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The Book of Tebow
January 11, 2014 11:39 PM   Subscribe

Just as anything you said about Tebow was right, anything you said was wrong. And probably offensive to someone. To many Christians he was a hero, a paragon of virtue in an age of great sin, and this feeling complicated any rational measurement of his quarterbacking talent. Tebow has accepted a role as an NCAA football analyst and shown promise.

Tebow, previously [1], [2], [3] on MetaFilter.

Also: The Year of Magical Stinking.
posted by MoonOrb (104 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
Both Hillary Clinton and Tim Tebow take curious amounts of abuse from others and I've never understood why. What has Tim Tebow ever done that was so bad? It seems like he's done a lot of good for others and isn't a jerk or a loudmouth. I'm glad that he's found his niche since he never really did as an NFL quarterback.
posted by koavf at 12:01 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


He was a terrible NFL quarterback. But he was such a good Christian fellow, many of a similar faith held him up as a savior. This resulted in blowback against him.
posted by Windopaene at 12:03 AM on January 12 [9 favorites]


And ESPN pimped him relentlessly for a full season, turning a lot of neutral opinions into negative. Backup QBs shouldn't get the level of attention he did.
posted by GamblingBlues at 12:15 AM on January 12 [8 favorites]


Denver upgraded the position.
posted by Repack Rider at 12:23 AM on January 12


And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
posted by Pope Guilty at 12:27 AM on January 12 [69 favorites]


Interesting long-form. Now only if I could read it properly... Anyone else having trouble using Safari in iOS?

As far as the ongoing Tebow hate goes, you could chalk up the poor skills and the ESPN overexposure as valid reasons for disliking the guy. In my opinion, though, his approach to Christianity is at the root of it for many people.

For many Christians and non-Christians alike, it seems childish, foolish, and sacrilegious to be praising Jesus for touchdown passes. Surely if the gospels are any guide, if Jesus were here today, he would think a pro football game is a monumental waste of time and money, and total idolatry, when all those billions each year could go toward helping the poor and the sick.

He wouldn't waste his time watching every game and magically affecting Tebow's passes so they were completions.

Fortunately for me, I'm not a Christian, so, meh. Go team! When are we getting that new stadium built with taxpayer funds!
posted by Old Man McKay at 12:33 AM on January 12 [41 favorites]


He did an ad for James Dobson, one of the more evil men of our times.
posted by kmz at 12:36 AM on January 12 [28 favorites]


But he was such a good Christian fellow, many of a similar faith held him up as a savior. This resulted in blowback against him.

I hope folks don't buy any of this Christian persecution mythology nonsense. Kurt Warner was a similarly zealous athlete and few questioned his behavior over it.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 1:52 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


For many Christians and non-Christians alike, it seems childish, foolish, and sacrilegious to be praising Jesus for touchdown passes

Yes, he came across as the perfect republican Christian, one who believes Christ was on the side of the winners and he, Tebow, despite lacking the talent and skills to be actually good at his job, was a winner and therefore his buddy Jesus would help him out.

He made a spectacle out of his religion when the words of its founder explicitly warn against doing so.
posted by MartinWisse at 2:01 AM on January 12 [28 favorites]


He's a tiresome holy Joe poster boy for the sort of demographic that US Christians need to distance themselves from.
posted by GallonOfAlan at 2:13 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Only Metafilter could compare Tim Tebow and Hillary Clinton.
posted by rosswald at 3:54 AM on January 12 [11 favorites]


Tebow seems kind and sweet, not v. smart, and genuinely wanting to help others--whether that help is legitimate or not is up for debate, and i am not sure how good he is in football, but his religious practices are a lot more complicated than have been spoken about.
posted by PinkMoose at 4:22 AM on January 12 [3 favorites]


What has Tim Tebow ever done that was so bad?

He was in the habit of publicly and flamboyantly thanking his deity for allowing him to score points in college athletics. That's either amusing or distasteful, depending on whether you're considering the silliness of football or the suffering of eighty percent of the world population.
posted by Mooski at 4:27 AM on January 12 [13 favorites]


There was that shitty anti-abortion ad he did for Focus on the Family that aired during the 2010 Super Bowl, so, y'know, fuck him if only for supporting the homophobic coat-hanger brigade.
posted by The Confessor at 4:35 AM on January 12 [52 favorites]


he didn't ask God to win, he asked God to be the best football player he could be, and that who he was playing with would be safe. That's an impt difference. As well, as much as I am in favour of abortion access, and i am, that section in the article about being called Tommy Tumor, suggests that his anti abortion policies were not just xian doctinare poltics. If they were, he would have spoke at first baptist.
posted by PinkMoose at 4:59 AM on January 12 [5 favorites]


I get extremely frustrated with people who claim to follow Jesus, do the exact opposite of what Jesus taught, and then get applauded by hordes of other supposed Jesus followers. I'm thinking mainly of the verse Pope Guilty quoted above. Those are the words of Jesus, from the Sermon on the Mount, usually considered the most significant block of teaching we have from Christ. It's not some super obscure gotcha verse from the dark side of Zephaniah.

Matthew 6:5-6 “When you pray, don’t be like the hypocrites who love to pray publicly on street corners and in the synagogues where everyone can see them. I tell you the truth, that is all the reward they will ever get. But when you pray, go away by yourself, shut the door behind you, and pray to your Father in private. Then your Father, who sees everything, will reward you."

