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Here's your frakkin' map
January 24, 2011 3:01 PM   Subscribe

Ever wondered how the Twelve Colonies of Battlestar Galatica fit around a single star? Then gaze upon a lovely map of star clusters that is the BSG universe, designed by writer Jane Espenson and science advisor Kevin Grazier
posted by Brandon Blatcher (78 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
How many angels can dance on a pin?
posted by Artw at 3:11 PM on January 24, 2011


Oh wow.
posted by rtha at 3:13 PM on January 24, 2011


And in case anyone is wondering, the series bible can be found here (.pdf, less than awesome scan).
posted by rtha at 3:17 PM on January 24, 2011 [5 favorites]


Confession Time:

When naming cities in Civ V I tend to use ...uh versions of the BSG colony names according to what resources are nearby Arleon for farmland, Picon for fish, Canceri for metal....

feels good to get that off my chest.
posted by The Whelk at 3:17 PM on January 24, 2011 [7 favorites]


What I would really like the science advisor to explain is why the robots' spines can glow red and why they can connect to computers by inserting metal plugs into their arms when they are indistinguishable from humans at the cellular level.
posted by IjonTichy at 3:18 PM on January 24, 2011 [15 favorites]


So, let me get this straight: Caprica and Gemenon orbit a common barycenter, that barycenter goes around Helios Alpha. Helios Alpha shares a barycenter with Helios Beta, and that barycenter in turn goes around the barycenter of two other stars and a fistful of other planets and their moons? Or this map?

Unstable as all hell, especially with Ragnar there. No wonder the show wasn't on long, everyone would die from planets scattering about into the dark or plunging into any of the handy suns.
posted by adipocere at 3:19 PM on January 24, 2011 [4 favorites]


So say we ... holy shit this is cool.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 3:20 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


Ophiucha would be full of snakes.

So, anyway, you know what makes less sense than this, planets and distances wise? Empire Strikes Back.

And then of course there's Firefly.
posted by Artw at 3:20 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


The Facebook page for the 12 colonies currently has 49 friends, as of this writing. Did you create that profile for this post, Brandon Blatcher?
posted by KGMoney at 3:23 PM on January 24, 2011


That is a purdy image.

Unstable as all hell, especially with Ragnar there. No wonder the show wasn't on long, everyone would die from planets scattering about into the dark or plunging into any of the handy suns.


Only has to last a couple of millennia.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 3:35 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]




This image makes me positively joyful.

My SO and I are kicking around the idea of setting up a Diaspora game, and one night we sat down and put together a cluster just to see how it worked, and it took every ounce of restraint I possess to not just make it an elaborate copy of the BSG universe. Apparently I am desperate to watch the show again.
posted by bewilderbeast at 3:42 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


And then of course there's Firefly.

Gotta be the worst. Whedon either doesn't know or doesn't care about the difference between a solar system and a galaxy.
posted by Justinian at 3:43 PM on January 24, 2011


re; the series bible: a combination of series arcs, multi-episode arcs, and episode arcs has never been attempted in science fiction? JMS, please call your office on Babylon 5.
posted by rmd1023 at 3:45 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


Whedon either doesn't know or doesn't care about the difference between a solar system and a galaxy.

I would say both. Firefly is about as far from hard sci-fi as you can get. But at least it still got the no sound in space thing right.

(If all else fails, a wizard did it.)
posted by kmz at 3:51 PM on January 24, 2011


Only has to last a couple of millennia.

Not if you want to give the planets time to turn from dust clouds through molten rock to something you can stand on. Unless God interferes. Again.
posted by Cironian at 3:53 PM on January 24, 2011 [5 favorites]


what I still don't get is the algae planet. So the final five stopped off there to make a gaudy temple for themselves, then whizzed off?
posted by angrycat at 3:58 PM on January 24, 2011


what I still don't get is the algae planet. So the final five stopped off there to make a gaudy temple for themselves, then whizzed off?

