At 20 a little coquette, at 40 not married yet, at 50 a suffragette!
December 19, 2014 7:04 PM   Subscribe

 
Damn.

"She'd wear pants in the street to make her complete, but she knows the law won't stand for that"

Kinda makes you wonder where we'll be a hundred years from now, looking back on today.
posted by Itaxpica at 7:08 PM on December 19, 2014 [19 favorites]


I would like all of these to put around everywhere.

They are THE BEST. (Not a jot of sarcasm. I wish they had the cat suffragette one, tho.)
posted by Kitteh at 7:10 PM on December 19, 2014


Also: isn't it amazing how terrified these men were that women would start treating them the exact same way they treated women?
posted by Itaxpica at 7:11 PM on December 19, 2014 [122 favorites]


AIN'T GIVE A DAMN
posted by Madamina at 7:14 PM on December 19, 2014 [45 favorites]


Previously.
posted by Horace Rumpole at 7:18 PM on December 19, 2014 [1 favorite]


I like how The Masculine Woman is clearly a limerick written by a copywriter who has heard a limerick described but had never before tried to write one.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 7:19 PM on December 19, 2014 [11 favorites]


This poster refers to the force-feeding of hunger striking suffragettes in the UK in 1913.

The "ICWT" on the box she's being held down with is a reference to the International Council of Women, the first international women's rights organization.
posted by ryanshepard at 7:21 PM on December 19, 2014 [28 favorites]


I'm reminded of anti gay marriage blowhards who like to grin and make snide remarks about the looks of lesbians. Pin headed pricks don't change much in a hundred years.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 7:22 PM on December 19, 2014 [19 favorites]


What this proves is that it was really all about ethics in Universal Suffrage
posted by surazal at 7:24 PM on December 19, 2014 [25 favorites]


It's like a look into Rush Limbaugh's brain.
posted by Saxon Kane at 7:25 PM on December 19, 2014 [6 favorites]


Also: Why is Little Timmy just a disembodied head laying on a pillow?
posted by Saxon Kane at 7:26 PM on December 19, 2014 [1 favorite]


The "ICWT" on the box she's being held down with is a reference to the International Council of Women, the first international women's rights organization.

Actually, I might be wrong about this - the Transactions of ICW was the organization's main publication, and typically abbreviated as "ICWT". I've also seen a few sources that suggest it may stand for, "in corruption we trust", a reference to misogynist politicians that resisted voting rights for women, however.
posted by ryanshepard at 7:34 PM on December 19, 2014


Mean army man, can't afford a ticket....
posted by jonmc at 7:34 PM on December 19, 2014 [2 favorites]


The rhetoric of "feminists are ugly man haters" has changed remarkably little in over a hundred years.
posted by CarolynG at 7:43 PM on December 19, 2014 [62 favorites]




The difference is that now that's something teenage girls believe as well.
posted by flabdablet at 7:46 PM on December 19, 2014 [4 favorites]


CarolynG, that was my takeaway. In the year of Gamergate, I feel like I've pretty much seen each and every one of these tactics trotted out again. So "what will it look like in 100 years?" I can't be sure, and I'd like to be more optimistic, but I have a feeling these will be recycled again in 100 years.
posted by Miko at 7:46 PM on December 19, 2014 [10 favorites]


Amazing!!!!!!!!!
posted by ChuraChura at 7:50 PM on December 19, 2014 [2 favorites]


Kinda makes you wonder where we'll be a hundred years from now, looking back on today.

Dead, unfortunately.
posted by Behemoth at 8:01 PM on December 19, 2014 [35 favorites]


The rhetoric of "feminists are ugly man haters" has changed remarkably little in over a hundred years.