I mean, how do to read this critical teaching from your Lord and Master and go pray in the end zone of an NFL football game? What is more public than that? I had a long conversation about this with one of my closest friends, a minister with a Master's degree who loves Tebow and there is just an enormous blind spot. Tribalism trumps theology. Every conservative believer in America should have expressed concerns about Tebow ignoring the will of Christ in such a major way. But I never heard it, except from aghast liberals like me, who are naturally suspect.
posted by Pater Aletheias at 5:05 AM on January 12 [32 favorites]


I believe Tebow would take the position that he's trying to discharge his duty under the Great Commission, and not trying to puff up his own righteousness.

speaking of blind spots, Christians of all political and theological persuasions pray in public.
posted by jpe at 5:18 AM on January 12 [5 favorites]


i know the verses, but Christ also healed the sick, preached the gospel, spoke in temple--the procession into jerseuluem was as public as public gets--but if we are cherry picking Matthew, 23:5 Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me. (KJV)--he has done all of these things--he visited death row, he spent hours and hours with sick kids in a move that didn't strike me as pr.
posted by PinkMoose at 5:18 AM on January 12 [11 favorites]


Tim Tebow: Amateur Circumcisionist
posted by davros42 at 5:21 AM on January 12


And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

I won't pretend to know anything about Tim Tebow as an athlete or even what he is like as a person, but for those who see hypocrisy or whatever in his actions, keep in mind that there are verses in the Bible which seem to say the opposite of the verse above, and many flavors of Christianity tend to emphasize these.

"I tell you, whoever publicly acknowledges me before others, the Son of Man will also acknowledge before the angels of God." Matthew 10:32

“You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven." Matthew 5:14-16

I grew up in fundamentalist churches, and it was drummed into us from a very early age that we were to "witness" (talk about) our faith to others, and that not to do so meant you were ashamed to be a Christian and ashamed of Jesus; and also that because you were neglecting opportunities to win souls to Christ, the people you failed to witness to might end up in Hell because you were too embarrassed to witness to them about Jesus, who after all died on the cross for your sins, but you can't be bothered to do this one little thing for him...

I know Tebow's Christian theatrics are annoying to people who are non-religious and somewhat scandalous to those Christians whose denominations were more of the "go into your closet to pray to your Father who sees in secret" variety.

I am no longer evangelical and far from fundamentalist, but I like to wear a cross sometimes and consider it part of my Christian witness. Yet my (also Christian) mother-in-law once mentioned that she thinks people who wear crosses are just trying to show off about how holy they are. We both have a biblical basis for our (admittedly way more mild and less showy than Tim Tebow's) beliefs on whether to be more public or private about our faith.

Looked at from a fundamentalist point of view, Tim Tebow is being courageous and faithful by publically praying and witnessing for Jesus. It may be obnoxious to many people, but I believe he is sincere and doesn't deserve to be branded a hypocritical show-off.
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 5:26 AM on January 12 [25 favorites]


I had nothing against the kid while he was a college player but in the 2011 season when the far right fundies were acting like he was truly god's gift to the NFL made me ill. Some acquaintances of ours, who weren't football fans were suddenly wearing Broncos jerseys and posting photos of little Timmy doing his Tebow prayer on Facebook. I've never been a New England fan but those two games with Denver against the Patriots where young Mr. Tebow was given a demonstration in proper QB technique were quite gratifying.
posted by Ber at 5:31 AM on January 12 [3 favorites]


For many Christians and non-Christians alike, it seems childish, foolish, and sacrilegious to be praising Jesus for touchdown passes. Surely if the gospels are any guide, if Jesus were here today, he would think a pro football game is a monumental waste of time and money, and total idolatry, when all those billions each year could go toward helping the poor and the sick.

This is a brand of Christianity I am unfamiliar with and it just seems off. Every sky pointing athlete that thanks god for their home run prowess, goal scoring, etc. would be the subject of similar hate if this were the case. This doesn't strike me as part of the reason people hate Tebow at all.
posted by IvoShandor at 6:05 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


Deadspin, naturally, responded directly to/mocked this article a couple months back: Sports Illustrated Goes Long on Tim Tebow.

Notable for the use of the phrase "a bonfire of all the strawmen."
posted by Kybard at 6:07 AM on January 12 [5 favorites]


People have spent a lot of words explaining why they dislike him, but the simple explanation is that Tim Tebow is a wanker.
posted by Benjy at 6:21 AM on January 12 [4 favorites]


As someone who homeschooled two kids into college without any help from Jesus at all, his being held up as "proof" homeschooling works drove me batty. He always seemed like a competent speaker when I heard him talk, so I'm not surprised that he might be good at NFL analysis. God knows he can't be worse than some of the clowns getting paid big bucks to do that job today.
posted by COD at 6:24 AM on January 12


Compare : Frank Reich, author of The Comeback. He was a Godly man and will always be remembered as a clutch quarterback. He said his thanks, but for him it didn't turn into a speech impediment.
posted by newdaddy at 6:27 AM on January 12


He gained fans during his time in Denver because he was getting ridiculous, entertaining wins. His clowning of the Steelers was one of the most amusing things I have ever seen on a football field. It's fun to root for an underdog, and he was one as an NFL QB.

I don't mind that he is vocal about his faith. I wish more athletes could be honest about who they are. I do mind that someone like Chris Kluwe might have been blacklisted from the game for saying something that upsets some Christians.
posted by Drinky Die at 6:41 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


I feel the same way about Tebow as I do about the S.E.C., Ayn Rand, and C.S. Lewis:
I have few opinions about the subjects themselves, I just despise their annoying fans.
posted by wester at 6:43 AM on January 12 [8 favorites]


Public opinions are a weird thing, and when there are bandwagons, people tend to leap on them. Tebow had two bandwagons, and they were going in opposite directions.


That's all.


Meanwhile I am waiting for us Christians to realize that one of the biggest idols in our society today is that of Big Sports. And I say that as a longtime Denver fan. I like football but babies, it's just a GAME.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 6:46 AM on January 12 [15 favorites]


if we are cherry picking Matthew, 23:5 Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me. (KJV)--he has done all of these things--he visited death row, he spent hours and hours with sick kids in a move that didn't strike me as pr.
Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in heaven.

Therefore when thou doest thine alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

But when thou doest alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth:

That thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly.

And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.

