March 26

Lesbians can't be misogynist, can they?

"My agency was taken away from me, and it was just as terrifying when done by fellow queers as it was when it was men." [more inside]
posted by Athanassiel at 12:30 AM - 54 comments

March 25

Need a therapist? Eat a cookie and talk to cookie monster.

Need therapy? Cookie Monster as a life coach.
posted by Wolfster at 8:00 PM - 17 comments

But in Vietnam there was not only one My Lai—there were many.

"The Scene of the Crime: A reporter’s journey to My Lai and the secrets of the past" by Seymour M. Hersh
posted by AElfwine Evenstar at 7:46 PM - 10 comments

Seth’s quest to get broadband from someone, anyone

What happens when broadband companies lie and claim they service areas they don't? If you're reliant on your home internet connection to work, you may end up having to move out of a house you just bought.
posted by Pope Guilty at 7:31 PM - 79 comments

Game of Thornes

A popular exhibit at the Art Intitute of Chicago is the Thorne Rooms, tiny historically accurate scale models of living spaces from all over the world. [more inside]
posted by bq at 7:20 PM - 15 comments

The 2016 campaign’s most interesting long shot

How Do You Solve a Problem Like Ben Carson?
What If Sarah Palin Were a Brain Surgeon?
Taking Ben Carson Seriously
posted by andoatnp at 5:58 PM - 51 comments

13 Long Minutes

In 13-minute harrowing and graphic long take/oner, Quebec police drama 19-2 takes the viewer inside a school shooting. [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 5:13 PM - 23 comments

“We always say, Someday we’ll meet on Thursday Island,”

“White Australians don’t want to talk about it, and it’s so recent, so raw, that it’s a sensitive topic. And then there are those who don’t even know the Torres Strait Islands exist. So he’s not only educating people around the world, he’s educating Australians. Patty’s a bridge builder. And as an NBA star, he’s got the cool factor. Crazy as it sounds, there aren’t many people who are proud to be indigenous. And Patty, he’s putting it on the world stage." Story of Patty Mills: Spur, Aussie, Bala
posted by colt45 at 4:25 PM - 12 comments

Does What it Says on the Tin

Rap Battle: Hodor vs. Groot.
posted by Smart Dalek at 4:01 PM - 18 comments

This sounds like the setup to Indiana Jones V

WWII-era German coins and parts of a broken plate suggest that a ruin in the Argentinian jungle may have been built as a shelter for Nazi leaders in case of a defeat. (Or maybe it's just archaeologists fooling themselves.)
posted by Blue Jello Elf at 3:53 PM - 14 comments

"I am deeply superficial."

Elle magazine interviews the iconoclastic Fran Lebowitz on style.
posted by orange swan at 3:53 PM - 57 comments

John Prine has not yet released new lyrics

Larry Tribe has a new client. (SLNYMag)
posted by PMdixon at 3:18 PM - 9 comments

Free bananas in Berkeley

"Thousands of Berkeley voters got stuck in an email storm last week after a technical glitch became a viral meme that prompted around 70 residents to hold a potluck picnic Sunday." [more inside]
posted by rtha at 2:13 PM - 47 comments

This is Swing Street!

A TV pilot which failed to attract sponsors, After Hours carries all the poignance of a noble lost cause. Despite a certain self-consciousness in presentation, which clearly aims at winning over a recalcitrant audience, some of the best jazz ever recorded on film is available here. After an opening montage devoted to Manhattan jazz clubs accompanied by the narrator’s patter (“This is my beat — the jazz beat”), one is introduced to the ‘cigarette girl’ and ‘doorman’ at the “After Hours Club,” complete with fictional glosses (the girl is an “aspiring actress”). But as soon as Coleman Hawkins enters, joins the rhythm section on the bandstand and launches into a gorgeous version of “Lover Man,” the film properly gets down to business.
Jonathan Rosenbaum on After Hours (1961), featuring Johnny Guarnieri, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Barry Galbraith, Milt Hinton, Cozy Cole, and Carol Stevens. [more inside]
posted by Iridic at 2:13 PM - 8 comments

"Respect the elves - or else"

Huddled together amid the jagged rocks of the Gálgahraun lava field, a group of nervous onlookers wait with bated breath. Suddenly, there's a loud crack and a tumble of stones as a 50-tonne boulder is wrenched from the ground, then slowly raised into the air and eased down nearby, so delicately you'd think it was a priceless sculpture. "I just hope they’re happy in their new home," says Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir. "The elves really don't like being uprooted like this."
Huldufólk, or "hidden people," are beings from Icelandic folklore reported to dwell in rocks. People are very reluctant to disturb their homes. (Previously.)
posted by Metroid Baby at 11:44 AM - 22 comments

"GooooooOOOOOO INTERNET!"