No indeed. In Intolerance (1916), there is a title card which -- despite not having seen the movie in decades, I can recall word-for-word: "When women cease to attract men, they often turn to reform as a second option." I saw Intolerancein an undergrad film course. You can imagine the whoops of disdain that caused.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 8:10 PM on December 19, 2014 [4 favorites]


That mustache dad is pretty cool actually.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 8:14 PM on December 19, 2014 [1 favorite]


I get that a vanguard of us whoops in disdain. at the same time, you are a couple clicks away from image macros containing virtually the same content. Angry feminists are angry because they can't get laid. The trope is alive and well.
posted by Miko at 8:16 PM on December 19, 2014 [14 favorites]


I find the PUNCH poster astonishing. Did they really have so little self-awareness that this "criticism" of women acting like men that they did not realize that this is a commentary about men?
posted by SPrintF at 8:21 PM on December 19, 2014 [27 favorites]


Second wanting posters of these for my walls. That feminist bar looks chill as hell.
posted by Solon and Thanks at 8:30 PM on December 19, 2014 [19 favorites]


Agree about the bar.

As for the Punch cartoon - the dominant people - editors of magazines, wealthy readers - definitely didn't see it as a commentary about men. They saw it as a commentary about a totally upended social order, mayhem, misrule, a cats-marrying-dogs-level of craziness. Women were supposed to occupy that role and do that work; men, definitely not, ridiculous to suggst. It was repulsive just to imagine such an inside-out social order. We're only able to see it now after 150 years of feminist questioning of that paradigm.
posted by Miko at 8:34 PM on December 19, 2014 [16 favorites]


I love anti-suffragist propaganda! It paints a prettier world that you're just supposed to somehow know is a bad thing.

Great example- "I'm a catty suffragette" is plainly meant to be insulting, but it's a kitty who supports women's suffrage and declares her intention to fight for her rights! What could I possibly object to?
posted by Pope Guilty at 8:40 PM on December 19, 2014 [32 favorites]


"The fear that gay men women will treat you the way you treat women."
posted by Seiten Taisei at 8:40 PM on December 19, 2014 [18 favorites]


These posters reminded me of how little I know about the suffrage movement--just a few names and dates from high school history classes, I guess--and in my mind they raised the question of just who exactly were the holdouts, at least in the US where I vaguely understand the general political territory.

One search later, I was like, "Oh, duh. Racists in the South." But since that was sort of a thin source, I looked further and stumbled on the riveting, nail-biting story of how the politics played out in the last state needed for ratification: Tennessee. The racism angle is mentioned as a key issue for anti-suffragists on p. 446, but wow, read more than that. The whole chapter is very compelling reading.

The book is Woman suffrage and politics; the inner story of the suffrage movement by Carrie Chapman Catt and Nettie Rogers Shuler.
posted by Monsieur Caution at 8:46 PM on December 19, 2014 [18 favorites]


I steal the reference from a Belle & Sebastian song, but should I ever have a plane, it shall be named "The Screaming Suffragette," because that is badass and inspiring.
posted by Navelgazer at 8:48 PM on December 19, 2014 [2 favorites]


The suffragette Madonna one is great. Well, awful, but in an interesting way.

And yes, it is striking how consistent the insults have remained.
posted by Dip Flash at 8:48 PM on December 19, 2014 [1 favorite]


The "ICWT" on the box she's being held down with is a reference to the International Council of Women, the first international women's rights organization.

And is also a pun on 1 Hundredweight (abbreviated CWT) equal to 100 pounds.
posted by Zedcaster at 9:09 PM on December 19, 2014 [9 favorites]


Kinda makes you wonder where we'll be a hundred years from now, looking back on today.

Well, women will still have the dang vote!
posted by mattoxic at 9:10 PM on December 19, 2014


"She'd wear pants in the street to make her complete, but she knows the law won't stand for that"

And it was of course utterly inconceivable that there was anything wrong about such a law to begin with - not surprising, after all, women had to fight for the right to wear pants in court, for example - I even made an FPP to that effect. And that was 1938. The timeline of women getting the right to vote is quite interesting.

The arguments and mockery are equally enduring and recapitulated every time civil rights are fought over. One can hear the echoes of such arguments since time immemorial, and mindlessly recapitulated today by the same depressing conservative voices. Remarkable how little humanity appears to learn from history.
posted by VikingSword at 9:24 PM on December 19, 2014 [4 favorites]


For that matter, just how little people learn can be seen from the comments in the FPP, example:

"Josh Morris · New Holland, Pennsylvania
Eva Verheij Fear is the wrong word to use, you're really not at all threatening, we just recognize the myriad of negative social effects that women's "liberation" brings."