But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.
posted by Flunkie at 6:46 AM on January 12 [3 favorites]


Anyway, I don't follow football very much these days, so I've always been curious about something about the Tebow saga on a strictly football level, ignoring the Republican Jesus aspect: As I understand it, he was a truly excellent player in college, wasn't he? So what happened?
posted by Flunkie at 6:49 AM on January 12


He's helping sick kids the wrong way, what an ass.
posted by Drinky Die at 6:54 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


He didn't have the passing ability of an NFL quarterback. He relies too much on his legs. NFL defenses are bigger and faster and they will shut you down if you are a one dimensional running QB.
posted by Drinky Die at 6:57 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


We're talking about a guy who won the Heisman trophy once, was a finalist two other times, and won two national championships (and was within one win from a third) as the quarterback for the Florida Gators, one of the highest-profile college football teams. He played on national TV nearly every Saturday. His junior year, Florida loses to Mississippi, then he gives a post-game speech about how nobody will work harder than he and his teammates will, and all of a sudden they're world-beaters who win the national championship. Florida carved his speech in stone near the stadium.

Of course there was going to be a bunch of hype.

Unfortunately, his throwing motion, which was fine for college ball (where something like 6 of his receivers went to the NFL, and most are still there) was weird, slow, and inaccurate. It happens. They're different skill sets.

The Broncos trade up for him, but he doesn't get the starting job. But something weird happens: whenever the Broncos bring him in, good things happen. Despite the actual, you know, passing statistics. So he develops a cult following. The next year, he gets the starting job for a sub-mediocre team halfway through the season and leads them to a playoff win.

John Elway, who runs the Broncos, gets the chance to sign Peyton Manning. I mean, come on, Peyton Manning. You'd replace Tebow too. He goes to the Jets, who have no idea what to do. This year, the Patriots cut him, and despite an abundance of terrible backup quarterbacks in places like Buffalo, Cleveland, and Minnesota, his phone never rings (or he doesn't answer it). And that's that.

Tebow is at the intersection of 3 [cults | religions]:
1. Jesus
2. Florida football / SEC football
3. Broncos fans (including the South Park guys)
posted by Huffy Puffy at 7:04 AM on January 12 [7 favorites]


The biggest Tebow hate in my own social circles came from a few people who are really into fantasy football. On the one hand I think they were justifiably sick of hearing all the excessive praise on the TV shows they like; on the other hand I think they were annoyed that a bunch of people without sufficient learning in their sport dared to have an opinion about a player.

These are also people who like, think it's gauche and unsophisticated to root too hard for your own team. They have a relationship with sports that I can't understand and they can be absolutely insufferable, so I was hoping Tebow would succeed just to spite them. Now I hope he turns out to be a great commentator so they have to look at his face for the rest of their lives.
posted by vogon_poet at 7:10 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


He didn't have the passing ability of an NFL quarterback. He relies too much on his legs. NFL defenses are bigger and faster and they will shut you down if you are a one dimensional running QB.
But shouldn't this have been clear to NFL scouts and coaches? Why was he drafted in the first round if he didn't have the passing ability of an NFL quarterback?
posted by Flunkie at 7:23 AM on January 12


There is only one religion in America that we all devoutly worship: Winning. For a brief time Tebow seemed like a prophet, but he turned out to be a false prophet. Many people will never forgive him for that.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 7:26 AM on January 12 [6 favorites]


Tebow's a tough one for me. I like his heart but I hate his politics as far as I know them. I think morality and spiritualism operate best when they are kept separate from personal politics -- at least in the public sphere.

Some of those games he played really were extraordinary though.
posted by nowhere man at 7:27 AM on January 12


He gained fans during his time in Denver because he was getting ridiculous, entertaining wins.

I watched all those games. Tebow was playing, and the team won. He didn't win those games, he just wasn't quite bad enough to loose those games. Of the seven regular season wins he started for, we had less than 20 points on five, and won by a single score on all but one of the wins. Most of those were by 4 points or less, which meant that the win should go to the Defense (who held the other team to a field goal instead of a touchdown) or the kicker.

I think people outside of Denver don't really get why Tebow was put in, but it's simple enough if you were watching the crowds and local commentary: Tebow wasn't Kyle Orton. What's more is that he looked successful (at first) when he was on the field because he only came on the field for a few novelty plays, which he was good at, and being unexpected, worked. At some point, coaches realized this and changed their Defense when he was put in. By the time it was clear that putting Tebow in for a QB run wasn't going to work anymore, it was too late, Orton was already cast as "the loser" and Tebow was cast as "The guy that saves the game." I mean, crowds were booing Orton as he took the field. He was shook up and his team-mates had no confidence in him. ANYONE as a second string QB would have gotten the nod, it just happened that Tebow was there.

Over the course of the season, it became obvious that Tebow wasn't really all that good of a QB, and that teams were adjusting to his style of play quickly. Plus, he's taking all these hits from running all the time. QBs aren't supposed to be taking that many hits, they don't have the padding that guys who take all those hits have; it wears them down. He simple wasn't going to make it to be a clever experienced QB. He was a bad investment for the future of the team, and the short term pay offs weren't nearly good enough to justify that.

Personally, I dislike Tebow because as a rookie he did a crass, offensive, and pretty damn arrogant ad, targeted at shaming people who were at their most vulnerable. Mainly though, I just hated the Tebow hype that he consistently didn't live up too, and the fact that it meant the people who deserved the credit didn't get it. Oh, and the verbing of his name, and all the stupid face-book pictures I had to see of old classmates posing like him. Most of what I don't like isn't really his fault. I mean, he isn't the only player given credit where he shouldn't have been, nor the only one to pray on field. It's not his fault he's the one whose posturing went viral. It was just a perfect storm of crap I find annoying with him as the butterfly flapping it's wing.
posted by Gygesringtone at 7:35 AM on January 12 [14 favorites]


It was clear to most of the NFL, but it only takes one dope to make somebody a first-round pick. A lot of the talk about him leading up to that draft was about whether he would be willing to switch positions, because his size and running ability suggest he could make it as a fullback or tight end.
posted by aaronetc at 7:36 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Why was he drafted in the first round if he didn't have the passing ability of an NFL quarterback?

Coaches think they can fix things. Tebow's a hard worker.
posted by Trochanter at 7:38 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Why was he drafted in the first round if he didn't have the passing ability of an NFL quarterback?

No one in the NFL actually has the job of "playing football." Their actual jobs are selling tickets, attracting television viewers and selling merchandise. Winning is behind all that stuff. There is a reason that the Dallas Cowboys are the NFL's most valuable franchise, and it is not that they have won exactly one playoff game in the last fifteen years (that is as many playoff wins as Tim Tebow). It is because they attract the most eyeballs and push the most silver-and-blue crap, regardless of whether they win.