DUH NO GOD DID IT
posted by vorfeed at 4:01 PM on January 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


My favorite part is the way the map refers to Terraforming as "Koboliforming". And it has the names of all the Pyramid teams! /nerd
posted by vorfeed at 4:05 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


Uh, while they were never all that direct about it in the show, Firefly and Serenity take place in one solar system with dozens of planets and hundreds of moons, the most suitable of which were terraformed. The colonists arrived in generation ships and no Faster-Than-Light travel took place. This puts all of the travel done by the Serenity between moons and planets over days and weeks, which is still pretty damned fast but not anywhere near as implausible as most other space opera.

The terraforming (gravity aside) was not perfect, leading to a number of locations where mineral deficiencies could occur amongst the colonists too far from the supply chain located in the more civilized worlds. Mutant Enemy got the solar system business right, it's just the terraforming would be such an arduous and lengthy business that it would hardly be worth it, especially for anything outside of a habitable zone, but then that seems fairly common to space opera in general.
posted by adipocere at 4:06 PM on January 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


Ooh. Here's hoping that this new BSG prequel gets made and turns into a series...
posted by killdevil at 4:12 PM on January 24, 2011


Frak me, this is just entirely too cool.
posted by deadmessenger at 4:22 PM on January 24, 2011


"Jane Espenson, Colonial Deputy Secretary of Education."

Nicest touch.
posted by bicyclefish at 4:32 PM on January 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


So if we terraform Mars we have to rename it Marson?

'Cause that doesn't work for me.
posted by bwg at 4:34 PM on January 24, 2011


That is totally badass how Caprica and Gemenon share a mutual orbit. Nice metaphor.
posted by hal_c_on at 4:41 PM on January 24, 2011


Their horoscopes must be hellishly complicated.
posted by itstheclamsname at 4:44 PM on January 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


I like that they have a planet named for Cancer, which is also a disease in their world. I'm imagining one of our doctors telling a patient: "The tests came back. I'm sorry, you have Nebraska."
posted by Legomancer at 5:13 PM on January 24, 2011 [9 favorites]


What I would really like the science advisor to explain is why the robots' spines can glow red

Spoilers ahead.

The writers repeatedly expressed regret for that scene in the pilot. For all intents and purposes, it was non-canon. The communicating-through-the-arms thing could possibly be explained by the Cylons having a particularly advanced nervous system that happened to almost exactly resemble our own.

Remember that the series made it clear that the Cylons were not indistinguishable from humans to a trained scientist -- Baltar's Cylon detector worked, but wasn't used or trusted for a variety of reasons.
posted by schmod at 5:22 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


I too was concerned about the orbits as they seemed to be ripe for collision, but I see it as highly compressed (i.e. not to scale) with a few overlapping orthogonal ellipses.

Also, as a Scorpio, I was happy to find that Scorpia was the paradise vacation planet of religious tolerance.

Double also: The Whelk - me too.
posted by Navelgazer at 5:27 PM on January 24, 2011


*knock knock*
"Who is it?"
"It's...it's me."
"B...Battlestar? You've got a lot of nerve coming back here."
"No, wait, just give me a minute!"
"Why should I? You give me one goddamned reason why I should listen to anything you have to say."
"You're still angry? I know it ended badly between us, but I...look, just forget it..."
"No, I said I'd hear you out, so let's have it."
"I made you this. It's a map. I...I hoped it might, you know...that things might be better - I mean, it's been so long, and I thought..."
"It's not enough, Battlestar. I'm sorry. I'm...look, thanks for trying, and I didn't mean to shout at you just now, but...it's just too late. I think we both know it's too late."
"But you said you'd give me a second chance! You promised!"
"And we tried, I know we did. But Caprica...I...it was just never going to work. You couldn't expect me to just forget..."
"One thing! It was just that one thing, one silly little thing..."
"FUCKING SPACE ANGELS?!...no, don't cry, I'm sorry. I can't help it...that's not an excuse, I know, I'm not angry at you anymore, I just...Look, I don't want things to be messy for us again. Can't we just go our separate ways?"
"The map...just look at the map...we could just be friends again and see what happens..."
"I can't. You know why. It wouldn't be good for either of us."
"We can make this work!"
"Please. Please, just...just go."
*click*
posted by obiwanwasabi at 5:37 PM on January 24, 2011 [40 favorites]


This is nice.

