Join 3,572 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

February 8, 2012
Market Ouvert
Normally, when you buy stolen goods, you don't legally own them. The person they were stolen from still does. Unless: Until 1995, if you bought them in Bermondsey Market, London, between the hours of sunrise and sunset, they would then belong to you, even if clearly stolen.
posted by Zarkonnen at 10:43 PM PST - 37 comments

Ceci n'est pas une horloge
The Clock is a film that is also a clock. It runs for 24 consecutive hours, and is made of thousands of samples, some lasting only seconds, others minutes, from hundreds of films and videos. All of it edited into a seamless whole by video artist Christian Marclay. When it is shown, it is synchronized to the real time, so if it's 2:15 on a clock shown on-screen, it's 2:15 in real time. Harrison Ford is in it. So is John Cusack, Humphrey Bogart, Michelle Pfeiffer, Lon Chaney, Roger Moore(and all the other James Bonds), John Cleese, Peter Sellers, Orson Welles, the Beatles, Jody Foster, Gregory Peck, Nicole Kidman, Nick Cage and a few hundred others. You'll see The Simpsons and The Office. You'll see The Avengers. You'll see stuff you have no clue about. Here's what it feels like to watch all twenty four hours of it in one sitting. [more inside]
posted by storybored at 9:49 PM PST - 58 comments

Teddy Wants You!
You probably already know that mascots wearing over-sized caricature foam heads of the four Mount Rushmore presidents race around the bases during home games for the Washington Nationals. You also probably know that Teddy has never officially won a single race.

Did you know that if you are over 18, 5'7" to 6'6", can run from center field to home plate in 40 seconds, dig the costume, and are available for 35 home games in Washington, DC, that you can become one of them? [more inside]
posted by juliplease at 8:42 PM PST - 35 comments

Sell, Mortimer, Sell!
Railfans love it. Model Railroaders adore it. Economics people study it. The Tropicana Corporation runs between 10 and 12 30-to-50-car trains of it every week. Behold, 5000 tons of Orange Juice on the move. [more inside]
posted by pjern at 8:40 PM PST - 31 comments

Its KNITTING needles
Water Drops, Knitting Needles, and the ISS (SLYT)
posted by ShawnString at 8:20 PM PST - 13 comments

New toxoplasma findings
Your cat may be giving you parasites that make you reckless and maybe even schizophrenic.
posted by texorama at 8:15 PM PST - 62 comments

Björk... finally a troubadour?
Björk explains her interactive touch screen album to Stephen Colbert. The longtime boundary-pushing, Icelandic musician (and ever-fascinating fashionista) released Biophilia in October. It is the first album created entirely on touch screens and subsequently released as an album for touch screens with interactive apps for each song. Her interview (and performance in an inflatable dress) support her desire to educate kids about science through the album and its apps. Is this the future of music?
posted by achpea at 8:04 PM PST - 38 comments

Watch out, Walter White!
Spreading Meth Across the China-North Korea Border [more inside]
posted by astapasta24 at 7:57 PM PST - 16 comments

A Brief History of Bioarchaeology
Kristina Killgrove, a biological anthropologist, has started a series of blog posts titled A Brief History of Bioarcheology. Part 1: America Part 2: Italy
posted by Cloud King at 7:54 PM PST - 4 comments

David Choe - he like to gamble.
Fortune favors the bold. In 2005, then Facebook's president Sean Parker asked David Choe, an LA-based graffiti artist, to paint the walls of his Palo Alto office. Choe - who had just finished a prison stint in Japan - says Facebook offered him stock options or $60,000 cash. For some reason, he chose stock options. Seven years later, that stock is said to be worth around $500 million. [more inside]
posted by phaedon at 7:37 PM PST - 39 comments