If The Internet Was a High School.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 11:25 AM - 28 comments

tampon or fungus?

the girls on shit duty
posted by and they trembled before her fury at 11:17 AM - 33 comments

The Hip-Hop Messiah: An Archetype

The hip-hop messiah is both real and not real. [more inside]
posted by ourt at 10:36 AM - 40 comments

Can you wiggle? Can you chomp?

"Grandmother Fish is a book like no other I have seen"
We start with a delightfully drawn Grandmother Fish, who lived a long, long, long, long, long time ago and could wiggle and swim fast and had jaws to chomp with. At once, this is made personally relevant: "Can you wiggle? … Can you chomp?" We proceed by way of Grandmother Reptile, Grandmother Mammal and Grandmother Ape, to Grandmother Human, who lived a long time ago, could walk on two feet and talk and tell stories
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 10:17 AM - 11 comments

Another Nail In The NCAA's Coffin

After years of fighting over keeping the records sealed, the NCAA has finally released to the public their internal documents on the Reggie Bush investigation, as part of the defamation lawsuit filed against the NCAA by former USC RB coach Todd McNair. The NCAA had argued that allowing the records to be unsealed would hinder future investigations, but such arguments were dismissed by the California courts, leading to the release. [more inside]
posted by NoxAeternum at 10:14 AM - 33 comments

"He thought Nashville was the roughest"

On the Road Again: Mapping All the Cities in Willie Nelson's Songs
Over the course of his career—a five-decade ramblin' run that spans recordings as far back as 1962 and as recent as last year—Willie has written endlessly about his affection for (and occasional vexation with) cities across the land. These are all of those places. Well, a whole hell of a lot of them, anyway.
posted by Lexica at 10:03 AM - 14 comments

"First of all, things need to be very, very rainbow"

An Idaho State Senator, Paul Shepherd, has called on the state to impeach federal judges who struck down the state's anti-SSM law. One mistake, though. He forgot to renew the domain for his re-election campaign, and now a gay nerd has taken it over.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 9:28 AM - 21 comments

Hot Town, Summer in the City

What would happen if an 800-kiloton nuclear warhead detonated above midtown Manhattan? [via realfuture]
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 7:47 AM - 187 comments

Communicate affordably with imprisoned loved ones

Pigeon.ly has joined Y-Combinator's 2015 Winter class. While in prison, founder Frederick Hutson was amazed by the cost and difficulty of communicating with those outside. When he was released in 2011, he founded Pigeon.ly (originally Picturegram) to help people send pictures (and, later, make phone calls) to inmates. Additional coverage: The New York Times (2013), Forbes (2014), Planet Money.
posted by Going To Maine at 7:28 AM - 30 comments

Taco to the face

Fritz the golden retriever is really bad at catching food. [slyt]
posted by FirstMateKate at 7:11 AM - 88 comments

Orchids underground: a beautiful parasite

In 1928, a farmer digging in his garden found a flower blooming underground. Three years ago, scientists discovered that it's so well adapted to living underground that it has lost almost all of its chloroplast genes. While this species is unusual for an orchid in the extent of its parasitism, it turns out that all orchids are actually parasites--stealing nitrogen from tiny fungi in the soil without trading any carbon back as plants usually do. See photos of the underground orchid here.
posted by sciatrix at 6:31 AM - 31 comments

Burmese slaves in the global fish trade

"If Americans and Europeans are eating this fish, they should remember us," said Hlaing Min, 30, a runaway slave from Benjina. "There must be a mountain of bones under the sea. ... The bones of the people could be an island, it's that many."

Are slaves catching the fish you buy? A year-long AP investigation into the use of slaves to catch fish that end up in supply chains going to Kroger, Wal-Mart and Sysco, the U.S.' biggest food distributor.
posted by mediareport at 6:22 AM - 21 comments

I would prefer not to.