Few things that make me wince (we're going out of our way to say "libration points" instead of "Lagrangian points" to avoid the Earth terminology, but we're still going to refer to "Trojans" orbiting there?). But still very nice, and well-done.
posted by ubernostrum at 5:37 PM on January 24, 2011


obiwanwasabi's conversation apparently began at the door and ended on the phone.

I think that's proof enough of space angels.
posted by Navelgazer at 5:40 PM on January 24, 2011 [12 favorites]


I blew up this map, trying to read every little detail on it. It made me irrationally happy, mainly because I'm a sucker for these kinds of details.

Sure, Battlestar sort of spun out at the end. But you know what? It was damn good television, and I have to admit, I enjoyed the entire crazy ride. I never watched Caprica, but now that it's in the bin, I'll probably pick it up - and I'm definitely going to watch Blood and Chrome.

I don't know, I love scifi, and this series hit about every right note for me (last 30 minutes notwithstanding). It even managed to pull my wife, who was both burned by the last 3 years of the X-Files and not a scifi fan, into the show.

All that being said, I wish the Canceron Hydras luck this year in the Pyramid league.
posted by SNWidget at 5:46 PM on January 24, 2011


The court order said I wasn't allowed to slam the door on her anymore*, so I only ever open it a crack and leave the chain hooked up.

*Or stand outside her window and holler obscenities*.

*Like "fucking sellout incoherent whore."
posted by obiwanwasabi at 5:46 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


I always just figured the show had move-to-the-next-scene-drives and didn't worry too much about how it all made sense. Like how in the original BSG they'd find random inhabited planets out there they had no record of.

Like somehow you have this huge goddamned space-faring civilization that can't keep the most basic records of where the jails are.

But the map is cool, sure.
posted by GuyZero at 5:49 PM on January 24, 2011


"The tests came back. I'm sorry, you have Nebraska."

There's only one thing to say to that: Belgium!
posted by jiawen at 6:18 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


Sure, Battlestar sort of spun out at the end. But you know what? It was damn good television, and I have to admit, I enjoyed the entire crazy ride.

I said it before and I'll say it again, I just assume New Caprica became a shitty occupied settlement and everything after that (like the part where they go for the tactic simply marked BOO!) is fiction written by an author in the colony.
posted by The Whelk at 6:28 PM on January 24, 2011 [3 favorites]



Double also: The Whelk - me too.

Using my own names cause the canon names over use the -ion ending, I use the following names to know which cities in Civ games are near which resources

Caprica - Capitol
Arleon - Food production
Picon - Fish, pearls
Aquaris - Major sea port, clams
Libris - Science, culture
Virga - Luxury goods
Leonid - pack animals, along a river
Scorpio - Military production
Geminon - Gems, gold, banks, etc
Canceri - Metal works, heavy industry
Saggiter - Horses, population center
Tau - Catch all, ideally oil.

If it expands after all you go the Firefly names, Sidon, Whitehall, etc.
posted by The Whelk at 6:35 PM on January 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


So, anyway, you know what makes less sense than this, planets and distances wise? Empire Strikes Back.

And then of course there's Firefly.


Firefly makes total sense once you realize that the monolith turned a gas giant system into a star.

ALL THESE GORRAM WORLDS ARE YOURS, EXCEPT THE ONE THAT SPAWNED THE REAVERS. WE'D RECOMMEND YOU AVOID THAT ONE. SERIOUSLY, JUST LET IT GO. NOTHING TO SEE HERE, MOVE ALONG. OK, WHATEVER, BUT DON'T SAY WE DIDN'T WARN YOU.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 6:55 PM on January 24, 2011 [4 favorites]


rtha: "And in case anyone is wondering, the series bible can be found here (.pdf, less than awesome scan)."

I was prepared to "So say we all," but I was disappointed when that was not the type of bible you were talking..
posted by Deflagro at 8:02 PM on January 24, 2011


The Whelk - my list is pretty similar to yours, but with Scorpia being my non-coastal gold-hub and Gemenon as my first iron source. (I'm playing on Civ IV still, so the mechanics are probably different, but I use every city with decent production as a military center when needed.)
posted by Navelgazer at 8:03 PM on January 24, 2011


Oh, and Tauron is for cows, obviously.

Obviously.
posted by Navelgazer at 8:14 PM on January 24, 2011


i wonder what happened with caprica. it was like Moore went a little bonkers
posted by angrycat at 9:48 PM on January 24, 2011


What's with the Firefly hate?

