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September 27

"I'm not sure whether it mattered. One young man very kindly said to me, 'You don’t understand, women are holier than men.' I said, 'That’s rubbish and it doesn't excuse the insult,' and then I added that I spent 13 years in yeshiva and there's nothing he could tell me that I haven't already heard. Then the original man, the one who refused to sit next to me, muttered to another man as he was walking away, 'She doesn't understand.' I said, 'I understand everything, and don't talk to me as if I'm not here.' He ignored me, and all the other men turned their backs and did not respond or even look at me." [Similar version at JewFem blog.]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 11:47 AM - 53 comments

"This is like the gateway drug of the Jewish foods" - Non-Jews try traditional Jewish food for the first time
posted by The Gooch at 10:47 AM - 88 comments

Doug wants to do other things so you had better go while you still can... Previously
Hot Doug's is a Chicago, Illinois-based restaurant specializing in a variety of hot dogs and sausages. The self-proclaimed "Sausage Superstore and Encased Meat Emporium" is in its second location at 3324 North California Avenue in the city's Avondale neighborhood. Its first location, on Roscoe Street, closed after a 2004 fire. Hot Doug's is frequently featured in local and national media for its unique menu, and its purveyor and head chef, Doug Sohn, has been noted for his work to create affordable gourmet food.[1] The restaurant is an extremely popular dining destination among both locals and tourists, and at lunch time and throughout much of the weekend customers can expect to wait in lines sometimes exceeding an hour just to get in the door. On May 6, 2014, Doug announced that he will be permanently closing Hot Doug's on Friday, October 3, 2014 (WiKi)
Anthony Bourdain(slyt) [more inside]
posted by shockingbluamp at 9:09 AM - 57 comments

Why I hate museums.
posted by shivohum at 7:53 AM - 83 comments

Portlandia is a white show for a white audience, and Portland is a very white place, by design. Kiran Herbert writes about the history of race in Portland and its depiction on Portlandia. Via
posted by Dip Flash at 6:43 AM - 100 comments

"We were homeless; that’s why we were in the hostel in the first place. We didn’t have anywhere else to go. There were 210 other young women living there. Now it’s luxury flats."
A group of young, homeless mothers have taken over an empty council house in Newham, East London, in protest over the council's plans to rehome them to other parts of the country while selling off social housing and closing the specialist hostel where they were living. The Guardian reports: "For real politics, don't look to Parliament but to an empty London housing estate." [more inside]
posted by Catseye at 4:27 AM - 13 comments

"I loathe science fiction," Vladimir Nabokov declared to a BBC interviewer in 1968. A few months later Nabokov published an elaborate sci-fi novel.
Nabokov's Ada or Ardor is one of the works in the Science Fiction in Transition (1958-1975): New Wave & New Directions reading list put together by Ted Gioia, in his day job a jazz critic and music historian. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse at 2:30 AM - 32 comments

Australian journalists must ask what agenda they serve At the end of a week of much media hysteria about terrorism, the Senate passed arguably the most significant restraints on press freedom in Australia outside of wartime.
posted by Wolof at 1:07 AM - 32 comments

"Pride", a critically-acclaimed new film given a limited release in the US today, tells the true story of how a small group of LGBT activists became the biggest fundraiser for the year-long British coal miner's strike of 1984-85. The miners faced a pre-meditated, organized, thuggish, dishonest, deceptive, and illegal surveillance and smear campaign by the Thatcher government, which froze all mining union funds, cancelled their unemployment, and denied food and housing welfare to their wives and children, in an attempt to starve them out. For the first time, the British government trained Britain's police into a paramilitary force, bused in at great expense and in great numbers to overwhelm the protesters, using violent, repressive, and corrupt tactics against non-violent protesters, with prolonged police detentions and the indiscriminate arrest of over 11,000 British citizens. The government was supported by the rightwing tabloid media, who used sensationalist, crude headlines to shape public opinion. LGBT activists reclaimed one such headline as the name of their most successful benefit. Although the miner's strike was broken by the Thatcher government, the miners kept their promise to support the LGBT community, by marching alongside them at the front of London's 1985's Pride parade.. Later that year at the Labour Party conference, a motion was tabled that supported adding equal rights for gays and lesbians as part of the Party's platform. This motion was opposed by Labour's executive committee, but the motion went to a vote – and passed, thanks to the votes of the National Union of Mineworkers and their allies.
posted by markkraft at 1:02 AM - 29 comments