Hey man you want to make an easy $5?
Google is quietly launching a new program called Screenwise aimed at collected more data from users than is possible from monitoring activity across Google-owned sites. The program comes in two flavors: a browser-based extension that will share with Google the sites you visit and how you use them, and a Cisco-made, Knowledge Networks-managed "black box" installed on your home network to measure Internet use. The first program pays users up to $25 in Amazon gift cards, the second pays $100 for signing up, and an additional $20 every month the device is installed up to a maximum of one year. To be eligible for the programs users must have a Google account, install and use Chrome, and be 13 or older. Ars Technica has excerpts from leaked sign up process documents:
According to legal agreements displayed during signup, Google will share the aggregated data with third parties, including "academic institutions, advertisers, publishers, and programming networks." The agreement notes that the data collected will be personally identifiable, with some exceptions: https addresses and private browsing windows of people using the router will not be tracked. The browser extension, however, will track private or incognito browsing, though the data will not be personally identifiable. For all other collected data, Google will "attempt" to remove that identifiable info before sharing it—no guarantees, though.
[more inside]
posted by 2bucksplus at 6:05 PM PST - 87 comments

Wait, are we talking about the 1990's?
The dream of the 90's 1890's is alive in Portland (SLYT)
posted by Godwin Interjection at 6:04 PM PST - 71 comments

what goes up can always go down
Felix Salmon muses on why art prices keep rising. On the way, he discusses why some art becomes super-popular:

"Fine art has become the billionaire’s-club equivalent of a Louis Vuitton bag, slathered in logos. It’s not connoisseurship which drives values, so much as recognizability. Which in turn helps to explain why the most prolific artists (Picasso, Warhol, Hirst) are also the most expensive: the more of their work there is, the more exposed to it people become, the more they’ll recognize it, and therefore the more desirable it is."
posted by benbenson at 4:55 PM PST - 23 comments

404: Sky not found
Why William Gibson Distrusts Aging Futurists’ Nostalgia
posted by Artw at 4:50 PM PST - 59 comments

Kevin Goes to Kink Camp
"Risk" is a free podcast for storytelling junkies, hosted by Kevin Allison (formerly of the State). In episodes 229 and 230 (obviously NSFW), the host himself shares an unusual tale of being a gay man at a hetero "kink" camp.
posted by The ____ of Justice at 3:25 PM PST - 14 comments

Not so sorry as all that, Alan Turing
Alan Turing, British code-breaker during WWII, imminent computer scientist, and much else has been denied a posthumous pardon from the British government for his 1952 conviction on charges of "Gross Indecency" because of his homosexuality. [more inside]
posted by clavier at 3:09 PM PST - 92 comments

Portia Nuh Play
"Portia Simpson Miller, the former and newly re-elected Prime Minister of Jamaica and representative of the People's National Party, recently took an historically significant position by openly supporting GLBT legal protection in Jamaica, a country internationally notorious for a "culture of homophobia." Miller's statements come at a time of great cultural change in both Jamaica and dancehall music. This is for her." This is a mixtape of dancehall music and some of it is NSFW.
posted by Kattullus at 3:04 PM PST - 9 comments

Full Revelations of a Professional Rat-Catcher, after 25 Years’ Experience
In placing before my readers in the following pages the results of my twenty-five years’ experience of Rat-catching, Ferreting, etc., I may say that I have always done my best to accomplish every task that I have undertaken, and I have in consequence received excellent testimonials from many corporations, railway companies, and merchants. I have not only made it my study to discover the different and the best methods of catching Rats, but I have also taken great interest in watching their ways and habits, and I come to the conclusion that there is no sure way of completely exterminating the Rodents, especially in large towns. If I have in this work referred more particularly to Rat-catching in Manchester that is only because my experience, although extending over a much wider area, has been chiefly in that city, but the methods I describe are equally applicable to all large towns.

Yours truly,

IKE MATTHEWS.