It's the only show without FTL. I think "a very large solar system with multiple habitable/terraformable planets and moons" is less of a stretch than Jump Drives.
posted by unigolyn at 2:00 AM on January 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Firefly's system doesn't work because there's only really one distance from any sun at which a planet could have an Earthlike climate. You can't cram dozens of planets in and have a climate that looks exactly like Southern California on all of them. But that's just fine; a suspension of disbelief is necessary for any enjoyment of TV. The system is like this because it's necessary for how the plot's going to be. That's just fine.
The mistake far too many science fiction shows and movies make is to try to use implausible pseudoscientific claptrap to explain away these necessary plot devices. To anyone with a greater understanding of science than the scriptwriter, it makes things worse rather than better. I'm cool with the idea that some dude is turning into a monster if that's what the plot of the movie is, but I'm going to stop watching if you peer down a microscope and tell me it's because of a third strand to his DNA. If the science-babble isn't going to be remotely plausible, it's better to leave it out and get on with the entertainment.
This rant is in defence of Firefly having an impossible planetary system that serves the plot and not worrying about it, rather than an attack on the BSG map which I don't intend to look at or have an opinion on.
posted by nowonmai at 4:10 AM on January 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Sure, Battlestar sort of spun out at the end.

This should be in the dictionary as an example of absolute understatement.
posted by juiceCake at 4:59 AM on January 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Lightbox: Simultaneously the best and worst part of images on the web.
posted by blue_beetle at 5:46 AM on January 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I asked a relevant question a few years ago on AskMefi. It was in relation to Firefly, though.

Gotta say, I still think any system or metasystem with multiple habitable worlds pretty much HAS to be an artificial construct. Which opens up all sorts of ideas for stories. Too bad both BSG and Firefly ignored this obvious conclusion.
posted by geekhorde at 6:20 AM on January 25, 2011


Duh, God made the system and left angels to watch over it.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 6:42 AM on January 25, 2011


Unless God interferes. Again.

Kind of my point. If I had seen only the first year or two of BSG, I would agree that this is exceedingly unlikely. But by the end there was so much yammering about "destiny" and "God's plan" that I can shrug this solar system's arrangement off.

Gotta say, I still think any system or metasystem with multiple habitable worlds pretty much HAS to be an artificial construct. Which opens up all sorts of ideas for stories. Too bad both BSG and Firefly ignored this obvious conclusion.

Somebody gets it.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 8:44 AM on January 25, 2011


Sure, Battlestar sort of spun out at the end.

This should be in the dictionary as an example of absolute understatement.


But still, there was cake.

Anyway, I recently rewatched the whole run and it holds up better on a second viewing. Not that it does not go a little slack, but it is not the disaster that many have made it out to be.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 8:49 AM on January 25, 2011


Anyway, I recently rewatched the whole run and it holds up better on a second viewing. Not that it does not go a little slack, but it is not the disaster that many have made it out to be.

Wow, do I ever disagree. My favorite episode was always Downloaded, and I struggled through the rewatch to get to it, only to have to turn it off during the "angel" part at the end. That scene (complete with sappy poetry about ~the powaa of love~) works when it might be a product of Caprica's subconscious, or some weird Cylon thing, or really almost any unspecified cause, but it does not work when you know it's supposed to be VeggieTales: Galactica Edition. It's not funny-ha-ha anymore, it's funny-why-am-I-still-watching-this.

A lot of the series is like that, especially if you ever gave two shits about Starbuck and/or the Cylons -- the finale retroactively wrecks the whole show. The rewatch just wasn't worth it for me.
posted by vorfeed at 9:15 AM on January 25, 2011


but it is not the disaster that many have made it out to be

Sure, these things are subjective of course. I'm going with rather disappointing disaster, second only to Russel T. Davies' butchering of Doctor Who and to George Lucas's butchering of the Star Wars franchise (ok, that may be a classic example of overstatement because at least BSG didn't get cute.)
posted by juiceCake at 9:21 AM on January 25, 2011


Anyway, I recently rewatched the whole run and it holds up better on a second viewing. Not that it does not go a little slack, but it is not the disaster that many have made it out to be.