Clerks. “vain, mean, selfish, greedy, sensual and sly, talkative and cowardly”
posted by bitmage at 5:35 AM - 19 comments

Reactions to 'The L Word' Ten Years On

The Emotional Stages Of Rewatching The L Word Ten Years Later
1. No. No. No. No. No no no. No. NO.
2. YES.
Listling Without Commentary: 22 Excerpts From Brutal Amazon Customer Reviews Of “The L Word”
16. I couldn’t bear having it in my room so I broke it and threw it in a huge garbage next to our house. Hope this review stops you from buying it, don’t repeat the mistake that I’ve done.
17. Turns out lesbians aren’t that interesting.
Also, the comments on the articles (both contain spoilers).
posted by moody cow at 2:10 AM - 65 comments

March 24

The Gravekeeper’s Paradox

The Gravekeeper’s Paradox The impermanency of stone is visible everywhere at Mount Auburn. One headstone Gallagher and I stop at has been sandwiched between two wooden braces a few feet away from its rectangular base. Both pieces were struck by a snowplow during the winter, and a few chips in the base form a scar that shines bright white against the old greenish-grey rock. Gallagher’s assistant, Steve Brown, is trying to glue the monument back together. “The whole stone used to be white like that. That’s an algae growing on it,” Gallagher says, pointing to the damage.
posted by CrystalDave at 11:25 PM - 29 comments

Senses of Cinema on two Jean-Pierre Melville classics

Senses of Cinema on two Jean-Pierre Melville classics: Temenuga Trifonova on Le Samouraï and Brian L. Frye on Bob le flambeur
posted by juv3nal at 11:22 PM - 4 comments

No malice is intended.

Presenting the 2015 Name of The Year Bracket
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 10:59 PM - 60 comments

submitted 2 months late, one letter grade off.

This State of the Union address will address the union about the state of the economy, foreign policy, and the general state of this country.
posted by So You're Saying These Are Pants? at 10:31 PM - 13 comments

Celebrating 50 magic tapes with The Magician

The Magician was initially a mysterious mixer who released Magic Tapes, mixes of disco, house and pop without tracklists, challenging listeners to compile tracklists themselves, and they did. But he stepped out from behind the curtain, remixing Lykke Li's "I Follow Rivers" and later his debut single, "I Don't Know What To Do" feat. Jeppe. In 2013, he signed with Parlophone, but has continued making his Magic Tapes. Last month, he celebrated his 50th mix with Mixmag TV and Arches. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief at 7:47 PM - 3 comments

Quies Custodiet Ipsos Custards?

Via a freedom of information act request, Ars Technica acquired 4.6 million license plate scans from the Oakland Police Department. The scans cover 1.1 million unique license plates, and only 0.2% of them were associated with any criminal activity. [more inside]
posted by jenkinsEar at 7:40 PM - 51 comments

This moonbase condo had a much better view in the brochure!

Always dreamed of living in a moon base, with a view of Earth and the stars out your bedroom window? Well, you may end up living in underground lava tube instead. The moon's lower gravity means that lava tubes wider than a kilometer could remain structurally stable there.
posted by Blue Jello Elf at 3:50 PM - 42 comments

“I tend to think it happened. In fact, I’m damn sure it happened.”

What Lies Beneath
In the 1960s, hundreds of pounds of uranium went missing in Pennsylvania. Is it buried in the ground, poisoning locals—or did Israel steal it to build the bomb?
posted by andoatnp at 3:21 PM - 30 comments

Chuckles

Kitties in Chains’ “Cat in the Box”
posted by josher71 at 3:00 PM - 6 comments

But you do not have to shoot to be morally responsible.

"This week I may be jailed for writing a book on human rights abuses." by Rafael Marques de Morais [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 1:56 PM - 15 comments

This is an environment of welcoming and you should just get the hell out

Adapted and developed by Greg Daniels for NBC, the American version of The Office debuted on March 24, 2005, and viewers and critics were intrigued from the start. More than 11 million people tuned in to watch the remake of the British series’ pilot, and it was met with negative reviews from critics who were disappointed that it seemed like a cheap carbon copy. The following week, though, Daniels’ series proved that it could and ultimately would shine on its own, as the episode “Diversity Day” introduced us to the real Michael Scott, and how this horribly awkward goon of a Dunder Mifflin boss would affect the lives of his poor office drones.
posted by Chrysostom at 1:44 PM - 40 comments

