq," Bush said.

posted by UbuRoivas at 3:06 PM on November 13, 2008










Obama = Superman
posted by brain cloud at 1:18 AM on November 15, 2008




Unsettling Times for Jihadists
posted by homunculus at 12:40 PM on November 16, 2008


President-elect Barack Obama says he will shut down the "war on terror" internment camp at Guantanamo Bay and rebuild "America's moral stature in the world," in a major interview aired on Sunday.

"I have said repeatedly that I intend to close Guantanamo, and I will follow through on that," the Democrat, who takes office on January 20, told 60 Minutes.

"I have said repeatedly that America doesn't torture. And I'm going to make sure that we don't torture. Those are part and parcel of an effort to regain America's moral stature in the world," Obama added.
posted by UbuRoivas at 4:52 PM on November 16, 2008


Oh, great, now the jihadists know we don't torture, so they'll be happy to suicide bomb us, unafraid that if we catch them, we might torture them. Way to go, Obama.
posted by Mental Wimp at 11:14 AM on November 17, 2008


Oh, great, now the jihadists know we don't torture, so they'll be happy to suicide bomb us, unafraid that if we catch them, we might torture them. Way to go, Obama.

*stares*

You know, I'd rather take that somewhat slim chance that that actually WILL happen, if it means closing down a place that's turned the allies we HAD against us, violated our Constitution, violated the rights of at least 500 innocent people and counting, held CHILDREN prisoner, withheld the rights of habeus corpus, and in short, has potentially CREATED future enemies out of previously disinterested citizens.


When it comes down to choosing between preventing the potential problem and preventing the ACTUAL one, I'd say preventing the actual problem wins, wouldn't you?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 2:32 PM on November 17, 2008


Forgot the satire flag on that one, EC. Sorry. I mean, dead suicide bombers aren't afraid of torture, heh, heh. Okay I guess it's not that funny, it just seemed like one of the silly arguments we got from John McCain and Sarah Palin during the campaign. "Ya can't just tell the terrorists what you're gonna do 'cause you lose the element of suh-prise!"
posted by Mental Wimp at 2:55 PM on November 17, 2008


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