Having recently done the same, I'd say the good parts hold up spectacularly well and the bad parts crash and burn even harder.

SO SAY WE ALL.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 10:44 AM on January 25, 2011


One of my favorite things is how it's totally random how bulletproof cyclons are from week to week.
posted by Artw at 10:51 AM on January 25, 2011


One of my favorite things is how it's totally random how bulletproof cylons are from week to week.

Seriously, I don't think the writers ever had the slightest clue about how the Cylons worked, other than as a plot device. See also: Colonial society, which managed to remain about as fleshed-out by the end as it was in the miniseries. The stuff about their religion (especially in The Plan, in which we learn that space!polytheism really is just Catholicism plus an Emacs search-and-replace) is so dumb it hurts.
posted by vorfeed at 1:20 PM on January 25, 2011


Let's not forget that in addition to being able to jam a USB cable in their arm and cure computer viruses they can send messages to cylon raiders by looking them in the eyes. Not sure you can really explain that one away with fine-tuned nervous systems.
posted by Artw at 1:53 PM on January 25, 2011


Seriously, I don't think the writers ever had the slightest clue about how the Cylons worked, other than as a plot device

This always bothered, because there's two classes of Cylons, the mechanical and the humanoid, yet the humanoid return control over the mechanical, who originally rebelled against the humans. Yet, they're taking orders and willing to die because of what human like Cylons order them to do.

In the end, the mechanical Cylons are given their freedom and go off to do something else, while the skinjobs decide to give up indoor plumbing and medicine to go teach cavemen. But why didn't they fight for their freedom before this? And why the hell did they want to look and be like humans, which had much weaker bodies?

There's much to like about the series, but the a little, ok a lot, less Starbuck and Apollo and more Cylons would have been good.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 2:02 PM on January 25, 2011


I never watched Caprica, but now that it's in the bin, I'll probably pick it up - and I'm definitely going to watch Blood and Chrome.

Don't. I watched the whole first season of Caprica and kept expecting it to get better. It didn't. They've pretty much skewered most eveything about the BSG storyline. It's a sci-fi soap opera, and I don't mean that in a good way.
posted by P.o.B. at 3:05 PM on January 25, 2011




Caprica, sadly, is really not worth it.
In terms of the Cylons, when the show was on I am such a nerd I listened to Moore's podcasts obsessively. Lots of interesting stuff there, in terms of how to tell a story. However, a couple things were not well defined from the beginning -- whether or not the Cylons were always going to be evil, and also, what the hell was the plan? There was no plan. Wasn't that post-show thing with the two Cavils called the plan? I still don't fucking no what the plan was.

It's weird to me that w/ BSG (and Lost, for an even better example) the creators don't outline this shit out before hand so that it makes sense. Or maybe they do and then shit happens?
posted by angrycat at 3:42 PM on January 25, 2011


Let's not forget that in addition to being able to jam a USB cable in their arm and cure computer viruses they can send messages to cylon raiders by looking them in the eyes. Not sure you can really explain that one away with fine-tuned nervous systems.

My all-time favorite moment along these lines is actually in the finale: someone gives Dean Stockwell the CIC-phone so he can call up the Cylon Colony and propose a truce, and he picks it up and yells "HELLO? HELLO! IT'S ME, CAVIL!"

That line busts me up every time, because yeah, why the fuck did they just give the boss of the robots a phone with a wire on it so he can call up his armada of robot spaceships? Who exactly is he supposed to be talking to, and why can't he talk to them via Cylon Wifi or whatever, instead of borrowing Galactica's crappy 1980s brick-phone? Is he actually yelling at the Raiders? Do they have tiny little cell phones, each with a red light that slides back and forth whenever he calls?

I swear Stockwell hung a lampshade on that line on purpose.
posted by vorfeed at 4:00 PM on January 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


They... didn't have a plan.
posted by Artw at 4:01 PM on January 25, 2011


I actually started to get into Caprica once it became a contest between the inventor and his daughter. But it took way too long to get there.

also, what the hell was the plan?