September 26

Sparked is a short film by Cirque Du Soleil about a solitary inventor. And his lampshades.
posted by the hot hot side of randy at 9:39 PM - 8 comments

After eight main instalments and two collaborative instalments (including July's Minnano Hoshi Saga 2), Nekogames' classic Hoshi Saga series returns with a new instalment that changes the formula a little: Hoshi Saga Reishiki. The goal, as always, is to find the star in each level, but this time, you can only use the arrow and Enter keys. Also, there is now a gift hidden in each level. (Previously - see also Nekogames' Ouka, Kikka and Touka, also previously.)
posted by BiggerJ at 9:15 PM - 2 comments

Where is the Drama takes any song input recognized by Spotify and analyses it to find the 30 seconds or so of highest drama, defined as the portion of the song with the largest increase in loudness. [more inside]
posted by TwoWordReview at 4:05 PM - 27 comments

"Dave Beeth-Oven. Maxine of Arc. Herman the Kid. Bob Genghis Khan. So-Crates Johnson. Dennis Frood. And, uh... Abraham Lincoln." Hadley Freeman revisits Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure with Alex Winter, and Ben Child reports on the long-awaited follow-up to Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey.
posted by paleyellowwithorange at 4:03 PM - 59 comments

The exhaustively researched Hollywood history podcast You Must Remember This (Previously) presents a two part episode focusing on Madonna's use of classic Hollywood imagery and references as a form of conceptual art and her early attempts to trade pop idol success for movie stardom within the context of two high-profile relationships with Sean Penn and Warren Beatty. Episode One. Episode Two. Meanwhile, Todd In The Shadows creates video reviews for every movie Madonna was ever in. So far he's done Desperately Seeking Susan, Shanghai Surprise, A Certain Sacrifice, and Who's That Girl.
posted by The Whelk at 3:53 PM - 9 comments

Nothing to do tomorrow (Sept. 27th, 2014)? Well, it's Museum Day Live, and you can score free admission for two at over 1,500 museums in the United States by registering at Smithsonian.com. (Search here to determine if there are any participating museums in your area.)
posted by HuronBob at 3:27 PM - 18 comments

"Marvellous" - the amazing story of Neil Baldwin on BBC IPlayer (UK only) When I was at Keele University back in the early 90s, Nello was already a legend. A campus fixture, I had no real idea what he did there, or what he was doing there. But the stories were legion. A circus clown turned kit man for Stoke City FC, and a "very good friend" to bishops, politicians, footballers, and, well, just about everyone.
posted by bookbook at 3:15 PM - 7 comments

Online diarist mimi smartypants has been typing about her life for just over fifteen years, and now she's considering quitting the gig. "Next week marks fifteen years of this online diary thing, and I have been toying with the idea that maybe that is quite enough, thank you. In fact, I had not updated in so long that I sat down to type a mic-drop “thanks for the memories”-style entry, but then this crap came out instead. So maybe I’m not quite done yet? I don’t know." [more inside]
posted by danabanana at 2:53 PM - 25 comments

Real-Time Face Tracking And Projection Mapping [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 2:03 PM - 13 comments

GUTS is a new online feminist magazine. Topics from the first two issues include Canadian feminist documentary filmmaking; feminist strategies for commemorating gender-based violence; "postfeminist" parliamentary political discourse; Canadian novelist Sheila Heti's genre-bender on women's relationships, How Should A Person Be?; women's paid and unpaid labour; institutionalized gender inequality in organized sport; Indigenous women, decolonization, and institutionalized racism. There's also a blog.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 1:32 PM - 8 comments

Radiohead's Thom Yorke just released a surprise album, Beyoncé-style [vox.com]
Tomorrow's Modern Boxes is only available on BitTorrent, where listeners can download the track "Tomorrow's Modern Boxes" for free, and watch the video. The full album can be downloaded for $6, and will also be available on vinyl and in a box set.
[more inside]
posted by Fizz at 1:28 PM - 49 comments

