April 14

Dennis Cooper's Zac's Haunted House

Zac's Haunted House, the latest by Dennis Cooper, is a free HTML horror novel consisting entirely of animated GIFs. Notre Dame English professor Joyelle McSweeney discusses the book with Mr. Cooper.
posted by Rykey at 9:23 PM - 9 comments

Happiness, American style.

Study reveals Unhappiest (and Happiest) Cities in the U.S. “Our research indicates that people care about more than happiness alone, so other factors may encourage them to stay in a city despite their unhappiness,” says Gottlieb. “This means that researchers and policy-makers should not consider an increase in reported happiness as an overriding objective.” [more inside]
posted by storybored at 8:45 PM - 51 comments

Hello cat, you're a terrifying nightmare

Have you ever thought your life would be better if it included a giant, realistic felted cat head mask? If so, you would be correct.
posted by jeather at 8:27 PM - 35 comments

Sailors and Daughters: Early photography and the Indian Ocean

Sailors and Daughters reveals the expansive maritime societies of Zanzibar, the east African coast, and beyond. From the 1840s, cameras traced the international migrations of traders, sailors, sons, and daughters through Indian Ocean ports, continuing trade that dates back over five millennia.
posted by bardophile at 7:33 PM - 9 comments

Mmm, web fruit

Fruits of the Web is a blog that takes the often clunky and goofy world of scientific modeling out of context, reveling in the surreal effects of block men ironing, masks of points, and skeletons shoveling. Thankfully, they also tend to post source articles and videos so you can find out just why someone would make something like that. They also post other web ephemera, like strange Easter gifs and whatnot. Overall, just a nice little cornucopia of oddities. Occasionally slightly not work safe.
posted by codacorolla at 7:06 PM - 11 comments

The Struggle Between Pain and Not

The Butterfly Child is a short documentary about Jonathan Pitre, a fourteen year old with Epidermolysis Bullosa, a rare skin disorder (NSFW).
posted by Lutoslawski at 5:31 PM - 23 comments

What is a sandwich?

A Field Guide to the American Sandwich, with introduction. Both by Sam Sifton. Possibly related to yesterday's ode to the BEC and last week's roast beef tutorial (all NYT).
posted by xowie at 2:19 PM - 113 comments

The glorious history and inevitable decline of one of technology’s great

IEEE Spectrum has published a "Special Report: 50 Years of Moore's Law," with a selection of a dozen short articles looking back at Moore's original formulation of the law, how it has developed over time, and prospects for the law continuing. Here are some highlights.
posted by infini at 1:17 PM - 32 comments

Golden Meaning

Graphic artists depict the golden ratio – in pictures [more inside]
posted by chavenet at 12:59 PM - 28 comments

'This propensity for tone-deaf stories about people of vast wealth'

Having trouble finding the right condo? Moving from colleting art to collecting passports? Feeling left behind in yacht purchases? Or are you having to budget your 500k a year? (previously) Or worried about pied-a-terre owners changing your neighborhood?
Or maybe the Times coverage of the super-rich is alienating millennials. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 12:42 PM - 94 comments

"Cowabunga dudes!!"

'F*cking Young' by Tyler, The Creator [YouTube] [Contains NSFW Lyrics] Rapper Tyler, The Creator, a member of LA hip-hop collective Odd Future alongside Frank Ocean and Earl Sweatshirt, has unveiled a video from his newly-released album Cherry Bomb. Full stream available via Spotify.
posted by Fizz at 12:36 PM - 5 comments

Civilization 2.0: Now With More Briquettes

So, the apocalypse happens, in whatever flavor you prefer, and eventually our descendants (or the cockroaches') are poised to inherit the earth. Lucky for them, we've left a nice cache of information for them (previously on the Blue) so that they don't have to reinvent the wheel or Pokemon or whatever. Question is, will they be able to do that--or, rather, how difficult would it be to do that--if we use up all the fossil fuels first? [more inside]
posted by Halloween Jack at 12:10 PM - 25 comments