There literally was no plan, it was just a gimmick from one of the show creators.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 4:34 PM on January 25, 2011


I always thought calling the movie "The Plan" was ironic. The truth was that they worked up an invasion but everything after that was pretty much messed up from the get-go.
posted by GuyZero at 4:37 PM on January 25, 2011


The original Battlestar Galactica series bible is Ron Moore's rebuke to Star Trek

You know, fromth at I'd say that there's a lot of positive cool stuff in the series bible, and it served them well at first, but boy did they get further and further away from it.
posted by Artw at 4:49 PM on January 25, 2011


I also watched that Plan show. It was terrible. The original writers had something good and surprisingly nobody else can reproduce it.
posted by P.o.B. at 6:30 PM on January 25, 2011


It wasn't just the writers, it was the direction and acting and special effects. When BSG was good, like the episode Scar, it was really good.

My pet theory is that the show had a built failure point with its intended audience: religion and sci fi fans don't mix well, especially when the logic and sureness of science can be tossed aside by goddamn space angels.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 6:43 PM on January 25, 2011


Eh. I'm a SF nerd who's totally okay with religion and mysticism, it just wasn't done with any kind of skill.
posted by The Whelk at 7:22 PM on January 25, 2011


It was well acted!
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 7:30 PM on January 25, 2011


Part of the problem is that the goddamn space angels weren't such until the last forty-five minutes of the show. Having the actors jump out and yell SURPRISE IT'S GOD PLUS LUDDITE THEMES at the last possible second isn't particularly honest (or decent) writing, sci-fi or not. It smacks of wanting to have your audience and piss them off, too (as does RDM's insistence that people who hated the ending were all just nerdy-nerds who "think too much".)

"Religion and mysticism" was all over BSG. It was never a problem when it was being handled as something the characters believed which might or might not be true, as opposed to The Convenient Answer To The Entire Conflict Plus All The Questions We Did Not Bother To Answer Otherwise.
posted by vorfeed at 7:59 PM on January 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


The original Battlestar Galactica series bible is Ron Moore's rebuke to Star Trek

So it had something about being less consistent and moving from superb to mediocrity in it?
posted by juiceCake at 8:04 AM on January 26, 2011


It wasn't just the writers, it was the direction and acting and special effects.

No doubt, but it starts with the writing. Caprica has some good acting and effects in it but those just can't make up for the atrocious storyline.

"Religion and mysticism" was all over BSG.

Maybe someone could correct me, but I don't remember them even really getting into that until at least the second season. When I first started watching BSG I think it took a good couple of episodes before I realized they were saying the plural Gods.
posted by P.o.B. at 10:05 AM on January 26, 2011


Flesh and Bone is a pretty religious episode (Leoben shows up, explains Cylon monotheism and spouts some mystic crap, then gets tossed out the airlock. Afterward, Starbuck prays to idols of Artemis and Aphrodite for his "soul"). It's season 1, episode 8.

The whole "Roslin is the Dying Leader because the Sacred Scrolls say so, and also she's having visions" thing is also all over season 1.
posted by vorfeed at 1:11 PM on January 26, 2011


There was a human looking Cylon in Battlestar Galactica 1980. Perhaps Moore looked to that series and made tribute but mimicking it's awfulness.
posted by juiceCake at 2:10 PM on January 26, 2011


Meh. It still wasn't at least until half way through the first season when it became more than "OMGods". I wouldn't of cared if they had just kept the poly vs. monotheistic religous stuff to "this is what largely guides us through life". That's actually what keeps Caprica watchable as compared to BSG.
When I first saw the bit about Roslin having drug induced hallucinations I just thought it was kind of an extra loop in the storyline, but they didn't really start laying into all the religiosity until season two.
posted by P.o.B. at 6:29 PM on January 26, 2011


Yeah, for all they avoided "the usual stories about parallel universes, time-travel, mind-control, evil twins, God-like powers and all the other cliches" they sure found their own set of cliches and weak storytelling devices pretty quickly - some of which have survived on into other, far worse shows like V.
posted by Artw at 7:01 PM on January 26, 2011


V is such a terrible show.

If you can't get me to watch your science fiction television, you are doing something wrong.
posted by Justinian at 10:38 AM on January 27, 2011


Kittens for Breakfast made me watch it.

So bad... So terribly bad...
posted by Artw at 11:02 AM on January 27, 2011


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