PROFESSIONAL RAT-CATCHER,
PENDLETON,
MANCHESTER.

posted by timshel at 3:02 PM PST - 33 comments

dress-up & paper dolls
Hipster girl? Hipster boy? Superhero? Mii? A modern Mucha? Regency hero or heroine? Tudors? Steampunk (one, two)? Here's more.
How about pop culture? True Blood. Mad Men (Joan S1, S2, S3). Marty McFly (by Derek Eads). Jonathan Coulton. Lady GaGa. Kyle Hilton (previously: Arrested Development) also has Parks and Recreation, Breaking Bad, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and various films. (previously: a blog - manly - PONIES)
posted by flex at 2:45 PM PST - 20 comments

RIP Nello Ferrara
Nello Ferrara, chairman of Ferrara Pan Candy Co (previously), died Friday at his home in River Forest at age 93. The Chicago Sun Times has an excellent obituary profiling his rather interesting life.
posted by hippybear at 2:20 PM PST - 30 comments

Your money's no good here.
Is The Shining really about the gold standard? Using unpublished info from the Stanley Kubrick Archives as a key source, Kubrick's Gold Story [part 1 of 4] is a film analysis that uncovers economic themes encoded in The Shining with regard to gold vs fiat monetary systems. Written, narrated and edited by Rob Ager [Previously].
posted by albrecht at 12:47 PM PST - 75 comments

You say Tlingit, I say Hlingit
After years of work, New Zealand scholar Sally-Ann Lambert just released volume 2 of her 9-volume linguistics series. “Hlingit Word Encyclopedia: The Origin of Copper” is a 630-page encyclopedia of the SE Alaskan native language Tlingit. She traveled to Sitka for a mid-January book release and found one little problem: none of the Tlingit native speakers or scholars there recognized the language in it. [more inside]
posted by msalt at 12:36 PM PST - 97 comments

Virtual Medieval Europe, a journey back in time through text and illustrations
If you'd like to know a bit about medieval life in Europe, History on the Net has some information on life in medieval times, prepared as educational summaries for students. If you'd like to know more, Medieval Life And Times has a broader scope, and the surface links often have a number of subsequent links to even more information on sub-topics. If you want even more specifics, here is a list of medieval occupations, some information on buying, selling and bartering in medieval times, and a history of horses in Europe. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief at 12:02 PM PST - 19 comments

I shot myself at 15 p.s.i. just to make sure.
President Obama fires a marshmallow gun built by an 8th grader.[SLYT] [more inside]
posted by hot_monster at 11:28 AM PST - 122 comments

Face the thing that should not be
In the coldest spot on the earth’s coldest continent, Russian scientists have reached a freshwater lake the size of Lake Ontario after spending a decade drilling through more than two miles of solid ice. Maybe the mountains of madness are underground. Lovecraft would loved to have seen this.
posted by Hickeystudio at 11:22 AM PST - 76 comments

Program or be Programmed
Programming is the new High School Diploma
posted by DU at 10:54 AM PST - 73 comments

"...though we may have our differences, we are one people, and we are one nation, united by a common creed."
Founded in 1857, The Atlantic is one of the oldest publications still being produced in the US. They have created a commemorative issue for the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War that includes articles published in the magazine over a century ago, an extensive gallery of images, as well as a few essays and analyses by modern writers, including President Obama. Editor's note. (Via: James Fallows' Reddit AMA) [more inside]
posted by zarq at 10:34 AM PST - 22 comments

DIY WALL-E
The WALL-E Builders Club formed in October 2007 as an offshoot of the R2 (yes that one) builders club, to create their own WALL-E replica. This is their current progress on the project.
posted by mrzarquon at 9:49 AM PST - 17 comments

The Great Backyard Bird Count
Next weekend, February 17-20, is the 2012 Great Backyard Bird Count, sponsored by the National Audubon Society, the Cornell Lab for Ornithology, and Bird Studies Canada. [more inside]
posted by elsietheeel at 9:10 AM PST - 17 comments

An Internet Troll
So there you go: an internet troll. That's what they look like.
posted by Avenger50 at 9:03 AM PST - 95 comments