Female football star Hope Solo was recently arrested and charged with two counts of domestic abuse in connection with an assault on her sister and 17-year-old nephew. Although domestic abuse has rightly ended the careers of male athletes like Ray Rice, Adrian Peterson and Greg Hardy, Solo continues to play for two teams (including the US National team) and maintains her sponsorship with Nike. The BBC asks; does domestic violence have a double standard?
posted by Effigy2000 at 1:26 PM - 122 comments

The new hottest clicking game is Clicker Heroes. For more advanced discussion there's a subreddit with a helpful strategy FAQ section.
posted by DynamiteToast at 12:50 PM - 86 comments

Christopher Hogwood, conductor, scholar, musician and champion of historically informed performance, died on September 24 at the age of 73. [more inside]
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide at 12:21 PM - 26 comments

In 1924 a consortium of lightbulb manufacturers formed the Phoebus cartel. Its goal: planned obsolescence. The Great Lightbulb Conspiracy. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle at 12:19 PM - 50 comments

Back to the Future: The Opening Scene - Kevin Pike Interview - Part 1 (SLVimeo)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 11:43 AM - 18 comments

Dogs of the World: adorable illustrations of dog breeds, grouped by the regions where they originated.
By Lili Chin, whose Doggie Drawings include numerous infographics on dog training and behavior. Some examples: Greeting a Dog, Space Etiquette for Dogs, Positive Reinforcement Training, How to Create a Dangerous Dog.
Wondering about the Boston Terrier who keeps popping up in these infographics? Meet Boogie.
posted by Metroid Baby at 11:42 AM - 15 comments

Metafilter's own Mark Saltveit profiles eclectic Philadelphia Eagles head coach Chip Kelly for Philly.com. Saltveit already wrote the book on Kelly, and the profile is part of a follow-up effort called "Controlled Chaos: Chip Kelly's Football Revolution." [more inside]
posted by Drinky Die at 9:16 AM - 54 comments

"You poked my heart." SLYT. A group of tow headed toddlers get in a row about the weather, adorableness ensues.
posted by sweetkid at 9:09 AM - 55 comments

Season five of The Walking Dead starts in two weeks, and the Internet is getting excited [NSFW]: posted by Room 641-A at 9:06 AM - 28 comments

Washington Post's Wonkblog, leveraging data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and economics and public policy professor Philip J. Cook's "Paying the Tab" looks at how much Americans drink. 30% of Americans don't drink at all. Another 30% consume fewer than one drink per week. To be in the top 10% of American, you'd need to drink the equivalent of 74 drinks per week, every week, or a little over 10 drinks per day.
posted by 2bucksplus at 9:04 AM - 157 comments

She was 22 when her memory was obliterated. Twenty-six years later, Su Meck is still learning about the family she raised and the husband she has no recollection of marrying. Su has no earliest single memory and resents the question (it is the one she’s asked most frequently). She begins remembering around 1992, when she was roughly three months pregnant with Kassidy and a friend who was aware of her condition explained why her period had likely ceased, and went with her to a drugstore to buy a test. [more inside]
posted by lesli212 at 9:02 AM - 100 comments

US Creates Largest Protected Area in the World. Over 3x larger than California, the Obama administration has enlarged the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Fishing, dumping, and removal of coral are now prohibited.
posted by blue_beetle at 9:01 AM - 13 comments

Somaly Mam [previously] responds to the Newsweek article last spring that raised questions regarding the legitimacy of her work as a Cambodian anti-trafficking activist, tainting the nearly two-decades-long work on behalf of victims that catapulted her into the global spotlight. "I didn't lie."
posted by Emor at 8:39 AM - 6 comments

She was determined to fulfill her father’s dearest wish, the wish so common among frail, elderly people: to die at home. But it seemed as if all the forces of the health care system were against her — hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies, insurance companies, and the shifting crosscurrents of public health care spending. The NYT reports in depth on a single case, a snapshot of the typical end-of-life care situation in the United States. A worthwhile but disturbing long read, potentially very upsetting if you've lost a loved one in a similar managed care setting. [more inside]
posted by RedOrGreen at 8:20 AM - 39 comments

OneRepublic just released their latest music video, I Lived, which tells the story of Bryan Warnecke. He's a fifteen year old boy who cycled over a thousand miles in 43 days over 8 mountain passes, raising $260,000 for Cystic Fibrosis research. He also suffers from Cystic Fibrosis. [more inside]
posted by Stark at 7:59 AM - 2 comments