Comic Book Artist Herb Trimpe Dies at Age 75

Herb Trimpe, long time artist on The Incredible Hulk, died yesterday at the age of 75. In addition to his seven year run on the Hulk, Trimpe drew the first issues of Marvel's G.I. Joe comic and was the artist on the first appearance of Wolverine. Trimpe attended the School of Visual Arts and began his career inking backgrounds for Dell Comics. After serving in the United State Air Force, Trimpe began his long career with Marvel Comics in 1967 making his debut in Kid Colt Outlaw #134. He penciled The Incredible Hulk in a nearly unbroken run from 1968 - 1972. In May 2014, the original art page by Trimpe featuring the first appearance of Wolverine sold for a record $657,250.00.
posted by marxchivist at 11:51 AM - 18 comments

Salt in soil from bygone era may be keeping briney water on Mars liquid

Mars might have liquid water, according to new findings We know Mars has water, and we also know that Mars once had liquid water (a whole ocean, in fact) but now it seems we may have evidence of liquid water today. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California at 10:53 AM - 22 comments

Women in STEM fields

An empirical study by Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci at Cornell University found that when using identical qualifications, but changing the sex of the applicant, "women candidates are favored 2 to 1 over men for tenure-track positions in the science, technology, engineering and math fields." [more inside]
posted by jeffburdges at 10:47 AM - 63 comments

When Is Cheryl’s Birthday?

How would you fare in a room full of adolescent math competitors in Singapore? [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 10:32 AM - 76 comments

(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

Tableflip Dot Club: 2015's coolest club is for all those women in tech who had feelings about Ellen Pao & more.
posted by dame at 10:02 AM - 48 comments

"It's pretty black and white. They didn't do their job."

"If his name was John Brown, he would have been in jail," one criminal justice official with knowledge of the case said. "If a woman says, 'He's the guy that raped me,' and you have corroborating evidence to show they were together and she went to the hospital and she can identify him, that guy goes to jail."
Last week, ProPublica and the New Orleans Advocate published the results of their months-long joint investigation outlining how law enforcement officers in five states repeatedly (and sometimes deliberately) failed to apprehend former NFL star Darren Sharper as he traveled cross-country drugging and raping women: Upon Further Review.

[cw: rape, sexual assault, violent misogyny, law enforcement collusion to cover up same] [more inside]
posted by divined by radio at 9:59 AM - 23 comments

The Richer and the Poorer

The Washington Post reports what the rich and poor actually spend their money on, and where [more inside]
posted by ourt at 9:47 AM - 52 comments

He could do no wrong.

Soul legend Percy Sledge has passed away at his home in Baton Rouge. Best known for "When a Man Loves a Woman," Sledge started out as a nurse, booking gigs when he could on weekends. Thanks to hits like "Warm and Tender Love," "It Tears Me Up," and "Take Time to Know Her", and "I'll Be Your Everything", Sledge would eventually leave his job at the hospital and go on to enjoy a career that spanned six decades. He was 73.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 9:42 AM - 23 comments

"I don't make mistakes."

Hans Kühner, of G. Henle Verlag, a publisher of classical music urtexts, hypnotically engraves a sheet of Liszt the old-fashioned way.
posted by theodolite at 9:41 AM - 18 comments

The fundamental seductiveness of the conspiracy theory

In [Anatoly Fomenko's New Chronology] , the events of the New Testament precede those of the Old Testament—and in any case, most of the stories are concocted to reflect later incidents. Joan of Arc was a model for the biblical character Deborah. Jesus Christ was crucified in Constantinople in 1086. Ancient Egypt, Rome, and Greece were fashioned by Renaissance writers and artists (the time of the Pharoahs, Fomenko suggests, may have lasted into the 1700s). Aristotle instructed Alexander the Great, who was a tsar, in Moscow in the 1400s.
Is Ancient History Completely Made Up By 'The Man'? (Previously)
posted by griphus at 7:42 AM - 111 comments

1. Promise you'll give it back

Meet the Stanley Cup
posted by almostmanda at 7:41 AM - 61 comments

With their tiny magical butts.

Did you know that wombats poop in cube shape? It's true. But why? And...how? Here's an explanation, complete with a wombat digestive tract model and jello poops. [more inside]
posted by phunniemee at 6:52 AM - 31 comments

Exploring Auto Racing

David Clear constructs a map of the virtual space of the Intellivision classic Auto Racing, which features each track beside the other. It's part of the Intellivision Flashback game set.
posted by juiceCake at 6:31 AM - 12 comments

Cougar Town

At first, they tried to provoke the cougar by poking it with a long prod but all they managed to do was to lose the GoPro camera attached to the prod which at one point fell off. Mountain lion hiding under L.A. home can’t be forced out.
posted by hippybear at 3:04 AM - 72 comments

Corn Flakes: "immortal and lifeless"

"The Corn Flakes trade-off - in which nutrition is sacrificed for convenience, portability, and profitability - is a metonym for food production during the last century." The weird, wonderful story behind Corn Flakes.
posted by paleyellowwithorange at 1:51 AM - 34 comments

April 13

Tiny hamster's tiny date

Who says romance is dead? SLYT. Previously. And also hot dog eating contest and Thanksgiving. I missed some.
posted by Athanassiel at 9:49 PM - 17 comments

This kid's got style!