The mind boggles.
posted by VikingSword at 9:28 PM on December 19, 2014


Also: isn't it amazing how terrified these men were that women would start treating them the exact same way they treated women?


some of these are so outrageous I wonder if these were drawn almost satirically or ironically, by artists who actually supported equal rights.

Like I look at the Suffragette Madonna, or "My Wife's Joined the Suffrage Movement", or the "When Women Vote", or "I Want to Vote but My Wife Won't Let Me", I wonder if these were the works of the Stephen Colberts or John Stewarts of the turn of the century, in these cases, to make men realize the folly of their mindset.

As for the hundred years question, I think in a hundred years, we'll probably shudder at the way we treated animals for food (don't worry, I'll still be around then).
posted by bitteroldman at 9:39 PM on December 19, 2014 [8 favorites]


Kinda makes you wonder where we'll be a hundred years from now, looking back on today.

standing atop a pile of manskulls wielding a broadsword named miffy, ideally
posted by poffin boffin at 9:47 PM on December 19, 2014 [60 favorites]


Right on Boldman. Our present day prejudices will seem awful and absurd. Maybe some of these were satire, I'd say the ones with good art direction are the "most" likely candidates.

As for progress, once we have as many corrupt female politicians as corrupt male politicians then we can move onto the next order of business.
posted by vicx at 9:53 PM on December 19, 2014


Here we are a hundred years later and there are still plenty of men expressing these sentiments, or worse, on Reddit and elsewhere. So a hundred years from now, I expect a fair number of idiots clogging up the holo-vids saying more or less what they've always said.

The pants thing is a little funny to me. Growing up in a very fundie church, and being sent to an extremely conservative school, pants on women was forbidden in those two places as recently as the mid 80's.

Well, semi-forbidden in the church. My mum was one of those weird people who was both fundamentalist Christian and deeply feminist. She respected the pastor's wishes about pants on Sunday morning. Wore trousers for the Sunday night and Wednesday night meetings without a regret and smiling at the pastor every time he gave her a dirty look.
posted by honestcoyote at 12:00 AM on December 20, 2014 [11 favorites]


It's kind of funny how the 'horrible' things they imagined were men living.. women's lives.
posted by DriftingLotus at 12:34 AM on December 20, 2014 [29 favorites]


In the "Everybody Works" poster towards the bottom, I'll note thst neither the baby nor the cat appear to be working. Who is this "everybody," and who cross-stitched that sentiment?
posted by GenjiandProust at 3:11 AM on December 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


I have to say that I think my favorite part of all this is that the "She'd wear pants in the street" has a little inset picture of some pants.

In case you'd forgotten what they were, I guess.
posted by nicolas.bray at 3:16 AM on December 20, 2014 [15 favorites]


I even made an FPP to that effect. And that was 1938. 

Wow. The Metafilter site is older than I thought!
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 3:41 AM on December 20, 2014 [13 favorites]


Good thing sexism and racism are just relics of the distant past.
posted by Obscure Reference at 5:00 AM on December 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


I want to use this to illustrate the concept of privilege distress every time the topic comes up, in case anyone tries to deny that it's a real thing.
posted by OnceUponATime at 5:41 AM on December 20, 2014 [16 favorites]


at the same time, you are a couple clicks away from image macros containing virtually the same content.

But today macros depicting men as evil, hideous creatures are just as readily available. So progress?
posted by 0 at 5:50 AM on December 20, 2014


Yeah, people still say these things, but at least they're not published in newspapers anymore.
posted by Peevish at 6:00 AM on December 20, 2014


But today macros depicting men as evil, hideous creatures are just as readily available.

Eh, I think that's a false equivalence at best. They are "just as readily available" if you mean "they are both on the same internet", but in terms of sheer volume, I'm fairly certain the feminist-hating macros win out over the radfem misandrist macros hands down.