That's why a lot of people thought Tebow would end up with the Jacksonville Jaguars after the Broncos upgraded -- because, win or lose (well, let's be honest, it's the Jags: lose), he would sell a lot of tickets right down the street from the University of Florida.
posted by Etrigan at 7:38 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


50 biggest quarterback busts Quibble with the list if you like, but basically there's a long tradition of quarterbacks coming out of college with great records and sucking in the NFL. And honestly, there's a long tradition of most people making it to the NFL and sucking. And so who you have left in the starting lineups, for the most part, are bigger, strong, faster, and tougher than who you played against in college when you were looking all good. It's like sports Darwinism on an impossibly fast timeline.

Two things about Tebow: yes, while many players point to the sky after a touchdown or cross themselves before kicking/punting, only Tebow decided to make it All About Him with the elaborate choregraphy. To me it wasn't about public prayer, which is to me an annoying--but clearly inevitable--part of sports. But the gesture itself seemed to deliberately draw attention back to Tebow, to his own self, rather than actually pointing (heh) to Jesus. It seemed incredibly self-involved, from my perspective, especially when some Broncos fans started printing jerseys with his number and "Jesus" on the back.

Also, let us talk about another instant of Tebow's giant failure at humility,(which I'm pretty sure is also supposed to be a big thing in Christianity, right?) Because many experts and analysts have suggested that if he'd been willing to stop being a horrendous quarterback and start being a more than decent fullback or tight end, the dude would still be playing in an NFL jersey. He let his ego play himself out of a career in the NFL just because he decided that being QB was the bestest.
posted by TwoStride at 7:39 AM on January 12 [3 favorites]


I didn't care for Tebow and his very public show of faith. However, he was treated horribly by the Jets, with their idiotic constant switching of QB's, and so I'm glad to see him land a decent gig.
posted by etaoin at 7:52 AM on January 12


I hate Tebow for the same reason that I hate lots of people, because he beat the Bears.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 7:56 AM on January 12 [5 favorites]


It's funny to blame it on religion because the biggest turbochristians I know are football fans and they loathe him because ESPN covered him like a teenage girl covering a Beatles concert.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 8:08 AM on January 12


Every sky pointing athlete that thanks god for their home run prowess, goal scoring, etc. would be the subject of similar hate if this were the case.

Well, if one looks at God/Jesus from the "omniscient and omnipresent" standing, then it can come down to "I'm grateful Jesus even saw fit to helping little old me in this game amidst all the other things he does," which would be humble as well as pious. I'm not much of a sports fan, though, so I don't know how many athletes actually express themselves thusly.

Thing is, I don't disagree at all that the whole business of pro sports is blown way out of proportion. And the business is good at hyping itself. You'd think these people are curing cancer or something, and that this game of chasing a ball around a field of grass really is something for the history books... and that's what makes it obnoxious.
posted by scaryblackdeath at 8:10 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


"Marge, have you ever sat down and read this thing? Technically, we're not allowed to go to the bathroom."
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 8:25 AM on January 12 [5 favorites]


Makes me wonder where Johnny Manziel will be in 5 years.
posted by yoga at 8:57 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


I also found his refusal to try another position to be weirdly at odds with his public persona. When the Patriots signed Tebow, he had an opportunity with an organization known for getting the absolute maximum out of every player and he basically walked away from it by sticking to the QB position. This in a year in which the Patriots' TE heavy offense was dismantled entirely. I suppose the only thing that could have made the media obsession worse was if it turned out he couldn't catch very well, either.
posted by feloniousmonk at 8:59 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


I agree with the opinion of Pater Aletheus above that displays in mixed company are not good taste. The example that has most directly affected me is people saying grace in Christian format at a group meal where there are people sitting at the table who have been traumatized by their excessively strict, even violent, Christian religious upbringing. It makes me very uncomfortable. If you really think it helps to have a prayer in that situation you really ought to bend over backwards to make the format as generic as you possibly can. When the sideline reporter interviews Tebow after a game and he mentions Jesus or Christ or the Lord or God or whatever five times in sixty seconds it is pretty damn creepy. On the other hand it is only sixty damn seconds so perhaps making a big deal about it contributes. Like don't feed the trolls. I don't know.

Maybe part of the fascination is he claims he is a virgin and there are a bunch of people who think he is gay and they are morbidly anticipating another shoe to drop in this saga. He is more talented than Paris Hilton. He has never had a complete successful season as a starting NFL quarterback so his athletic accomplishments are in the same ballpark as Gifford Nielsen, who is a leader of the Mormon church and does not make any spectacle of his religion that I have ever seen and is widely respected by all as player and teammate and friend.
posted by bukvich at 9:02 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


As a University of Oklahoma fan and alum, my Tebow fatigue is sort of rooted in the college football rivalry between Florida and OU, because during the 2008/2009 season, ESPN was touting him as the second coming of Christ. The BCS championship title game was #1 Oklahoma versus #2 Florida. The media went out of their way to portray Tebow as the second coming of almighty Christ. Meanwhile, our quarterback was sophomore Heisman trophy winner Sam Bradford (and Texas had Colt McCoy), so the Tebow hype became a symbol of the constant pro-SEC bias in the media. During the BCS title game, for example, the quarterback profile of Tim Tebow focused more on his work with lepers than, you know, his football. His faith took center stage, but both Bradford and McCoy, who were also devout, were less vocal about it and let their football do the talking, so it just felt like the media was sort of facilitating a GOD LOVES THE SEC vibe.
TL;DR: Schadenfreude
posted by Dr. Zira at 9:12 AM on January 12 [3 favorites]


However, he was treated horribly by the Jets, with their idiotic constant switching of QB's, and so I'm glad to see him land a decent gig.