Celles et Ceux des Cimes et Cieux A graduation film by Gwenn Germain is a delightful, breath-taking homage to Miyazaki, Mœbius, and Syd Mead.
posted by cleroy at 9:01 PM - 15 comments

Seventy thousand reasons to be less unhappy

Entrepreneur sets $70,000 year minimum wage for all his employees Dan Price, the owner of a credit card processing company, came across an article showing that making much less than $75,000/yr. greatly diminished the emotional well-being of earners, and decided to do something about it. He's embarked on a three year plan to increase the salaries of all employees making under $70,000, which for some of them will be double their current wages.
posted by xigxag at 8:31 PM - 129 comments

You promised to kiss me on Friday. It's Friday now.

Though nowadays somewhat stereotyped as being massive group dance numbers in traditional dress, Bollywood musical sequences have tended to follow the fashions of Hollywood. Though from 1957, this Marx Brothers influenced Ina Mina Dika shows a 30s/40s aesthetic. The James Bond influenced Baithe Hain Kya Uska Paas is the spirit of the jet age. Disco is taken on with Jab Chhaye.
When Hollywood films stopped having musical numbers, music videos became the main influence. Take a little Michael Jackson and a little Madonna and see what Bollywood does with it.
posted by Peregrine Pickle at 8:00 PM - 7 comments

The Epic Story of Orson Welles’s Unfinished Masterpiece

The Other Side of the Wind was going to be Orson Welles’s comeback, perhaps even topping Citizen Kane—but to this day, it remains unfinished (though that may change soon). In an adaptation from a new book about the 45-year struggle to make the film, Josh Karp reveals why Welles’s last movie is the stuff of legend.(via)
posted by octothorpe at 4:45 PM - 6 comments

Following in the tradition of Eric Idle and... um, Clint Black.

Stephen Hawking performs Monty Python's "The Galaxy Song". The AV Club has the backstory.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 4:24 PM - 13 comments

"His mother was an ice-cold wind; his pa a fiery rock."

The Highwayman (1987-88) was a 60-minute sci-fi/action tv series from Glen A. Larson starring Sam J. Jones (1980's Flash Gordon). Jones played a federal marshall with a high-tech 18-wheeler "supertruck" that had advanced weaponry, the ability to turn invisible and a cab that turned into a helicopter. He patrolled America's highways and fought crime in the futuristic world of... 1992. A pilot movie, Terror on the Blacktop (starring Claudia Christian, G. Gordon Liddy, Jimmy Smits and Rowdy Roddy Piper) kicked off the series, which lasted nine episodes before driving off into the cancellation sunset. [more inside]
posted by zarq at 3:51 PM - 54 comments

“Yes, but…”

"Second, it is a mistake to pit post-modernism and social constructivism against evolutionary psychology as though they are in an intellectual death match that only one side can win. This tribalistic, us-versus-them thinking isn't helpful to science. Much like partitioning the causes of human behavior into nurture versus nature or culture versus biology or learned versus innate, social constructivism versus evolutionary psychology is a false dichotomy that may feel intuitively correct but should not be utilized very often by serious scientists (exceptions include behavioral genetics studies)."
posted by huguini at 3:43 PM - 69 comments

House France writes to the Seven Kingdoms

The next king of Westeros gets governing advice from the (real, not a joke) French governement in order to build a "stronger, fairer kingdom". House France's sigil is a rooster. The text is in French so here's a quick & dirty summary: 1) Less centralization and a more efficient territorial organization 2) Less tournaments and feasts and a responsible Master of Coin 3) A well-deserved and early retirement plan for the hard-working brothers of the Night's Watch 4) A fairer justice with no death penalty or trial by combat 5) No more youngster without education 6) Winter is coming! Let's build shelters for the poorest. [more inside]
posted by elgilito at 2:45 PM - 26 comments