Also, I think Miko's larger point was that the depiction of women fighting for equal rights as being man-hating, rolling-pin wielding monsters has been used in numerous contexts over time. From wanting to vote, to wanting to criticize video games.
posted by Aya Hirano on the Astral Plane at 6:02 AM on December 20, 2014 [13 favorites]


I bought a copy of that first poster (the one of the bar) for my sister for Christmas. I am so excited to give it to her, I think she'll love it. It doesn't appear to be available from the site I purchased it from (although there's more info about that particular poster) any more. :(
posted by quaking fajita at 6:02 AM on December 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


I notice how the posters impugn the manhood of anyone with a suffragette wife. Why a real man wouldn't stand for it!
posted by SyraCarol at 6:25 AM on December 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


> "... although there's more info about that particular poster ..."

"A dark future of complimentary fudge and almonds." Heh.
posted by kyrademon at 6:37 AM on December 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


I wonder if these were the works of the Stephen Colberts or John Stewarts of the turn of the century, in these cases, to make men realize the folly of their mindset.

I don't think so. At best, I think they reflect a bemused detachment at how crazy society is in general, kind of like a New Yorker cover - topical, but ambiguously editorial. But since I'm familiar with some of the text sources from the period, I can say that ironic stances were not something often found in the mainstream media, unless they were cut-and-pasted from some suffragists' polemical speech in order to be further mocked. After all, this was a cause in which women were eventually imprisoned and (essentially) bodily tortured in the United States; a "lighten up, boys!" mindset isn't often present around the discourse. The effrontery of women in asking for political and personal power, and the resulting and inevitable feminization of men, were the ridiculous and funny things to the mainstream.
posted by Miko at 6:41 AM on December 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


I did wish I could find original context for some of those images, though, to help support that viewpoint. I know a bunch of them are from Puck, and some of those are scanned and available online.
posted by Miko at 6:45 AM on December 20, 2014


In a lot of places - especially Latin America and Continental Europe - progressive parties were violently opposed to giving women the vote (and conservative parties favored it) because "everyone knew" women were naturally conservative and more easily influenced by religion and would vote with the right-wing, clerical parties. IMAGINE THEIR SHOCK.

When my mom started college in the late 1960s, she had to wear skirts to class, but in a large victory, women had just won the concession that they could wear slacks to the dining hall.

I wasn't allowed to wear pants to church until the 90s, not because Catholicism cared, but because my otherwise pretty feminist grandfather (who laughed at one of his daughter's suitors who asked permission to marry her because he thought that was so outdated and backward) HATED pants on women, and while he grudgingly accepted it in all other areas of life, he thought it was disrespectful to wear pants to church and looked slovenly. I still get a little uneasy when I wear pants to church on Christmas or Easter and he's been dead many years now. I won't actually wear pants to a funeral, I'm sure this is why. Attitudes persist in weird ways.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 6:51 AM on December 20, 2014 [13 favorites]


progressive parties were violently opposed to giving women the vote (and conservative parties favored it) because "everyone knew" women were naturally conservative and more easily influenced by religion and would vote with the right-wing, clerical parties

...and, not insignificantly, would vote to outlaw alcohol. Which happened.
posted by Miko at 6:54 AM on December 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


Of course, a huge reason women voted for Prohibition had to do with husbands drinking all the rent money...

Also? On my first visit to the site I was confronted by an ad for Spanx. Finally, a solution to all those floppy, unruly areas of the female body!
posted by allthinky at 7:16 AM on December 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


Oops, I linked the wrong article from privilege distress.
posted by OnceUponATime at 7:17 AM on December 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


Sadly all their darkest fears have come true. We're living in a feminist utopia and it's too late for all of us.

Oh, wait, nevermind...
posted by blue_beetle at 7:18 AM on December 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


Most of these were not posters but post cards, and the Punch cartoon was published in that magazine.
posted by Ideefixe at 7:33 AM on December 20, 2014


Of course, a huge reason women voted for Prohibition had to do with husbands drinking all the rent money...

Oh, absolutely, and it wasn't a stupid move. Women, especially women with children, weren't economically empowered, making them critically dependent on the functional abilities of the men in their life. For those who ended up married to problem drinkers, there were serious difficulties. Their families weren't safe or secure, their health and nutrition suffered, and there wasn't much many of them were able to do about it. The only real issue with Prohibition is that the women who supported it were after the wrong enemy. Their problem wasn't drink, it was the patriarchy upon which they had been rendered utterly dependent. Their opposition to drink wasn't mere prudishness, it was a battle for survival.