From all accounts, Ryan didn't even want him on the team to begin with and had Tebow forced on him by then-GM Mike Tenanbaum. Tebow's play indicated that he wasn't any better than their starting QB (the shitty, underwhelming Mark Sanchez) and when he told Rex Ryan and the Jets coaching staff that he would NOT play any other position other than QB, his fate was sealed. After that, he barely played down the stretch in his season in NY.

As for his pre-season stint with the Patriots this year, I suspect that has as much to do with Pats OC Josh McDaniels (his former HC in Denver who had drafted him) doing a favor for him by convincing Bill Belichick that they had nothing to lose by trying Tebow out as a back-up QB. Tebow couldn't unseat Ryan Mallet as the back-up QB and was cut. We don't know if Belichick ever considered asking Tebow about switching to TE (especially in the wake of the Aaron Hernandez arrest) but the fact that Tebow was out on the street come Opening Day indicates that playing TE was never really an option for either Tebow or the Pats.

ESPN is probably the best place for him, seeing as they were the ones responsible for hyping him up in the first place.
posted by KingEdRa at 9:29 AM on January 12


Every conservative believer in America should have expressed concerns about Tebow ignoring the will of Christ in such a major way. But I never heard it, except from aghast liberals like me, who are naturally suspect.

I'll admit, I find that opinion suspect. It focuses pretty narrowly on one thing Tebow did "wrong" while ignoring a lot of things he did that were good, charitable, and kind. Moreover, many people don't consider it their job to police how Tim Tebow or anybody else interacts with his or her—or their, or our—religion. This is the kind of language you see bandied about when someone commits violence in religion's name, and it's not completely unreasonable in that context, but it's bizarre in this one.
posted by cribcage at 9:38 AM on January 12 [2 favorites]


MetaFilter: It's not some super obscure gotcha verse from the dark side of Zephaniah.
posted by Celsius1414 at 9:56 AM on January 12 [4 favorites]


Moreover, many people don't consider it their job to police how Tim Tebow or anybody else interacts with his or her—or their, or our—religion. This is the kind of language you see bandied about when someone commits violence in religion's name, and it's not completely unreasonable in that context, but it's bizarre in this one.

Taking a quote from a theory class out of context : "Modernity is about judging."
posted by PMdixon at 10:38 AM on January 12


"They say we were giving him a hard time because he's a Christian. No, that's not it! We were giving him a hard time because he was terrible." -- Terrell Suggs
posted by box at 11:20 AM on January 12


I find it bad faith to claim that you dislike him because he's not living the Sermon on the Mount as you think he should. His religiosity was just getting pumped up before a game and he always seemed humble about it (at least compared to other football players psyching out). The ad he did with Focus on the Family is cheesy but in no way offensive. I don't like Focus on the Family either but you're desperately grasping for straws when you say that this commercial and some face paint are enough of a reason to hate this guy. He's also evidently done a lot of charity work but I guess that doesn't outweigh this in your mind? Getting mad at him is like blaming a musician for a song being overplayed on the radio. I understand if you have a bad taste in your mouth but that doesn't mean that you should get pissy with the person who made it.
posted by koavf at 11:23 AM on January 12 [1 favorite]


To say that I don't like Focus on the Family isn't quite strong enough.

Focus on the Family is a hate group.
posted by box at 11:38 AM on January 12 [16 favorites]


Heh. Roll Tide, motherfuckers.

I dislike Tim Tebow less for the relentlessly positive plasticine persona he projects and more for the expectations projected onto him by his fans. Making fun of him is making fun of them, and if that makes me an awful classist bullyboy then so be it.

And let's face it, it's immensely satisfying to watch upbeat, cheerful, positive people get ground up and spat out by cold hard reality. If only the Germans had a word for that. Oh yeah, they totally do.

To quote a random guy in a Jets jersey whom I overheard at a sports bar once: "All the Jesus in the worl' ain't gon' make you an NFL quarterback, son!"

Commenting on the SEC is a good place for Tebow to be. He was inarguably one of the most successful SEC QBs ever, he knows the game inside and out, and he's a camera hog.

And I hope he gets another shot at the NFL so I can ridicule him yet again.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 12:05 PM on January 12 [3 favorites]


Tebow's draft raised a fair number of ugly racial questions, too. The the game plan his team used when he played in college, which depended on his frequently running with the ball himself in order to keep the defense off-balance, had long been derided as not only useless in the NFL, but actively harmful to the development of a potential pro quarterback.

A large number of of extremely successful, and fast, college quarterbacks had been drafted into the NFL as running backs, or not drafted at all, because they were seen as depending too much on their legs to be successful QBs at the professional level. Many of these players were black. The common knock was that they relied too much on their "athleticism" for a position that's supposed to be about knowledge and brains, about being a "general" in command of the offense.

And then, someone's mind changes. A team decides that they'll take a quarterback who runs. Not only that, but when they put him in, they actually begin to try a college -influenced offense with occasional quarterback running plays, at the pro level. And who first gets the benefit of this doubt? One of the several amazingly gifted black Heisman winners with absurdly fast sprint times and a reputation for spending their lives watching game film? Nope. The first running quarterback at the pro level is going to be a young white man known more for his earnestness than his brains, with fleet feet but an obvious, and much discussed, problem in the way he throws. Who happens to appeal to an intensely-conservative white Christian minority. Some of the folks who are not part of that minority have a good reason to feel some resentment.
posted by CHoldredge at 12:07 PM on January 12 [8 favorites]


Michael Vick and Vince Young were both high draft picks at QB and played a similar style. Alex Smith likewise parlayed running/college passing to the #1 pick, though he's white. Donovan McNabb is a less-direct predecessor, and Cam Newton, who was Tebow's backup at Florida, is a partial successor.
posted by Huffy Puffy at 12:28 PM on January 12 [4 favorites]


Randall Cunningham had a lot of success. I'm sure Tebow is a good guy and way over-hyped, and he had to play along. Why not make the money in the glory of god? When he was in NY, there was a little of the proselytizing but I guess they knew it didn't play that well.
posted by sfts2 at 12:34 PM on January 12


I liked the GQ piece. It brought back how much fun that crazy run was. Tebow Time was a riot. The Lions "Tebowing" at center field? Bears pass defenders confounded and paralyzed when he did that bootleggy thing in the red area? Jets defenders losing their minds and charging him, leaving their assigned receivers completely alone in the end zone against the exact same play?? Dick LeBeau's brain dead game plan??? Good freaking times.