The Man Camp AKA The Profit Center

"Post Hurricane Katrina, a whole new American dream was designed for some [South Asian] Indians — how to get trapped in a guarded labor camp by an American company".
posted by ursus_comiter at 2:22 PM - 12 comments

Dumb Ways To Die in Westeros

Dumb Ways To Die in Westeros (warning: spoilers for all four GoT seasons)
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 1:53 PM - 7 comments

Midnight Modernism

Evocative photos of Palm Springs houses by moonlight.
posted by Foci for Analysis at 1:20 PM - 6 comments

Guaranteed puppy free

For her 85th birthday, BBC Radio 4 has broadcast a new interview with and documentary about Ursula K. Le Guin, as well as the first radio dramatisation of The Left Hand of Darkness and a a new Earthsea serial coming soon.
posted by MartinWisse at 12:28 PM - 13 comments

Northampton, Northampton, Northhampton

Energy in Northampton! (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by Gilgongo at 11:59 AM - 12 comments

Three people who've never been in my kitchen

This Tuesday through Thursday (April 14th to 16th) is the latest Jeopardy! online contestant test. Are you ready? [more inside]
posted by kagredon at 11:47 AM - 49 comments

Girl Guides In War

Girl Guides, known in the US as Girl Scouts, are an organization for young girls founded in 1910. Almost from the beginning they were involved in wartime efforts. British Girl Guides served in World War I as spies for MI5. They also served both covertly and openly during World War II as Resistance members, medical staff, and support staff for refugees. Some of these were part of Guide troops which were stationed in invaded territories, such as Polish members who organized anti-Nazi propaganda efforts and smuggled Jewish children to safety. Others were volunteers who came from the UK to bring medical aid and supplies to care for refugees.
posted by sciatrix at 11:28 AM - 14 comments

Community Veterinary Outreach: supporting homeless people and their pets

The most common question I get asked is, "Should homeless people have pets?" And my response is always, "Should we have people who are homeless?" Ottawa veterinarian Michelle Lem talks about the Community Veterinary Outreach program and its model of community medicine for people and pets. At CVO, volunteer veterinarians, vet techs, social workers and public health nurses work together to connect with marginalized people by providing free veterinary care for their beloved pets. You can watch a brief timelapse video of a day in the life at the busy mobile clinic. [more inside]
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 11:28 AM - 20 comments

Timeless VHS

Today's TV and movies as 80s VHS covers. Worth it for the Breaking Bad one alone.
posted by colie at 11:19 AM - 8 comments

"History never really says goodbye. History says, 'See you later.'"

Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayan chronicler of Latin American history, politics, and football, has died at the age of 74 today in his hometown, Montevideo. [more inside]
posted by maskd at 10:48 AM - 20 comments

"...when CPS gets a call, we have to follow up on every single one."

In December, the Meitiv family, advocates of "free-range" parenting, were investigated for allowing their children to walk home from a park in Silver Spring, MD (previously). Yesterday, they again allowed their children to play in a nearby park. When the 6- and 10-year-old kids didn't arrive home at 6 pm as planned, their parents went looking for them. Two hours later, they received a call from Child Protective Services, who taken custody of the children after "a concerned resident" notified the police. Additional reporting and commentary from Washington Post columnist Petula Dvorak.
posted by Mr.Know-it-some at 10:34 AM - 231 comments

Talking about the patriarchy tends to have a slightly terrifying effect.

The Women I Pretend to Be, by novelist and game writer Naomi Alderman (previously):
No one in tech has ever been as sexist toward me as teachers and rabbis before I was 12 years old. But I've come to notice more and more how working within the particular masculine sexism of the tech industry has nudged the way I present myself, just a little. I've noticed how, very slowly, I've started to acquiesce into playing roles that get assigned to me. I've noticed how I disappear behind these masks.

What follows is not a horror story. It's a series of moments.
posted by divined by radio at 9:30 AM - 28 comments

♬… C a t h e r i n e … ♩♪

Catherine: A Story in Twelve Parts is a short video series by actress/comedian Jenny Slate (previously) and her husband, director Dean Fleischer-Camp. It has been described as "banal," "sincere," and "menacing." [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator at 9:27 AM - 17 comments

The Three Gandalfs

50 photos of costumed cast and crew on break, between takes or shooting SFX.
posted by griphus at 6:58 AM - 45 comments

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