The end of NFL blackouts

Last fall, the FCC voted unanimously to eliminate its own sports blackout rule. At this week's NFL annual meeting, the league approved a suspension of the rule. The blackout rule, which came into effect if a game was not sold out 72 hours prior to kickoff, was enacted in the '70s in order to prevent cable companies from airing events broadcast on local stations. [more inside]
posted by everybody had matching towels at 1:28 PM - 34 comments

We sure as shellac knew what the polar bear was doing on the island

Javier Grillo-Marxuach [prev: 1 2 3], a writer on the first two seasons of Lost [prev: 1 2 3 4], attempts to answer the question “Did we know what we were doing, or were we just making it up as we went along?” Much like the TV series itself, the answer turns out to be much more complicated than it seems. [A 17,000-word memoir].
posted by 1970s Antihero at 1:15 PM - 94 comments

DOMAIN OF PRIME FROG

"This blog is dedicated to discussing games where you play as a frog, but it might also talk about games which just have heavy frog presence in them. The borders are unclear and the road ahead is hazy. Come with me on the journey to be a frog."
♥FROG WORLD♥
posted by JHarris at 12:09 PM - 45 comments

My First Life as a Nurse

I am in my first month of nursing school. It is the early 70s and this is a three-year program, hospital-based, all practical training. It is my first day in my first ward...
A remembrance, by English professor and disability studies scholar, Janet Lyon.
posted by Toekneesan at 11:05 AM - 15 comments

Star Wars space battles the way they should have been, 1980s style

This really amazing 7-minute Star Wars animated short, in the style of 1980s anime like Macross, shows a space battle where the Empire are the good guys taking on a squadron of dasterdly rebels. Enjoy missile trails, awesome sudden close-ups, totally radical explosions, split screens of attractive TIE fighter pilots, and a vaguely annoying anime-inspired soundtrack. This PDF shows how it was all made and introduces you to the characters, along with some neat concept sketches.
posted by blahblahblah at 10:59 AM - 65 comments

Is genetic reductionism shaping our identity?

"What would it mean to live in a society where people seek only the significant same." Reductionist discourses tend to infiltrate both genetic and big data enterprises. Could these discourses imperceptibly close rather than open the prospect for us to decide what we want to become—what we want our futures to be? Could such discourses also “hide rather than reveal the deepest sources of social ills,” which shape the evolution of our genes and identities?
posted by pmfail at 10:27 AM - 9 comments

They can't take away the X-Files, Scully. They tried.

In more "the 90s really are back" news, Fox has just officially announced it has placed a order for a new, six-episode limited series of The X-Files. Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny will be reprising their roles.
posted by entropicamericana at 10:25 AM - 172 comments

Life as a Modern Shepherd

James Rebanks has written a memoir , The Shepherd's Life, about running his family farm in England's Lake District, "[T]hat teacher’s idea of the Lake District was created by an urbanised and increasingly industrialised society, over the past 200 years. It was a dream of a place for a wider society that was full of people disconnected from the land. That dream was never for us, the people who work this land. We were already here doing what we do. I wanted to tell her that she had it all wrong – she didn’t really know this place or its people at all. These thoughts took years to become clear, but in a rough childish form I think they were there from the start. But in that assembly in 1987 I was dumb and 13, so I just made a farting noise on my hand, and everyone laughed. [more inside]
posted by gladly at 10:19 AM - 7 comments

"...clinical-sounding terms like adipose, overweight, and obese."

How Obesity Became a Disease [The Atlantic] And, as a consequence, how weight loss became an industry.
posted by Fizz at 10:02 AM - 63 comments

Huggability seems to be a plus

What the "perfect" man looks like, according to men and women
So, according to almost every movie ever, we’re supposed to be most attracted to beefy men with glistening muscles, smoky (and kinda dangerous) eyes that make us feel like they suspect our very darkest, deepest secrets, and thighs that look like they’ve been subjected to Olympic training. Examples of these “idealized” men include (but are totally not limited to, obvs) Brad Pitt, Chris Hemsworth, Will Smith, and Jason Mamoa. In the end, it turns out the ideal dude isn’t Brad, Chris, Will, OR Jason. It’s the “Boy Next Door.”
[more inside]
posted by Lexica at 9:47 AM - 128 comments

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