And for whatever his skills are, he could play in big moments. Some guys who have wa-a-a-ay more throwing aptitude cannot do that.
posted by Trochanter at 12:37 PM on January 12 [3 favorites]


In addition to the people mentioned by Huffy Puffy, Randall Cunningham was a great running quarterback before Tim Tebow was even born. It's not like Tebow is the first running quarterback, and it's not like black running quarterbacks never got a shot in the pros.
posted by Flunkie at 12:41 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


The ad he did with Focus on the Family yt is cheesy but in no way offensive.

I don't know, I find trying to emotionally manipulate women who are trying to make an incredibly tough and life altering choice about a medical procedure during the most watched television event of the year is pretty offensive.

Getting mad at him is like blaming a musician for a song being overplayed on the radio.


That's an interesting point, musicians and the record labels do their best to get as much radio play as possible. It's a big part of why they sign with a record label.

You just reminded me that Tebow has written a book and released a DVD that he'll sell you so you can hear about his inspirational life. I mean, we can't really blame Tebow for all the hype, but I do wonder how much fanning of the flame he's done.
posted by Gygesringtone at 12:46 PM on January 12 [2 favorites]


Vick, McNabb, Randall, Newton...all of these guys have significantly better passing mechanics than Tebow. To be a successful running QB you have to be able to pass competently too. You could be the best runner in the world and you will still be shut down if the defense doesn't have to respect your arm.
posted by Drinky Die at 12:53 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


> "I'm grateful Jesus even saw fit to helping little old me in this game amidst all the other things he does,"

I don't believe that really works - but if it did, why wouldn't that be cheating? I'm not being jocular - many athletes seem to think that Jesus helps them win - if it were true, how would that remotely be fair?
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 1:05 PM on January 12


I'm not aware of anything in the rulebook that precludes interference from deities.
posted by Flunkie at 1:08 PM on January 12 [3 favorites]


And let me add that the ESPN article is... unpleasant. The repeated crosses in the text alone are IMHO quite unacceptable for a non-religious magazine.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 1:08 PM on January 12


I think it's okay to ask the Lord to help you be the best you can be in your profession be that pro athlete or real estate assistant or whatever. But sometimes one can be forgiven for getting the impression God has a favorite team. He doesn't. If he did it would be the Broncos, of course. ;-)
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 1:11 PM on January 12


Isn't Satan the one who is going to take a form that is pleasing to the eye? HMMMMM?
posted by Renoroc at 1:28 PM on January 12


I'm not aware of anything in the rulebook that precludes interference from deities.
Upon further investigation, I take that back. Rule 13, Section 1, Article 7:
A non-player shall not commit any act which is palpably unfair.

Penalty: For a palpably unfair act, see 12-3-3. The Referee, after consulting the crew, shall make such ruling as he considers equitable (15-1-6 and Note). (Unsportsmanlike Conduct.)

Note: Various actions involving a palpably unfair act may arise during a game. In such cases, the officials may award a distance penalty in accordance with 12-3-3, even when it does not involve disqualification of a player or substitute. See 17-1.
"Palpably unfair" as defined in 12-3-3 seems kind of vague, giving broad discretion to the ref. I'd say divine intervention fits. So it seems like Tebow should have been penalized a lot more than he was.
posted by Flunkie at 1:32 PM on January 12 [4 favorites]


> I'm not aware of anything in the rulebook that precludes interference from deities.

The non-interference rules as far as I know do not specify whether the one interfering is human or divine. (On preview, Flunkie actually did the footwork for me, thanks!) And because the player is organizing this interference, they are the ones cheating anyway. If I train a dog to run into the game to help me, I'm not going to get away with it because dogs aren't mentioned in the rules.

But that's basically irrelevant. Even if not literally prohibited, having a third party interfere in any sort of game definitely breaks the spirit of the rules.

I have this issue in general with the idea of effective prayer. What sort of "judge" gives preferential treatment to his friends? For that matter, what sort of "judge" will condemn me to infinite torture unless I suck up to him and tell Him that He's the greatest being in the universe?

This seems to be the core of the difference between me and a great deal of conservatives - not just in the field of religion - the idea that patronage and privilege are perfectly OK if you're in the "right club".

Before the differences got too great, I had arguments with my conservative friends about insider trading ("What's wrong with profiting from your relationships with other professionals?"), about other Wall Street and war crimes prosecutions ("These are important people, and can't be expected to follow the same rules we do"), conflicts of interest and "no bid contracts" ("Halliburton were clearly the only people who could do the job - and surely the company owned by the Vice-President will do a better job since they have better information?")

All the same thing - "Profiting from friends in high places at the expense of everyone else is completely ethical." At least they're consistent...
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 1:43 PM on January 12 [3 favorites]


The discussion from the priest at the beginning and end of this video seems relevant.
posted by vogon_poet at 1:52 PM on January 12


Tebowmania happened because of 4:25 PM starts. What would happen is: the 4:05 PM games (often nationally televised) would end, and the networks would switch to a competitive game. Denver's defense was keeping games competitive, so they'd switch to them frequently. So a lot of Denver finishes got televised, and that's when Tebow looked competent. If you watched a full game, the incompetence showed - but he would look brilliant for 5 minutes running against a gassed defense for an improbable comeback win. The Patriots showed the weakness of this strategy: they picked the Denver defense apart and there was no coming back.

I think the religious angle and misplaced fandom have hurt him a lot. Tebow has awful mechanics but a quarterback-desperate team might sign him, if it didn't mean an instant quarterback controversy and three-ring media circus. But given the reality of what Tebow represents, he's no good to any team now.
posted by graymouser at 2:02 PM on January 12 [2 favorites]


As a non-football fan, the thing that's always irked me about Tebow is simply that he's yet another product line of Brand Christian, the same conglomerate that promotes things like Chik-Fil-A (a mediocre-even-for-fast-food product not all that different from what Sysco ships all over the world by the kiloton) and Duck Dynasty (limited appeal even for a reality show). The idea behind Brand Christian is that it is preferable not because of some intrinsic superiority but because it stands as an easy signifier that you're not with Those Others, You Know Who I Mean. The inevitable backlash tends to strengthen the product's standing with the brand. The exact degree to which Tebow himself actively or passively cooperated with Brand Christian is not terribly important.
posted by Halloween Jack at 2:17 PM on January 12 [8 favorites]


"They say we were giving him a hard time because he's a Christian. No, that's not it! We were giving him a hard time because he was terrible."