CHEEZ Cartoon Art
Canada's Exclaim magazine former cartoonist Fiona Symth's new art. CHEEZ was originally a monthly comic/drawing published in Canada's Exclaim Magazine over a ten year period from 1992 to 2002. There were no editorial restrictions on the work apart from the monthly deadline and the colour restrictions of the paper (the art work had to be black and white). Each strip was created shortly before the deadline and numbered in chronological order. This CHEEZ will be drawn weekly and will continue with the same numbering sequence and restrictive palette. A collection of the first one hundred strips was published as CHEEZ 100 by Pedlar Press in 2001.
posted by Ark_Light at 9:02 AM PST - 9 comments

"I don't understand how you evolved. You are too goofy,"
"The idea that a species domesticated itself is a bit crazy, but there are some species that outcompeted others by becoming nicer." Wired examines the phenomena of self-domestication. [more inside]
posted by quin at 8:59 AM PST - 38 comments

States Target Foreign Law
There are several groups trying to pass bills in different states to ban the application of foreign laws in a US court, especially Sharia law. These groups are almost all using model legislation drafted by anti-Muslim activist David Yerushalmi.
posted by reenum at 8:36 AM PST - 97 comments

Coming back like Jordan wearing the 45
Tom Murphy is an Anchor/Reporter/Producer and Weather Man on Channel 11 in Alpena, Michigan. [more inside]
posted by cashman at 7:50 AM PST - 31 comments

Jeremy mother fuckin' Lin
"Lin is saving the Knicks with super-human play, but he's dispelling myths about Asian America by being otherwise hyper-normal and I thank him. He doesn't have a duty to embrace Asian America, speak for Asian America, or represent Asian America because right now he IS Asian America." -- Eddie Huang on Yao Ming, Jeremy Lin, and being Asian in America. [more inside]
posted by mathowie at 7:38 AM PST - 67 comments

wah wah wah wah waahhh
John Williams turned 80 today! The American composer is best known for the themes from Star Wars, Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Indiana Jones, but starting with the score adaptation for Valley of the Dolls, he's racked up 47 Oscar nominations in a 44-year span, including 5 wins. [more inside]
posted by troika at 7:26 AM PST - 52 comments

52 Songs 52 Stories
52 Songs 52 Stories [more inside]
posted by Sailormom at 6:58 AM PST - 8 comments

Reviews of Bad Books
Nicole Cliff has been reviewing Classic Trash fiction for The Awl, with a recent exposition on Clan of the Cave Bear. Jeffrey Sconce reviewed 100 obscure and largely unloved books last year on Consumed and Judged, and shows no sign of slowing down. Pop Sensation profiles the cover of one, generally trashy, paperback, three times a week, (and includes a seemingly random quote from the book).
posted by latkes at 6:48 AM PST - 19 comments

"The Enemy", wear thin?
"Muslim-American Terrorism in the Decade Since 9/11" (PDF) is a report by Professor Charles Kurzman of the University of North Carolina, published by the Triangle Center for Terrorism and Homeland Security. The TCFTHS is a collection of experts in the "Research Triangle" of North Carolina, associated with Duke, UNC and NC State and RTI, the independent research institute dedicated to aggregating and marketing the research resources of these three institutions. [more inside]
posted by running order squabble fest at 6:44 AM PST - 23 comments

Civilisation with an s
Civilisation: A Personal View by Kenneth Clark is a 13-part documentary produced by the BBC that was first aired on in 1969. It is considered to be a landmark in British Television's broadcasting of the visual arts. Here's the entire series (13 one-hour episodes) on YouTube. This is a treat for those of you who like History of Art, especially so if you haven't yet got around to seeing it. [more inside]
posted by baejoseph at 5:16 AM PST - 24 comments

An 18% gratuity will be charged if this post gets more than 6 viewers
How do people read menus? [More] Apparently we read them top-to-bottom and left-to-right, just like books! For your reading pleasure, here's a selection of menu items from the New York Public Library, the University of Washington, the CIA, Derrick Bostrom, Rusty Thomas, Johnson & Wales, Mark, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Colorado, Italy, and other places... [more inside]
posted by twoleftfeet at 3:29 AM PST - 24 comments