I also just remembered that fear of suffrage was also linked to fear of Catholicism and of social dominance by immigrants from Southern Europe and Ireland. Women would certainly vote with the bishops.

Oops, I linked the wrong article from privilege distress.

The one you posted was still good!

Most of these were not posters but post cards, and the Punch cartoon was published in that magazine

Have you found them somewhere with some contextual information associated? Would love to see them if so.
posted by Miko at 8:12 AM on December 20, 2014 [9 favorites]


The bar cartoon, "Why Not Go the Limit?" appeared in Puck, the American humor magazine, not Punch, which was published from London.

It is about a world turned upside-down, but look at the details (here's a big copy, but slightly shadowed). Yes, it's a bar, yes, they're smoking, but look at the names on the walls--the bar belongs to a Mrs. Gilligan, the women reading the tickertape aren't looking at stocks, but at a blow-by-blow of the Mulligan-Slattery fight (reported via ticker! which, uh, whoa, cool), there's ads for an Evelyn Cassidy society and for Scrub-Lady's Delight-brand chaw. They're gambling, there's a Barney Gumble-acting drunk woman at the back of the bar, and the only thing they're reading is the police blotter (violent! shocking! devoid of morals or literary merit!). My favorite, the woman resentfully giving her kids some money to take care of themselves, could be a gender-flip of any prohibitionist cartoon or any moral-urban-novel setpiece of a dissolute and drunken Irish (or any other sort of Catholic, honestly) immigrant. These aren't just women behaving like men, these are women acting like the immigrants ruining America and diluting its WASPiness.

And all of this was already problematic as an element of men's universal suffrage in the United States--bars were key recruiting (and, sometimes, voting) spaces for radicals or, worse, Democrats among immigrant men, and this poster just transposes their bad foreignness onto women--the same way women were presented as being more pro-Rome voters.
posted by The Bridge on the River Kai Ryssdal at 8:15 AM on December 20, 2014 [19 favorites]


> And is also a pun on 1 Hundredweight (abbreviated CWT) equal to 100 pounds.

Lest you fear that the Imperial system ever be vaguely rational, 1 cwt is 112 lb, or 8 stone. Unless you're quaintly colonial, but one would never admit to that.

Maybe a slight derail into more positive Suffragette imagery, here's “The Suffragette that Knew Jiu-Jitsu. The Arrest.”. Yeah, Edith Margaret Garrud ftw!
posted by scruss at 8:29 AM on December 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


I think the Punch illustration was discussed here on MeFi a while back, and the tl;dr version is that the illustrators were not strangers to irony, and that it is likely that the illustration is meant to work on multiple levels; it's putatively a criticism of the suffrage movement, but is also a pretty pointed take at men's behavior as well.

Some of the other cartoons don't seem to have the same well-developed sense of irony.
posted by Kadin2048 at 8:49 AM on December 20, 2014


Finally, a solution to all those floppy, unruly areas of the female body!

A problem unknown before this rash of pants-wearing, I am sure.
posted by GenjiandProust at 9:11 AM on December 20, 2014


>>Finally, a solution to all those floppy, unruly areas of the female body!

A problem unknown before this rash of pants-wearing, I am sure.


Well, who could tell what was going on under all those layers of corset and bustle and petticoat! Could be anything from svelte to floppy to parasitic twins!
posted by Blue Jello Elf at 10:18 AM on December 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


That Harry Dart cartoon is actually about women smoking in public, which was of course linked to suffrage. The caption on the original is "For the benefit of those ladies who ask the right to smoke in public."

Harry Dart seems to have been fond of these sort of "world turned upside down" themes. Here's one where socialism has taken over, the wealthy are rioting in the street and being clubbed by the police, while a prominent socialist is horrified to discover his son has become a capitalist, and a woman, who looks much like a suffragette is encouraging wealthy men to unite and take over the world.