This is kind of how I feel about Mario Balotelli.


Mario Balotelli should not be verbally abused for the color of his skin. He should be verbally abused for the content of his character.



Unfortunately, too many other people feel the opposite.
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 2:35 PM on January 12


As for his pre-season stint with the Patriots this year, I suspect that has as much to do with Pats OC Josh McDaniels (his former HC in Denver who had drafted him) doing a favor for him by convincing Bill Belichick that they had nothing to lose by trying Tebow out as a back-up QB.

Tebow was the Pat's coaching staff's only shot at heaven.
posted by dismas at 2:46 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Focus on the Family is a malignant evil.

As a youth, I attended at least two churches that featured their materials. Fifteen years later, I remain deeply ashamed of how raptly I read their tracts, and how completely I absorbed their worldview.

I've since come to understand that they and their satellite ventures are the "Watch Tower Society" of the evangelical and Christian fundamentalist movements. They may lack direct authority over their constituent churches, but the influence they have with churchgoers (and thus with churches themselves) is tremendous, and they use every ounce of it to promote and enforce a politicized theology that marginalizes and ostracizes gays, lesbians, and transgender people, and seeks an end to abortion without nuance or care for the societal ills that would result.

So fuck them, fuck Tim Tebow for his association with them, but most of all... fuck me for all the shit that I believed, and everything I did and said in that belief.
posted by The Confessor at 3:08 PM on January 12 [10 favorites]


> And who first gets the benefit of this doubt? One of the several amazingly gifted black
> Heisman winners with absurdly fast sprint times and a reputation for spending their lives
> watching game film? Nope.

The four quarterbacks one thinks of as the ones who brought a heavy QB running load to the NFL are Vince Young, Tim Tebow, Cam Newton, and Robert Griffin III. Three of these are black, including the first one (Young was drafted #3 overall in 2006, Tebow #25 overall in 2010.)
posted by jfuller at 3:27 PM on January 12


And who first gets the benefit of this doubt?

Randall Cunningham.

Jesus, I feel old right now.
posted by Etrigan at 3:31 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


I loathed Tebow because SEC, but in the NFL, I thought it was fascinating how the guy he replaced to get his start was essentially the guy he should have been. Kyle Orton (he of the NECKBEARD) was a sixth or seventh round pick, destined to be a career backup, and then the starting QB (Rex Grossman, which shows that these were indeed dark days) was injured, and Orton was suddenly the starter. He played in eleven games and went 10-1, I believe. There was joking about it, about him being made the starter over Grossman, but as bad as Grossman was, Orton wasn't the answer. The Bears defense won those games, and Orton did what he was told to do, manage the game. He wasn't full of himself, and he knew what his role was, as well as his ceiling.

Tebow, on the other hand, I seriously doubt there would have been half as much mania about him if he hadn't pushed his faith in everyone's face. People who didn't follow football were talking about Tebow and his beliefs. Once again, a white Christian player was seen as an antidote to the godless (and don't forget, predominantly black!) ways of professional sports.

Tebow would never have gotten a tenth of the press he got if he hadn't pushed religion so hard. If he weren't white, we wouldn't be having this discussion, because he might have gotten drafted in the sixth round, then washed out of the league already.

Marginal talent at best, with big PR. That's why there's Tebow hate.

And no one, anywhere, should carry "I beat the Bears when Lovie Smith was the coach" as a sign of pride. It's not what you'd call an accomplishment.
posted by Ghidorah at 3:40 PM on January 12 [2 favorites]


Michael Vick had over 1000 rushing yards in 2006, a first for an NFL quarterback.
posted by aaronetc at 5:09 PM on January 12


Looked at from a fundamentalist point of view, Tim Tebow is being courageous and faithful by publically praying and witnessing for Jesus. It may be obnoxious to many people, but I believe he is sincere and doesn't deserve to be branded a hypocritical show-off.

Ostentatiously publicly thanking your Deity for helping you play a game is about as vain and show-offy as you can get. What makes your game more important than people suffering, that you're going to get a hand, but they aren't?

Sorry, no, he deserves every bit of scorn he's getting. That behavior is just gross.
posted by MissySedai at 6:56 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


If your understanding of prayer is that it asks a deity to distract his attention from what he's doing elsewhere and attend himself to your problem instead, then I'd gently suggest you're not qualified to express an opinion on the subject. "Better to remain silent...", as the adage goes.
posted by cribcage at 7:57 PM on January 12 [2 favorites]


The obvious strategic use for Tebow is for a team with a weak qb to hire him as a relief qb. Bring him in in the fourth quarter when the team is behind our the other team is staging a strong come back and take advantage of his strong last minute skills.
posted by Joey Michaels at 7:59 PM on January 12


In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds

Like...scoring touchdowns?
posted by Steely-eyed Missile Man at 8:04 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


(For what is worth, I know that my suggestion is ludicrous)
posted by Joey Michaels at 9:01 PM on January 12



cribcage, you seem to be suggesting that god has plenty of time and attention to pay to the problems of the world but just doesn't care to.
posted by evilDoug at 9:52 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Praying to do your best at something trivial -- praying that what you're doing will bring glory to God in its own way -- is a central part of a lot of people's Christian practice, and in no way an indication that the pray-er thinks whatever random trivial crap they are involved in that day is more important than people starving.