A story about working for the United States Postal Service
posted by curious nu at 7:10 AM - 57 comments

He does not believe himself to be an exceptional person but now understands that if you push yourself exceptional things can be done.
Eight men and one young boy left Bluff, near the southern tip of New Zealand's South Island, on a fishing and mutton-birding trip on the evening of 14 March 2012. Only one man made it back. This is the story of how he survived and his colleagues didn't. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim at 6:53 AM - 9 comments

The NY Federal Reserve is supposed to monitor big banks and prevent another financial crisis. But when Carmen Segarra was hired, what she witnessed inside the Fed was so alarming that she bought a tiny recorder, and started secretly taping. This American Life reports. [more inside]
posted by chavenet at 4:44 AM - 59 comments

Translating technological terms throws up some peculiar challenges
Ibrahima Sarr, a Senegalese coder, led the translation of Firefox into Fulah, which is spoken by 20m people from Senegal to Nigeria. “Crash” became hookii (a cow falling over but not dying); “timeout” became a honaama (your fish has got away). “Aspect ratio” became jeendondiral, a rebuke from elders when a fishing net is wrongly woven. In Malawi’s Chichewa language, which has 10m speakers, “cached pages” became mfutso wa tsamba, or bits of leftover food. The windowless houses of the 440,000 speakers of Zapotec, a family of indigenous languages in Mexico, meant that computer “windows” became “eyes”.
posted by infini at 3:19 AM - 23 comments

September 25

We Made Young Liberals And Young Labor Date Each Other Vice Australia: "Who are those students who join political clubs at university? They wear suits, push flyers, and disagree by default, but what makes them tick? To find out we paired them up with the people they disagree with most—students from opposing parties—and made them go on dates with each other."
posted by cendawanita at 8:32 PM - 51 comments

Eleven, a music video by Hitchhiker [more inside]
posted by ardgedee at 6:39 PM - 21 comments

TedEd gets it wrong when they talk about the history of tattooing. Good thing the Tattoo Historian is here to set the record straight with a concise list of errors. [more inside]
posted by geek anachronism at 6:23 PM - 27 comments

Stuff in Old Books, from Brisbane's Bent Books. Bonus: Things Found in Books
posted by turbid dahlia at 5:57 PM - 28 comments

"Watching a tattoo needle in slow motion reveals the physics of getting inked"

Previously: Ink Punching
posted by davidstandaford at 5:38 PM - 14 comments

Remarkable time-lapse video of artist Marcello Barenghi creating a hyperrealistic drawing of a vodka bottle.
(N.B. All videos contain highly annoying music tracks. Mute button recommended.) [more inside]
posted by Atom Eyes at 3:42 PM - 27 comments

"Many Marines I talk to are skeptical of the aims used to justify the war - fighting terrorism, getting weapons of mass destruction (which they never see). Quite a few accept that this war was probably fought for oil." 'The Killer Elite', Evan Wright's coverage of a US Marine Corps Battalion in the 2003 Iraq War (later developed into the book and TV series Generation Kill). [more inside]
posted by paleyellowwithorange at 3:38 PM - 68 comments

Stressed out? Does the fast-paced world of today have your head spinning? Sit back and relax with the Finnish educational TV show "Hello, Hello, Hello," and the terrifyingly slow adventures of Stan and Dud. Clip most likely to cause childhood trauma : "I'm Cecil. She's Cissy." Most likely to mark you as a Finn who learned English from watching this show: "The cat's in the moon." [more inside]
posted by The corpse in the library at 2:44 PM - 13 comments

An interview with the man who banned in Boston, circa 1930. The New Republic is republishing a haul of classics from its archives in celebration of its 100th anniversary. In honor of banned books week, today's selection is a brief interview/profile of one of the U.S. Customs officials in charge of clearing books for circulation circa 1930. [more inside]
posted by Diablevert at 2:09 PM - 5 comments

This is the story of Greece's Robin Hood.
posted by michaelh at 1:41 PM - 10 comments

Life in Timbuktu: how the ancient city of gold is slowly turning to dust
(a long-form article from the Guardian with an accompanying photo gallery)

posted by tykky at 12:56 PM - 13 comments

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