This one is good for those who were following that story about what the Toast pays writers. Newspaper writers and cartoonists have all joined labor unions like the "amalgamated muckrakers union" and "sob-sisters of the daily press" and are marching in the street.
posted by interplanetjanet at 11:18 AM on December 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


Oh, absolutely, and it wasn't a stupid move. Women, especially women with children, weren't economically empowered, making them critically dependent on the functional abilities of the men in their life. For those who ended up married to problem drinkers, there were serious difficulties. Their families weren't safe or secure, their health and nutrition suffered, and there wasn't much many of them were able to do about it.

I just realized I got most of my information about Prohibition from a romance set in that era, with a Prohibitionist as the heroine and a bar owner as the hero. It's less stellar on the racism front, but I am suddenly bemused at the path my knowledge took.

The novel also included the amount of physical abuse women and children received at the hands of men who drank as a reason for prohibition.
posted by Deoridhe at 1:15 PM on December 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


You know, I'm not saying that I don't understand why we chose to live in the particular dystopian future we currently inhabit, since it does come with neat things like computers and all, but ... when we made that decision, were we INFORMED about the feminist dystopia that came with free fudge?
posted by kyrademon at 1:25 PM on December 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


> Maybe a slight derail into more positive Suffragette imagery, here's “The Suffragette that Knew Jiu-Jitsu. The Arrest.”. Yeah, Edith Margaret Garrud ftw!

That is awesome.
posted by homunculus at 3:45 PM on December 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


I'm happy to know that I can buy the "Why not go the Limit" poster is sale as a wall poster. Now I know what to get my wife for Christmas.
posted by happyroach at 3:52 PM on December 20, 2014


only thing they're reading is the police blotter

Did you notice the woman reading the police blotter, casually lighting a cigar, is wearing a black mourning dress. Looks completely unworried and more than a little badass. There's a hell of a story there.

If I was a woman, or could pull off crossdressing effectively, I know what I'd be wearing next Halloween. Widows weeds, puffing on a big Cohiba, carrying around the tabloid describing the gruesome details of my husband's demise, and a big red circle drawn around the paragraph stating police are baffled and no suspects are immediately apparent.
posted by honestcoyote at 4:25 PM on December 20, 2014 [7 favorites]


I'm glad they put the suffragists attacking the policemen next to the force-feeding image, but they should have shown the force-feeding first.
posted by immlass at 5:50 PM on December 20, 2014


Punch 1878:
RIGHTS OR WRONGS?

(The Diary of a Female of the Future.)


Monday. — Just as I had settled my household work for the day I was called away to serve on a Jury, and had to remain in the Law Courts until the evening.

Tuesday. — Some riots having taken place in our neighbourhood, was forced to act as a Special Constable. Paraded the streets all day long in a state of constant alarm.

Wednesday. — Received a letter from my friend SUSIE, who has heard that the Militia are to be called out. Visited her, and discovered that women, as citizens, are now liable to military service.

Thursday. — Had to attend an inquest as a Coroner's Juryman. A very unpleasant duty indeed, as it was held upon a person who had committed a most horrible suicide.

Friday. — Having failed to obey the orders of a County Court Judge, was locked up in prison for contempt. I owe this scrape to the extravagance of my husband—a man who will buy hats and coats, and who will not work for our living.

Saturday. — In deep tribulation. The Governor of the gaol is a female, and, as a matter of course, favours the male prisoners. Asked for a book, and was furnished with a work upon Roman Law. Cried myself to sleep over a passage which told me that no one could obtain the privileges of a citizen without accepting a citizen's duties and responsibilities. Oh, why did I give up the privileges of a real woman for the miseries of a mock man!
I just discovered that "search activity" in my profile will let me search for "woman" successfully but if I search for "man" I get The word man is very common and was ignored by the search.
posted by XMLicious at 7:41 PM on December 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


XMLicious: "(The Diary of a Female of the Future.)"

This woman lives in a city of two dozen citizens and 5,000 criminals, and so she is forced to spend every day being recruited for state business. Until she is locked up for contempt and the cycle repeats and her remaining 23 neighbors now have to police and serve on juries for 5,001 criminals.

When they're all locked up someone calls ollie ollie oxen free and it all starts over.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 8:26 PM on December 20, 2014 [9 favorites]


Well done, Sister Suffragette!
posted by SisterHavana at 8:52 PM on December 20, 2014


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