(Having said that, I do have a really passionate throw-things-at-the-TV rage for people who thank Jesus for touchdowns. If Tim Tebow is one of those people then I have probably thrown some laundry at his face on occasion.)
posted by gerstle at 10:18 PM on January 12 [1 favorite]


Kyle Orton (he of the NECKBEARD)

Every time I see Andrew Luck smile I wonder if it's because he had a great season or because his paladin finally got that Holy Avenger sword in last night's D&D session.
posted by Pope Guilty at 3:45 AM on January 13 [5 favorites]


He was a terrible NFL quarterback.

Eh. He won a playoff game his first season under center, before running face-first into the Patriots, which are post-season monsters (How you doin', Luck?). He's an unconventional player, without a doubt, and will have trouble fitting into many schemes, which is why he's out of the league - but terrible?

Ryan should have played him at QB at least once - a good passer who accepts his fate is worse than a bad passer who moves mountains to get the ball down the field.

Rex got nervous for his career after a rocky start to a bad season, and went super conservative rather than go with his original "situational QB" idea - and it didn't help that teams seemed to have the wildcat thoroughly figured out in 2012. But there's a difference when a typical RB is running the wildcat, and when Tebow is running the wildcat.

As Tebow is about the only player who could fill a situational QB role, it's unlikely to develop, and he's unlikely to return to the league. If I were taking the Browns front office job, tho, I'd give it some thought... if I'm going to lose, I want to lose with style and making headlines rather than just waste a season.
posted by Slap*Happy at 5:22 AM on January 13


He won a playoff game his first season under center, before running face-first into the Patriots, which are post-season monsters (How you doin', Luck?). He's an unconventional player, without a doubt, and will have trouble fitting into many schemes, which is why he's out of the league - but terrible?

See, that's why I hated the Tebow hype. Here's the famous OT Touchdown. It's an o.k. throw, but nothing spectacular, the run following the catch is where the fireworks happen. I mean, you're talking about a franchise that had Elway for all those years, The Drive is what a QB winning a game looks like. What that looks like is Demaryius Thomas winning the game.

I'm having a problem seeing the difference between not being able to win games (which is what being not successful is) as a Quarterback in the NFL and being a bad NFL Quarterback. I mean, I watched what happened when Tebow was used as a situational QB: after the first 4 or 5 games that he was put in, run the ball, and called back out, every time he was put in, the Defense shifted to block a QB run, and stopped him. It didn't work because NFL coaches are good at pattern recognition.
posted by Gygesringtone at 6:12 AM on January 13


What that looks like is Demaryius Thomas winning the game.

I'm having a problem seeing the difference between not being able to win games (which is what being not successful is) as a Quarterback in the NFL and being a bad NFL Quarterback.


So you don't want to give Tebow credit for winning a game and then immediately blame Tebow for not winning games.
posted by Etrigan at 6:42 AM on January 13


Every time I see Andrew Luck smile I wonder if it's because he had a great season or because his paladin finally got that Holy Avenger sword in last night's D&D session.

They tell me Andrew (the Giant) Luck is more of a Settlers of Catan kind of guy. This is a fun piece on Luck from Robert Mays at Grantland.

I'm really pulling for Luck. I fear he may be stuck under yet another idiot owner, though.
posted by Trochanter at 7:11 AM on January 13


I'm really pulling for Luck. I fear he may be stuck under yet another idiot owner, though.

He's stuck under the same owner that Peyton Manning was. Can't ask for too much more in that department.
posted by Etrigan at 8:24 AM on January 13


I do kind of wonder why the T-person wouldn't try out at other positions like (obvious) halfback or tight end.

Tebow certainly isn't Jim Brown or Walter Payton as a runner, but neither was Larry Csonka. Put Csonka on a top team that needed a plain straight-ahead power runner, though, and it doesn't matter that he couldn't do triple back flips over defensemen or take invisible shortcuts through the purple dimension the way some backs can. There Zonk is, Super Bowl MVP, NFL Hall of Fame.
posted by jfuller at 8:48 AM on January 13 [2 favorites]


The Browns fans have suffered enough, don't try and inflict Tebow on them.
posted by Drinky Die at 9:09 AM on January 13 [1 favorite]


He's stuck under the same owner that Peyton Manning was.

Wasn't that the dad?
posted by Trochanter at 9:17 AM on January 13


Sorry. Or at least Jim Irsay seemed to be content to let Polian run things. Now he seems more involved. Not. Good.
posted by Trochanter at 9:21 AM on January 13


I didn't like Tebow because he was uniting all of these Christians together at work and they were making this big stink about how they're all oppressed Christians and it's so great in this secular Satanic world that Christians can make a big show of their faith so I was like "Psst, I'm not a Christian" and they were like "waaaaaah?" and then I converted them all to tolerating the presence of non-Christians who aren't constantly vocally complaining about how fucking annoying it is to live in their world while hearing them whine about the "War on Christmas" and such, and eventually got them all to come around on gay marriage and one of them was already in favor of medical marijuana and then they call flipped for recreational marijuana and after awhile I was profoundly attracted to one of them and luckily she quit along with another one of them and since then has teasingly invited me to take her home when we occasionally all meet up, in order to have non-Christian adultery sex due to her husband being less than cool but I'm a good secular husband with integrity and the inability to lie well who wouldn't do that but I would like to and have to fight any efforts to maintain contact now that I realize the complexities of adult humanness moreso than ever.

So I guess he turned out alright, but I was put off by "Tebowing" and yes, he did make it all about him, he was a spectacle IMHO that exploded way beyond its means, and proved that anyone who is a "great college player" but "doesn't practice well or consistently" is not going to be a "great NFL player" who suddenly brings college-style aw-shucks plays into the NFL.

/knowsFuckAllAboutFootball
posted by lordaych at 3:11 PM on January 13 [1 favorite]


. . . or take invisible shortcuts through the purple dimension the way some backs can.

Now I've found the best desciption of Barry Sanders' entire career that I've ever read.
posted by KingEdRa at 3:56 PM on January 13 [1 favorite]


KingEdRa, that's the cheerful, positive description. I've got the four words that will make you sad:

Coached by Wayne Fontes.

Can you imagine what an offense with Barry Sanders, Herman Moore, and Brett Periman could have been like under even a competant coach?
posted by Ghidorah at 4:26 PM on January 13 [1 favorite]


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